Federal Stimulus Act–Newsletter8

Stimulus and Nonprofits, Vol. 8 – MNN’s ARRA Newsletter – August 6, 2009

Dear Nonprofit Leader,

I hope that you made good use of MNN’s  ARRA Newsletter, Volumes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7. Today we present Volume 8 of our research on the opportunities for nonprofits to participate in the economic recovery of our country. Again, please let us know if it is useful and how it can be made more so and please share it.

NOTE: If, now or in the future, you have been or expect to be successful in accessing any funds from the stimulus package, and this newsletter was helpful in that process, please let us know the purpose and amount so we can let our funding source know. We will only share it without identifying information. This will help with our request to keep the newsletter going. THANKS!!!

Again, a big thank you to The Boston Foundation for generously providing financial support for this needed project.
Sincerely,

Dave Magnani,
Executive Director, 617-330-1188

To view Stimulus and Nonprofits, Volume 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 or for more information on the Massachusetts Nonprofit Network, please visit our website.

If this edition has been forwarded to you and you would like to receive future volumes please email us your name and organization.

Not a member? Please consider joining to sustain this and other programs.

Where we are right now

Since our most recent newsletter, there have been only small changes in the reported obligations and outlays of funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). From Massachusetts’s estimated $8.7 billion in total funding, $5.6 billion has been allotted. In recent weeks the Patrick Administration, along with state and municipal legislators, have taken a number of steps, including passing legislation, to position the state and ensure that projects conform to federal guidelines allowing the Commonwealth to maximize its stimulus funding.

Although some might claim that ARRA has run its course and that it has provided its last new opportunities, in fact there is still a steady flow of new grant opportunities and application deadlines for funding, many of which are focused on funding projects in future fiscal years.

One such example, announced on July 24th by President Barack Obama along with Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, is the Race to the Top Fund. This program will distribute $4.35 billion to States that according to the federal government “take necessary steps to improve education by doing such things as recruiting qualified teachers and compensating them in an innovative merit based manner, building effective data systems to track student’s achievements, and generally revitalizing low performing schools and preparing students for the modern job market.” While a portion of these funds will be allocated in 2009, the majority of these funds won’t be dispersed until the end of 2010.

It remains important for organizations to be alert for subsequent funding and grant announcements. Many of these are still occurring each week, and as has been the trend they are mostly structured as competitive grants which require adherence to strict application guidelines.

Newsletter Volume 8 includes newly released information on deadlines and specific requirements of many of the federal grant opportunities previously referenced in past newsletters. However, because we seek to provide new and relevant information, categories without new announcements or information have not been included. We suggest that you refer back to previous newsletters in order to have a comprehensive understanding of all the funding available in your category of interest.

If there is information that is not contained in this or previous newsletters which you would like us to know and/or to transmit to others, please email us at info@massnonprofitnet.org.

Funds Allocated to Date

Agency Announced



$ (Thousand)

Made Available
Paid Out
Department of Health and Human Services $1,650,904 $1,686,701 $906,606
Department of Education $1,649,338 $1,094,676 $432,661
Department of Housing and Urban Development $344,958 $206,408 $51,037
Department of Agriculture $15,089 $59,503 $50,975
Department of Justice $40,482 $40,848 $12,803
Department of Labor $78,335 $64,927 $6,031
Department of Transportation $757,534 $359,785 $2,747
National Science Foundation $0 $68,143 $1,593
Corporation for National and Community Service $696 $5,702 $508
Environmental Protection Agency $194,276 $198,567 $1
Railroad Retirement Board $938 $0 $0
US Army Corps of Engineers $9,055 $0 $0
National Endowment for the Arts $0 $1,736 $0
Department of Veterans Affairs $7,014 $0 $0
Department of Energy $245,319 $93,327 $0
Social Security Administration $288,230 $0 $0
General Services Administration $169,319 $0 $0
Department of Treasury $50,814 $54,614 $0
Department of the Interior $18,808 $0 $0
Department of Commerce $0 $1,363 $0
Department of Defense $62,080 $0 $0
Total $5,583,186 $3,936,299 $1,464,962

Reminder of Upcoming ARRA Deadlines

Please find below the upcoming deadlines for funding opportunities:

  • August 6th, 2009 – Deadline for Facilities Improvement Program
  • August 6th, 2009 – Deadline for Smart Grid Investment Grant Program
  • August 10th, 2009 – Full proposals due for NIST Research Construction Grants
  • August 14th, 2009 – Applications due for State Labor Market Information Improvement Grants
  • August 14th, 2009 – Deadline extended for Green Communities Planning Assistance
  • August 18th, 2009 – Deadline for receipt of application for Healthy Homes Technical Studies Grant
  • August 18th, 2009 – Deadline for Advanced Energy Efficient Building Technologies applications
  • Sept. 1st, 2009 – Applications due for round 2 of the Federal Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP).
  • Sept. 1st, 2009 – Deadline for competitive grant applications to buy and rehabilitate foreclosed properties and other projects to stabilize neighborhoods and create affordable housing
  • Sept. 1st, 2009 – Deadline for Early Career Research Program
  • Sept. 3rd, 2009 – Community Renewable Energy Deployment Deadline
  • Sept. 4th, 2009 – Deadline for Energy Training Partnerships Grants
  • Sept. 17th, 2009 – Deadline for Core Facility Renovation, Repair and Improvements Grants
  • Sept. 24th, 2009 – Deadline for Academic Research Enhancement Awards
  • Sept. 29th, 2009 – Applications due for Pathways out of Poverty Grants
  • Sept. 30th, 2009 – Deadline for Habitat Restoration in Coastal Areas Competitive Grant
  • Sept. 30th, 2009 – Applications due for Fish Passage Grants
  • Oct. 15th, 2009 – Applications due for Protection of Human Health by Immunology and Vaccines Limited Competition Grants
  • Oct. 20th, 2009 – Deadline for State Energy Sector Partnerships and Training Grants
  • June 30th, 2010 – Deadline for EDA Economic Recovery Program applications
  • June 31st, 2010 – Applications will be accepted on a rolling basis up until this date for Boston’s Neighborhood Stabilization Program funds Deadline for Capital Improvement Program (CIP) for Community Health Centers
  • February 16, 2011 – Assisted Housing Stability and Energy and Green Retrofit Deadline

Notices and Suggestions

Changes in Obama Adminstration Lobbying Restrictions
The much publicized restrictions the Obama Administration placed on lobbying, with regard to stimulus spending under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (Recovery Act), have been revised. According to a July 24th memorandum by Peter Orzag, Director of the Office of Management and Budget the restrictions will now be expanded to apply to all individuals, and not just federally registered lobbyists. The period in which the restrictions are to be imposed, however, has been reduced to time between the submission of competitive grant applications and when funds are awarded. There are no restrictions on logistical questions such as how to apply for funding, which agencies to contact, what are the deadlines, or similar information. These changes will allow registered lobbyists to communicate with government officials prior to application deadlines, but will require a form to be completed and posted on the associated agency’s website. The July 24 memo addresses frequently asked questions regarding the restrictions, and includes a sample of the aforementioned lobbyist contact form. Click here to view the July 24th memo.

Nonprofits and Stimulus Jobs
As competing opinions as to the effectiveness of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act emerge, nonprofits can serve a crucial role in demonstrating the success of the stimulus. It is suggested that nonprofits document their progress, successes, and difficulties. By having nonprofits take steps to record information, such as job creation numbers it will serve to highlight the contributions of nonprofits to statewide and national recovery. As a result, nonprofits will generate positive attention that could likely lead the sector receiving more funds, more quickly, which they have been poised and eager to invest. Additionally, by recording obstacles that have arisen, including unclear opportunities and access points, systematic flaws inhibiting nonprofit participation can be addressed. Nonprofits have clearly been creating jobs throughout the state, and it is important for their stories to be head in order for the sector’s contributions to appreciated.

Health and Human Services

Expanded Health Professions Training
On July 28th, Secretary Sebelius announced that $200 million will be made available by the Department of Health and Human Services in support of grants, loans, loan repayment, and scholarships to expand the training of health care professionals. This funding is part of a package of $500 million in the HHS’ Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), formed to address workforce shortages under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Using a competitive process to award the funding, the following programs will be financed with this $200 million:

  • $80.2 million for scholarships, loans, and loan repayment awards to students, health professionals, and faculty.  Of those funds, $39 million will be targeted to nurses and nurse faculty, $40 million to disadvantaged students in a wide range of health professions, and $1.2 million to health professions faculty from disadvantaged backgrounds.
  • $50 million in grants to health professions training programs.  Funds will be used to purchase equipment needed to expand programs and improve the quality of training.
  • $47.6 million to support primary care training programs. These funds will support the training of residents, medical students, physician assistants, dentists and individuals, many of whom will practice in underserved areas.
  • $10.5 million to strengthen the public health workforce.  Funds will support public health traineeships and increase the number of individuals trained through preventive medicine and dental public health residencies.
  • $10.2 million to increase the diversity of the health professions workforce.
  • And $1.5 million to support the efforts of state professional licensing boards in reducing barrier to telemedicine.

Some funding will be awarded over the next couple months, while the funding opportunities for some of the programs will only be announced during the same period so individual applicants will have time to prepare their materials. Please click here to see the full announcement.

Energy and Environment

State Funding

Federal Funds for Renewable Power and Energy Efficiency Projects
As of July 21st, Over $22 million has been awarded to Massachusetts under the Recovery Act for renewable power and energy efficiency projects at state-owned buildings and facilities. This funding, along with the $5.5 million previously awarded for administrative costs, represents about half of the $54.9 million the Commonwealth is expected to receive for the DOE’s State Energy Program (SEP). This funding will be invested in Massachusetts’s green economy, specifically in support of solar energy and energy efficiency programs. Among the plans is one to implement comprehensive energy management systems into state owned facilities to reduce energy costs and increase efficiency in the Commonwealth. This SEP is also expected to amass private funding as well as State and Federal funding. Resources will be awarded on a competitive basis as the state expects to fund proposals for energy efficiency and create green collar jobs. As more details please click here.

Deadline extended for green communities planning assistance
While Massachusetts’s Green Communities Act, which was passed in July 2008, is not specifically part of Recovery funding for renewable and green energy, it is often being directed through this program. Because of the influx of funding, the state has extended its deadline for Massachusetts communities to request state assistance in planning their own path to being designated a “Green Community” by the state. The grant program funds energy efficiency and renewable energy activities. Those communities that meet the following five criteria will be eligible for funding. The five criteria that the community must meet include that they:

  1. Provide for the as-of-right siting of renewable or alternative energy generating facilities, renewable or alternative energy research and development (R&D) facilities, or renewable or alternative energy manufacturing facilities in designated locations.
  2. Adopt an expedited application and permitting process under which these energy facilities may be sited within the municipality and which shall not exceed 1 year from the date of initial application to the date of final approval.
  3. Establish an energy use baseline inventory for municipal buildings, vehicles, street and traffic lighting, and put in place a comprehensive program designed to reduce this baseline by 20 percent within 5 years of initial participation in the program.
  4. Purchase only fuel-efficient vehicles for municipal use whenever such vehicles are commercially available and practicable.
  5. Require all new residential construction over 3,000 square feet and all new commercial and industrial real estate construction to minimize, to the extent feasible, the life-cycle cost of the facility by utilizing energy efficiency, water conservation and other renewable or alternative energy technologies.

Because the state realizes that most communities may need assistance in meeting these five criteria, the Green Communities Planning Assistance program was devised to fill this need. Despite the fact that the local government must apply for this program, there are many opportunities for local nonprofits in the energy sector to gain from any funding the community might obtain once they are deemed ‘green’ by the state. Therefore, local nonprofits have an opportunity and are encouraged to make sure their community meets this “green eligibility.” The deadline for planning assistance has been extended to August 14, 2009. For more information, click here.

Federal Funding

Community Renewable Energy Deployment
U.S. Department of Energy will be awarding up to $22 million to up to four communities nationwide. The funding will be put towards the implementation and planning of utility-scale community renewable energy projects. Communities will be provided funding and technical assistance in determining concepts, best practices, planning and financial approaches and policy guidance via the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). While community and state governments must apply for these grants, there is ample room for nonprofits to form partnerships with local agencies. Funds will be invested in both the public and private sector; it is also expected that funds will be matched by public and private entities. The DOE is pursuing the goal of implementing utility-scale renewable energy systems that provide clean, reliable and affordable energy supplies for their communities. Technologies expected to be included in such plans include solar, wind, biomass and geothermal systems in integrated renewable energy deployment systems. Completed applications are due by September 3, 2009. Please visit this site for more details.

Assisted Housing Stability and Energy and Green Retrofit
This funding is open to owners of properties receiving project-based assistance pursuant to section 202 of the Housing Act of 1959 (12 U.S.C. 17012), section 811 of the Cranston- Gonzalez National Affordable Housing Act (42 U.S.C. 8013, or Section 8 of the United States Housing Act of 1937 as amended (42 U.S.C. 1437f). Those managers or owners of such low-income housing will be able to apply for grants and loans to make energy efficient and green retrofits to their properties. Any funding received must be spent within two years and must agree to continued affordability for renters. Applications are due by February 16, 2011. See here for more details.

Education

Education Funding Update: Early Release

Title I, IDEA, and Vocational Rehabilitation (VR)
On April 1, 2009 the Department awarded 50 percent of each state’s Title I ARRA funds, 50 percent of each state’s IDEA ARRA funds, and 50 percent of each state’s Vocational Rehabilitation ARRA funds. Instead of releasing the second half of the funding by September 30th, as previously announced by the Department of Education, the $11.37 billion in funds will now be released on or around September 1st. This expedited funding represents the department’s desire to keep stimulus money flowing into districts rather than encouraging the discontinuation of important programs. Title I funding will be going to local educational agencies (LEAs) where there are high concentrations of students from families who live in poverty. IDEA funds will be invested with LEAs and early intervention service providers to implement new and/or innovative strategies for infants, toddlers, children and youths with disabilities. The VR resources should be used by LEAs to improve employment opportunities for those living with disabilities. For further details, please visit this link.

Labor and Workforce Development

State Funding

Western Massachusetts Enterprise Fund
U.S. Department of Agriculture, as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, will be awarding the Western Massachusetts Enterprise Fund (WMEF) $75,000. The community based small business loan fund will use this investment to help small businesses in the Berkshire, Franklin, Hampshire, Hampden and parts of Worcester counties. The WMEF focuses on providing financing for microenterprises and small businesses in the area. Please click here for more information.

Housing and Community Development

Local Funding

Massachusetts Communities Count Initiative
As part of Massachusetts’s recovery plan, more than $12.3 million in state and federal funds will be devoted to Worcester as they join a new partnership with local communities and the state to revitalize areas of the city that have been hit hardest by the economic downturn. Funding will be leveraged for such programs as:

  • Acquiring, rehabilitating or demolishing foreclosed properties
  • Weatherizing homes for low-and moderate-income homeowners
  • Offering job training for at risk youths
  • Supporting small businesses
  • Consumer affair assistance
  • Efforts to end homelessness in the city

The Communities Count Initiative, originally launched in Springfield last month, will be duplicated across the Commonwealth as a more comprehensive approach to the current economic climate. Specifically the Main South/Piedmont/Chandler neighborhoods will be targeted in Worcester as those with the most need for these funds. Within the $12.3 million, $4.73 million will be invested in weatherization and heating system upgrades and $2.39 million will be targeted to revitalize foreclosed properties in the city’s hard hit Main South/Piedmont/Chandler neighborhoods. The Worcester Community Action Council will be a key player in this attempt to control the fallout from the job losses and foreclosures that have hit this area so completely in this partnership that will combine state and local agencies. For further details, please click here.

Federal Funding

Tax Credit Assistance Program (TCAP) for Affordable Housing Construction
On July 28th U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan today announced that HUD is approving the final round of plans submitted by state housing finance agencies to jumpstart affordable housing programs. Massachusetts is set to receive $59,605,630 from HUD’s new Tax Credit Assistance Program (TCAP) that allows state housing finance agencies to resume funding of affordable rental housing projects while stimulating job creation in the hard-hit construction industry.

These new funds provide an opportunity for nonprofits address affordable housing projects that have been stalled because of the recession. Massachusetts received its TCAP awards through formula grants to state housing credit agencies with the intention of completing the construction of qualified housing projects that will ultimately provide affordable housing. Since a major purpose of this program is job creation, the Recovery Act establishes ambitious deadlines to spend the grant funds and requires state housing credit agencies to give priority to projects that can begin immediately and be completed by February 16, 2012. Click here for the full press release.

Useful Information for Current and Prospective ARRA Grantees

Grant Writing Training
HUD is offering a free, two day grant writing workshop in Stamford, CT. This workshop will cover the basics of grant writing techniques as well as tips on how to access government and other types of funding sources for nonprofits. The workshop is being offered on August 20-21st, 2009. The training will cover a variety of topics and will be run by trained HUD staff. For more information on this event, please go to this site.

Helpful websites:

Full list of federal grants available through the Recovery Act

Medicaid and Healthcare

Nutrition

Housing, Infrastructure, Economic Development

Unemployment Services:

Environment and Energy:

Register Now:

  • November 13 – MNN / Associated Grant Makers Annual Conference – “Grantmakers and Grantees for the Common Good” | Sheraton Framingham

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Federal Stimulus Act–Newsletter7

Stimulus and Nonprofits, Vol. 7 – MNN’s ARRA Newsletter – July 21, 2009

Dear Nonprofit Leader,

I hope that you made good use of MNN’s  ARRA Newsletter, Volumes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6. Today we present Volume 7 of our research on the opportunities for nonprofits to participate in the economic recovery of our country. Again, please let us know if it is useful and how it can be made more so and please share it.

NOTE: If, now or in the future, you have been or expect to be successful in accessing any funds from the stimulus package, and this newsletter was helpful in that process, please let us know the purpose and amount so we can let our funding source know. We will only share it without identifying information. This will help with our request to keep the newsletter going after July. THANKS!!!

Again, a big thank you to The Boston Foundation for generously providing financial support for this needed project.
Sincerely,

Dave Magnani,
Executive Director, 617-330-1188

To view Stimulus and Nonprofits, Volume 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 or for more information on the Massachusetts Nonprofit Network, please visit our website.

If this edition has been forwarded to you and you would like to receive future volumes please email us your name and organization.

Not a member? Please consider joining to sustain this and other programs.

Where we are right now

It has become evident since our most recent installments, the leaders at both the state and federal level are committed to delivering American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding at an increasingly rapid pace. Since the announcement of the Roadmap to Recovery a month ago by the Obama administration, Massachusetts has almost doubled the amount of funding that was obligated in the first four months since the Act’s signing. To date, $5.6 billion of the scheduled $8.7 billion has been disbursed, surging $500 million since our last newsletter. Click here for a more detailed listing of federal allotments.

Recent action focused on ARRA, however, has not been limited to the federal government. On July 2, 2009, Governor Patrick signed legislation designed to secure, maximize, and promptly release additional stimulus funds. Resulting from information provided by a taskforce to analyze the stimulus, the legislation will address the Act’s “‘use it or lose it’ deadlines, requiring states to use federal funds quickly or it will be reallocated to other states.” The recommendations to be enacted “are either federally mandated or will help to reap the maximum benefits of the federal act.” Click here for a more detailed description of the bill’s goals.

Despite the fact that new allocations for ARRA seem to be winding down, the opportunities for nonprofits are far from over.  Perhaps the most significant opportunities are the precedents that have been set regarding the means by which Washington has allocated funding. Despite the label of “one-time” funding that has been applied by national leaders, it is arguable that because of the precedent-setting nature of ARRA and the unprecedented investments in programs, there is every likelihood that ARRA will impact the way in which Washington allocates funding and addresses needs for years to come. Additionally, new (or newly strengthened) relationships forged between the nonprofit sector and federal, state, municipal government as well as new collaborations and partnerships between nonprofits will impact the way nonprofits operate in the future. Moreover, these relationships will almost certainly prove helpful in subsequent funding opportunities from the present stimulus package, a second stimulus package (if it happens) as well as funding opportunities via the Massachusetts state budget. Additionally, more openings could be made available as municipalities seek worthy places to invest their allotments of stimulus funding.

However, when approaching agencies that are serving as conduits for federal stimulus money (such as CAAs), it is important to realize that, in many cases, they are being overwhelmed by groups seeking subcontracting or partnership opportunities. Therefore it is important that nonprofits seek opportunities to provide value in detailing what services and results you can offer these conduit organizations.

Newsletter Volume 7 includes newly released information on deadlines and specific requirements of many of the federal grant opportunities previously referenced in past newsletters. However, because we seek to provide new and relevant information, categories without new announcements or information have not been included. We suggest that you refer back to previous newsletters in order to have a comprehensive understanding of all the funding available in your category of interest.

Finally, we are moving into a phase where grantees and others are being required to provide significant reporting back to funding sources. In addition to being a chief requirement imbedded in ARRA and repeated multiple times in RFPs, we suspect that stringent documentation of the success by nonprofits will serve to reassure the public at large about the value of ARRA and encourage additional funding opportunities in the future. In this newsletter you will find a comprehensive list of information, including webinars, detailing many of these reporting processes.

If there is information that is not contained in this or previous newsletters which you would like us to know and/or to transmit to others, please email us at info@massnonprofitnet.org.

Funds Allocated to Date

Agency Announced $(Thousand)
Made Available Paid Out
Department of Health and Human Services $1,650,904 $1,689,346 $846,959
Department of Education $1,647,867 $1,083,021 $429,183
Department of Housing and Urban Development $344,958 $206,233 $49,490
Department of Agriculture $13,748 $53,999 $43,526
Department of Justice $36,795 $38,617 $12,703
Department of Labor $78,935 $64,927 $2,294
Department of Transportation $757,534 $289,943 $1,667
National Science Foundation $0 $48,285 $1,395
Corporation for National and Community Service $696 $5,702 $2
Environmental Protection Agency $194,276 $196,272 $1
Railroad Retirement Board $938 $0 $0
US Army Corps of Engineers $5,335 $0 $0
National Endowment for the Arts $0 $1,036 $0
Department of Veterans Affairs $7,014 $0 $0
Department of Energy $245,319 $66,530 $0
Social Security Administration $288,230 $0 $0
General Services Administration $169,319 $0 $0
Department of Treasury $50,814 $54,614 $0
Department of the Interior $18,808 $0 $0
Department of Commerce $0 $1,363 $0
Department of Defense $62,080 $0 $0
Total $5,573,567 $3,799,889 $1,387,220

Reminder of Upcoming ARRA Deadlines

Please find below the upcoming deadlines for funding opportunities:

  • July 21st, 2009 – Energy Efficient Information and Communication Technology applications due
  • July 22nd, 2009 – Applications due for Regional Sequestration Technology Training Grants
  • July 27th, 2009 – Deadline for Measurement Science and Engineering Fellowship Program applications
  • July 29th, 2009 – Deadline for Wind Energy Consortia Grants between Institutions of Higher Learning and Industry
  • August 4th, 2009 – Applications due for The Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE)
  • August 5th, 2009 – Deadline for Green Capacity Building Grants
  • August 6th, 2009 – Deadline for Facilities Improvement Program
  • August 6th, 2009 – Deadline for Smart Grid Investment Grant Program
  • August 10th, 2009 – Full proposals due for NIST Research Construction Grants
  • August 14th, 2009 – Applications due for State Labor Market Information Improvement Grants
  • August 18th, 2009 – Deadline for receipt of application for Healthy Homes Technical Studies Grant
  • August 18th, 2009 – Deadline for Advanced Energy Efficient Building Technologies applications
  • Sept. 1st, 2009 – Applications due for round 2 of the Federal Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP).
  • Sept. 1st, 2009 – Deadline for competitive grant applications to buy and rehabilitate foreclosed properties and other projects to stabilize neighborhoods and create affordable housing
  • Sept. 1st, 2009 – Deadline for Early Career Research Program
  • Sept. 4th, 2009– Deadline for Energy Training Partnerships Grants
  • Sept. 17th, 2009 – Deadline for Core Facility Renovation, Repair and Improvements Grants
  • Sept. 24th, 2009 – Deadline for Academic Research Enhancement Awards
  • Sept. 29th, 2009 – Applications due for Pathways out of Poverty Grants
  • Sept. 30th, 2009 – Deadline for Habitat Restoration in Coastal Areas Competitive Grant
  • Sept. 30th, 2009 – Applications due for Fish Passage Grants
  • Oct. 15th, 2009 – Applications due for Protection of Human Health by Immunology and Vaccines Limited Competition Grants
  • Oct. 20th, 2009 – Deadline for State Energy Sector Partnerships and Training Grants
  • June 30th, 2010 – Deadline for EDA Economic Recovery Program applications
  • June 31st, 2010 – Applications will be accepted on a rolling basis up until this date for Boston’s Neighborhood Stabilization Program funds Deadline for Capital Improvement Program (CIP) for Community Health Centers

Health and Human Services

State Funding

Recovery Act Funding for Community Health Centers in Massachusetts
As mentioned in previous newsletters, The Recovery Act is providing massive amounts of funding for Community Health Centers across the country (approximately $2 billion at this time). As part of this effort to revitalize those buildings that need major capital improvements and increase the level of access, Massachusetts will be receiving upwards of $36 million dispersed between 36 health centers and cities. This funding comes from three separate grant programs: Capital Improvement Program (CIP), Increased Demand for Community Health Center Services (IDS) and New Access Points. It is expected that with the $8.6 million flowing into the state from the IDS grants alone, over 240 jobs will be created or saved, an estimated 61,787 new patients will be added as well as an additional 19,369 uninsured patients will be served in the funded health centers. Below is a more detailed account of the funding breakdown per health center. Please visit this site for more information.

Organization Name City Funding for New Access Point Funding for Increased Demand Funding for Capital Improvements
Boston Health Care For The Homeless, Inc. Boston $238,888 $705,735
Brockton Neighborhood Health Center Brockton $303,248 $828,025
Caring Health Center Springfield $195,379 $675,040
City of Springfield, Massachusetts Springfield $144,811 $386,045
Codman Square Health Center Dorchester Center $100,000 $923,645
Comm Hlth Cntr of Franklin County, Inc. Turners Falls $169,793 $495,420
Community Health Center of Cape Cod, Inc. Mashpee $145,410 $421,570
Community Health Connections, Inc. Fitchburg $298,757 $949,790
Community Health Programs, Inc. Great Barrington $183,780 $463,185
Community Healthlink, Inc. Worcester $126,381 $339,495
Dorchester House Multi-Service Center Dorchester $100,000 $901,315
Duffy Health Center, Inc. Hyannis $128,237 $334,490
East Boston Neighborhood Health Center East Boston $663,663 $1,927,515
Family Health Center of Worcester, Inc. Worcester $334,022 $1,002,885
Fenway Community Health Center Boston $185,065 $634,160
Great Brook Valley Health Center Worcester $416,643 $991,965
Greater Lawrence Family Health Center, Inc. Lawrence $393,755 $1,482,000
Greater New Bedford Community Health Center New Bedford $336,507 $1,111,700
Harbor Health Services Dorchester $332,826 $1,119,155
Healthfirst Family Care Center, Inc. Fall River $207,831 $658,345
Hilltown Community Health Center, Inc. Worthington $167,990 $520,480
HOLYOKE HEALTH CENTER, INC. Holyoke $293,281 $1,038,655
Joseph M. Smith Community Health Center Allston $288,216 $672,065
Lowell Community Health Center Lowell $274,972 $970,755
Lynn Community Health Center, Inc. Lynn $393,331 $1,328,350
MA League of Community Health Centers Boston $134,935 $301,835
Manet Community Health Center, Inc. Quincy $203,851 $719,140
Mattapan Community Health Center Mattapan $170,204 $490,835
New England Hospital DBA Dimock CHC Roxbury $208,607 $698,560
North End Community Health Committee, Inc. Boston $175,159 $524,505
North Shore Community Health, Inc. Salem $1,300,000 $196,615 $551,910
Outer Cape Heath Services, Inc. North Eastham $197,295 $592,860
Roxbury Comprehensive Com Hlth Cntr, Inc. Roxbury $171,689 $563,670
South Boston Community Health Center Boston $209,678 $755,680
South Cove Community Health Center, Inc. Boston $295,522 $1,057,380
Whittier Street Health Committee, Inc. Roxbury $232,253 $595,765
Total $1,300,000 $8,618,594 $27,733,925

HHS Funding for Massachusetts: 7/10/09

Below is chart with the most up-to-date funding from the HHS for Massachusetts. Included are both total obligations as well as total gross outlays to the state. This chart, similar to ones that have been included in past newsletters, are updated weekly and posted by HHS on their recovery website.

Bureau (Within HHS) TAFS Award Type Total Obligations Total Gross Outlays
Health Resources and Services Administration Health Resources and Services, Recovery Act Discretionary Grant $37,652,519.00 $947,022.40
National Institutes of Health National Library of Medicine Discretionary Grant $1,679,422.00 $0.00
National Institutes of Health John E. Fogarty International Center Discretionary Grant $131,760.00 $0.00
National Institutes of Health National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Discretionary Grant $286,420.00 $0.00
National Institutes of Health National Institute on Aging Discretionary Grant $214,527.00 $1,978.00
National Institutes of Health Office of the Director, Recovery Act Cooperative Agreement $7,950.00 $0.00
Institutes of Health Office of the Director, Recovery Act Discretionary Grant $1,436,300.00 $11,365.00
National Institutes of Health National Center for Research Resources, Recovery Act Discretionary Grant $9,397,663.00 $171,322.00
National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute Discretionary Grant $3,486,360.00 $13,086.00
National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences Discretionary Grant $678,491.00 $0.00
National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Discretionary Grant $155,985.00 $0.00
National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Discretionary Grant $6,132,504.00 $4,065.00
National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Cooperative Agreement $92,211.00 $34,700.00
National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Discretionary Grant $1,299,998.00 $83,000.00
National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Discretionary Grant $1,296,721.00 $6,930.00
National Institutes of Health National Institute of Bioimaging & Bioengineering Discretionary Grant $840,623.00 $0.00
National Institutes of Health National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Discretionary Grant $11,913,617.00 $178,018.00
National Institutes of Health National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Discretionary Grant $2,876,601.00 $0.00
National Institutes of Health National Eye Institute Discretionary Grant $1,848,988.00 $0.00
National Institutes of Health National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders Discretionary Grant $44,344.00 $0.00
National Institutes of Health National Institute of Mental Health Discretionary Grant $668,321.00 $0.00
National Institutes of Health National Institute on Drug Abuse Discretionary Grant $1,734,716.00 $6,647.00
National Institutes of Health National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Discretionary Grant $209,700.00 $0.00
National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Discretionary Grant $1,200,061.00 $0.00
Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Grants to States for Medicaid, Recovery Act Entitlements $1,538,049,179.00 $842,543,369.00
Administration for Children and Families Payments to States for Child Support Enforcement and Family Supp Entitlements $4,360,662.00 $234,368.94
Administration for Children and Families Payments to States for the Child Care and Development Block Gran Formula and Block Grant $23,971,658.00 $0.00
Administration for Children and Families Children and Families Services Programs, Recovery Act Discretionary Grant $4,723,043.00 $0.00
Administration for Children and Families Children and Families Services Programs, Recovery Act Formula and Block Grant $24,922,586.00 $0.00
Administration for Children and Families Payment to States for Foster Care and Adoption Assistance, Recov Entitlements $5,938,399.00 $2,723,232.16
Administration on Aging Aging Services Programs, Recovery Act Formula and Block Grant $2,094,570.00 $0.00
Totals $1,689,345,899.00 $846,959,103.50

Competitive Grants

Facility Investment Program
Change of date: August 06, 2009. Click here for more information.

Energy and Environment

State Funding

Weatherization Programs in Massachusetts
Massachusetts has recently received an additional $49 million in federal recovery funds for the weatherization assistance programs in Massachusetts. This brings the total Recovery Act funding for weatherization assistance programs to $122 million, enabling the state to reach its goal of weatherizing 16,900 homes over the next three years. These funds will be focused on the homes of low-income citizens, lowering energy costs, while boosting the green sector of the economy. Families who are eligible for the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) will be able to apply to their local LIHEAP provider for the building assistance. DHCD has set aside an additional $25 million to weatherize over 3,800 units in state-assisted public housing developments.  Another $6 million is reserved for affordable housing units in expiring use-restricted developments. This fund will also be used to support the training of green collar jobs. For more information click here or here.

Competitive Grants

Advanced Energy Efficient Building Technologies
The Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), on behalf of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s (EERE) Building Technologies Program (BTP), is soliciting applications from organizations to manage programs on Advanced Energy Efficient Building Technologiesthat fall under one of the following six Areas of Interest:

  1. Advanced Building Control Strategies, Communications and Information Technologies for Net-Zero Energy Buildings
  2. Analysis, Design and Technical Tools
  3. Building Envelope and Windows
  4. Residential and Commercial HVAC and Crosscutting Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Research
  5. Water Heating, Residential and Commercial Appliances and MELs
  6. Solar Heating and Cooling (SHC)

Within these six areas of interest there are several more specific subtopics per Area of Interest. Approximately $25-$75 million will be available for this funding project; however the DOE does expect grantees to share 20-50% of the cost depending on their topic or subtopic of interest. Just as with all Recovery Act funding, projects are expected to create new employment opportunities, be ready to start immediately and have a time period of 1-3 years. Applications are due August 18, 2009. Please clickhere for more information.

Energy Efficient Information and Communication Technology
Currently, data centers and telecom systems comprise about 3% of our country’s electricity use. As the use of information technology and communications services grow throughout the world, the control centers that support these information and communications technology (ICT) systems will face higher demand for electricity. The DOE is soliciting applications from organizations that are able to radically improve the energy efficiency of ICT systems, with a focus on developing new technology that could be rapidly commercialized within the next 3-5 years. Applications are due by July 21, 2009. Click here for more information.

Smart Grid Investment Grant Program
The Department of Energy is accepting proposals from a variety of applicants to modernize the country’s electrical transmission systems and to improve the smart grid technologies that currently exist by increasing the amount of research and investments in this technology. Grants will be awarded through a competitive process and assist with up to 50% of project costs. Applications will be accepted up until August 06, 2009. Click here for more information.

Education

State Funding

Race to the Top
On July 16, Gov. Patrick unveiled an education proposal largely meant to strengthen the Commonwealth’s position as it competes with other states for $4.35 billion in federal “Race to the Top” funds being made available through ARRA.  The Governor proposes to increase the number of available slots for students in state-sponsored charter schools to 37,000, from 10,000. As a part of this plan, the lowest-scoring 10 percent of school districts would be able to double the percentage of school spending that they devote to charter tuition, from 9 to 18 percent. Charter schools are independent public schools that operate under five year charters granted by the Commonwealth’s Board of Education. Charter schools are usually proposed by teachers, school leaders, parents, non-profit organizations, or other members of the community.

As states compete for the money available under the Race to the Top Fund, their applications will be evaluated on the basis of these four reforms: 1. improved standards and tests; 2. improved effectiveness of teachers; 3. better use of data to inform educators’ decisions; and 4. addressing low-performing schools.  Race to the Top grants under ARRA will be made in two rounds-fall 2009 and spring 2010.  The deadline for the first phase of the Race to the Top grant proposal is October 1, 2009. Ten percent of the funds will be awarded to an initial group of states in early 2010. A second phase grant proposal for 90% of the funds will be in spring of 2010. Implementation of the Race to the Top grant is expected to take place over the next four years.

Please click here for more information on this grant or here for more information on the different funding phases.

Broadband Initiative
ARRA provides the Rural Utilities Services (RUS), and the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) with $7.2 billion to expand access to broadband services in the United States.  $2.5 billion of the funding will be used by RUS for a Broadband Initiatives Program (BIP) which will offer loans, grants, and loan/grant combinations to facilitate broadband deployment in rural areas. $4.7 billion will be used by NTIA for a Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP) which makes available grants for deploying broadband infrastructure in unserved and underserved areas in the United States, enhancing broadband capacity at public computer centers, and promoting sustainable broadband adoption projects. Both programs are ideally suited for nonprofits to provide services and/or subcontract services and/or benefit from the end goals of the program.  Applications will be accepted between July 14, 2009, at 8 a.m. Eastern Time (ET) until August 14, 2009, at 5 p.m. ET.

Under BIP, RUS will award grants, loans, and loan/grant combinations for broadband infrastructure proposing to exclusively serve remote, unserved, rural areas. Under BTOP funds are available through three categories of eligible projects: Broadband Infrastructure, Public Computer Centers, and Sustainable Broadband Adoption.The Broadband Infrastructure category will fund projects to deliver broadband access to unserved and underserved areas. The Public Computer Center category will fund projects that expand public access to broadband service and enhance broadband capacity at entities, such as community colleges and public libraries, and nonprofits, which permit the public to use these computing centers. The Sustainable Broadband Adoption category will fund innovative projects that promote broadband demand, including projects focused on providing broadband education, awareness, training, access, equipment or support, particularly among vulnerable population groups where broadband technology has traditionally been underutilized.

NTIA expects to distribute grants across geographic areas and expects to support projects employing a range of technologies (e.g., fixed and mobile wireless, fiber, satellite).  NTIA will also employ a two-step application review process. First, NTIA will conduct an initial screen of applications to determine whether an application meets the mandatory threshold requirements. In step two, the remaining applicants will be asked to submit additional information which will be reviewed by NTIA staff with the support of external engineering, business, and subject-matter experts. During step two of the BTOP application process, the Governor’s office of each state will receive a list of the applications under consideration in order to communicate which proposals meet the greatest needs of the state.

BTOP-Public Computer Centers
For the purposes of BTOP grant funds, applicants requesting a Public Computer Center grant must have a project that provides broadband access to the general public or a specific vulnerable population, such as low-income, unemployed, aged, children, minorities and people with disabilities. Projects must create or expand a public computer center meeting a specific public need for broadband service, including but not limited to education, employment, economic development, and enhanced service for health-care delivery, children, and vulnerable populations.

Grantees may use BTOP funding under this project category to expand computer center capacity by:

  • Acquiring broadband-related equipment, instrumentation, networking capability, hardware and software, and digital network technology for broadband services;
  • Developing and providing training, education, support and awareness programs or web-based resources;
  • Facilitating access to broadband services, including, but not limited to, making public computer centers accessible to the disabled; and

BTOP-Sustainable Broadband Adoption
Applications for Sustainable Broadband Adoption projects need to demonstrate a sustainable increase in demand for and subscribership to broadband services. Projects should meet a specific public need for broadband service, including, but not limited to, education, employment, economic development, and enhanced service for health-care delivery, children, and vulnerable populations. Projects should describe the barriers to adoption in a given area, especially among vulnerable populations, and propose an innovative and persuasive solution to encourage adoption. Applicants might show how variations on one or more proven demand stimulation strategy-such as awareness-building, development of relevant content, and demand aggregation-would promote sustainable adoption.

Grantees may use BTOP funding under this project category to encourage sustainable adoption of broadband services by:

  • Acquiring broadband-related equipment, hardware and software, and digital network technology for broadband services;
  • Developing and providing training, education, support and awareness programs or web-based content;
  • Conducting broadband-related public education, outreach, support and awareness campaigns; Implementing innovative programs to facilitate greater access to broadband service, devices, and equipment.

For more information please see this site.

Higher Education

Federal Funding

American Graduation Initiative
President Obama recently revealed his newest goal for America to reclaim its position as having the highest proportion of college graduates by 2020, striving for an additional five million community college graduates. The American Graduation Initiative will create the Community College Challenge Fund, which will award competitive grants to states and community colleges to further their efforts and implement proven reforms.

Such encouraged innovations include expanding relationships with businesses and workforce investment systems to create job placements and career pathways for graduates, additional course offerings, expansion of dual enrollment programs for high school students and the syncing of graduation and entrance requirements with high schools.

Over the next ten years, the White House expects to expend over $12 billion in funding for this initiative. This funding would be part of a larger package, which would increase the number of Pell grants and streamline the loan process in an effort to reduce costs.

This initiative would also create a new research center that would undertake the effort of determining new methods in which to assess the achievement of community colleges. The center would also fund new approaches to promote college completion, renovation of community college campuses and develop a new online skills laboratory.

Please read this article or visit this site for more information.

Labor and Workforce Development

State Funding

Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission (MRC) Funding
The Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission received $3.2 million in funding from the Federal government to expand its vocational rehabilitation program for people with disabilities. Currently there are approximately 15,000 individuals living with disabilities who would like begin, or return, to work. This funding would allow the MRC to redevelop its work training programs on a large scale. Among the MRC’s goals, it hopes to convert its existing management system with a more efficient web-based, reducing the lag between the time that applications are received and processed as well as allow for off-site consultations and case management for counseling staff. This new system should reduce administrative costs and inefficiencies. The federal funding will also allow the MRC to update their marketing materials and form a partnership with University of Massachusetts to establish ties to local businesses and training centers. Generally, funding will be focused on the redevelopment of vocational rehabilitation centers to be more efficient, have better training and increase the number of disabled citizens working in Massachusetts. It is estimated that for every dollar put into the program, five dollars are gained in income tax and saved in reduced dependence on public services. Please see this press release for more information.

Competitive Grants

Early Career Research Program
The Office of Science of the Department of Energy has created this program to support in Early Career Research Programs that focus on: Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), Biological and Environmental Research (BER), Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Fusion Energy Sciences (FES); High Energy Physics (HEP), and Nuclear Physics (NP). However any nonprofit organizations described in section 501(c)(4) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 that engaged in lobbying activities after December 31, 1995 are ineligible to apply for this grant program. Applications however, must be submitted through a U.S. academic institution and are due September 01, 2009. Please see the full list of restrictions on eligibility. Click here for more information.

Housing and Community Development

Municipalities

City Applications for Neighborhood Stabilization Program – 2 Funds
The City of Boston will be submitting an application for the Neighborhood Stabilization Program-2, a fund that has been discussed in previous newsletters. The city is applying for $20 million. Please go to the Boston’s Recovery website here to see more details.

The City of Worcester will also be submitting an application for additional NSP2 funding. They are applying for $10 million. To  and receive more information on the City’s NSP Plan and its status, please contact The City of Worcester, City Manager’s Division of Neighborhood & Housing Development, 44 Front Street, Suite 520, Worcester, Massachusetts 01608, or to EONS@ci.worcester.ma.us, Attn. Dennis E. Hennessy, Director or Scott Hayman, Housing Director. For more information please visit the city’s website.

New Market Tax Credit Program
Rockland Trust Community Development Corp., recently received $50 million in tax credits through the New Market Tax Credit program, an economic development program created in 2000 that was recently bolstered by The ARRA. Rockland Trust lends to low-income communities in southeastern Massachusetts and Rhode Island. It was one of 32 organizations across the country to receive these new tax credits. With these tax credits it will now be able to fund new loans for low-income communities. For more information please click here or here.

State Funding

Neighborhood Stabilization Programs (NSPs)
Massachusetts has already been awarded a total of $54.8 million in funding from the Housing and Economic Recovery Act (HERA) through the Neighborhood Stabilization Program-1 for the state and four cities. It has requested for these funds to be released and the following list details the breakdown of the funding:

  • Massachusetts – $43.47 million
  • Boston – $4.23 million
  • Brockton – $2.15 million
  • Springfield – $2.57 million
  • Worcester – $2.39 million

Including these four cities there are 39 communities considered to have the highest need for NSP1 funds. The state will be able to dole out to the 35 communities not awarded separate block grants from the $43.47 million awarded to the state. Those 35 communities include:

    • Lowell
    • Lawrence
    • New Bedford
    • Lynn
    • Haverhill
    • Fitchburg
    • Framingham
    • Barnstable
    • Plymouth
    • Marlborough
    • Revere
    • Everett
    • Methuen
    • Weymouth
    • Chicopee
    • Leominster
    • Quincy
    • Milford
    • Randolph
    • Attleborough
    • Yarmouth
    • Wareham
    • Salem
    • Billerica
    • Fall River
    • Saugus
    • Dracut
    • Somerville
    • Chelsea
    • Peabody
    • Taunton
    • Holyoke
    • Stoughton
    • Falmouth
    • Marshfield

Massachusetts, through the Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD), is also planning on applying for NSP2 funding. Similar to NSP1, these funds will be allocated towards the acquisition and redevelopment of foreclosed properties. The following communities are the focus of this application:

  • Athol
  • Gardner
  • North Adams
  • Orange
  • Pittsfield
  • Southbridge
  • Webster
  • West Springfield
  • Winchendon

For this application, The DHCD is collaborating on this proposal with the Massachusetts Housing Partnership for additional NSP2 funds. You can direct any questions or comments to Mark.Siegenthaler@state.ma.us. Also, please click here orhere for more information.

Tax credit exchange funds for construction and rehabilitation of affordable housing development
On July 10th, it was announced that Massachusetts will receive $50.8 million from ARRA to finance new construction and the rehabilitation of affordable housing developments currently stalled due to the lack of equity available in the low-income housing tax credit market. The funds, issued by the U.S. Treasury Department will be used in exchange for unsold tax credits to help fill the gaps for project sponsors who were relying on the sale of those credits to fund a substantial portion of their project development costs.

The Massachusetts Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) will implement the program and estimates that over the next 12 to 18 months, up to 300 housing units will be built.  With pending approval from the Treasury Department, it is expected that tax credit exchange funds will be awarded to project sponsors through a competitive process that DHCD hopes will begin in August.  All funds must be expended by December 31, 2010

For more information please click here.

Useful Information for Current and Prospective ARRA Grantees

OMB Announces Recovery Act Reporting Webinars
On July 13th, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and the Recovery, Accountability, and Transparency Board announced that Webinars will be held the week of July 20, 2009, to provide information on implementing the guidance set forth in OMB Memorandum M-09-21, Implementing Guidance for the Reports on Use of Funds Pursuant to the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, released on June 22, 2009. If you are unable to attend the sessions listed below, the Webinars will be posted on the Recovery.gov website to view at your convenience.

The intended audience for these webinars includes Federal agency personnel, prime recipients and sub-recipients.  However, it is likely that this information will provide everyone with a better understanding of goals and expectations of federal agencies, information that will likely assist those who might seek federal ARRA funding in the future. Each OMB Webinar will focus on a major section of the guidance and the technology solution for central reporting.To register for an OMB Webinar session, please visit the Recovery Act Web site at http://www.recovery.gov/?q=node/658. Attendees are encouraged to register in advance for the live sessions as space will be limited.

Webinar Schedule – Date, Time and Title of Webinar

July 20, 2009
10:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Section 1 – General Information

2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m.
Section 2 – Basic Principles and Requirements of Recovery Act Recipient Reporting

Section 5 – Reporting on Jobs Creation Estimates by Recipients

July 21, 2009
10:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Section 3 – Recipient Reporting Process

2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m.
Technology Solution from an Agency Perspective

July 22, 2009
10:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Technology Solution from a Prime Recipient Perspective

2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m.
Technology Solution from a Sub-Recipient Perspective

July 23, 2009
10:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Section 4 – Data Quality Requirements

Press Release from The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention is a component of the Office of Justice Programs in the U.S. Department of Justice July 8, 2009. Please click here for more information.

Helpful websites:

Full list of federal grants available through the Recovery Act

Medicaid and Healthcare

Nutrition

Housing, Infrastructure, Economic Development

Unemployment Services:

Environment and Energy:

Register Now:

  • November 13 – MNN / Associated Grant Makers Annual Conference – “Grantmakers and Grantees for the Common Good” | Sheraton Framingham

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Federal Stimulus Act–Newsletter6

Federal Stimulus Act–Newsletter5

Stimulus and Nonprofits, Vol. 5 – MNN’s ARRA Newsletter – June 11, 2009

Dear Nonprofit Leader,

This email contains a few updates from the Vol. 5 your recieved last night.  I hope that you made good use of MNN’s  ARRA Newsletter, Volumes 1 and 2, 3 and 4. Today we present Volume 5 of our research on the opportunities for nonprofits to participate in the economic recovery of our country. Please let us know if is useful and how it can be made more so and please share it.

Again, thank you to The Boston Foundation for generously providing financial support for this needed  project.

Dave Magnani,
Executive Director, 617-330-1188

To view Stimulus and Nonprofits, Volume 1, 2, 3 and 4 or for more information on the Massachusetts Nonprofit Network, please visit our website.

If this edition has been forwarded to you and you would like to receive future volumes please email us your name and organization.

Not a member? Please consider joining to sustain this and other programs.

Where we are right now.

In the past couple of weeks, Massachusetts has seen few increases in the allocation of its American Recovery and Reinvestment Act allotment. To date, $2.92 billion of the scheduled $8.7 billion has been dispersed to Massachusetts (approximately 33%), a figure that has not changed since our last update. Despite the slow pace of funding distribution since ARRA’s enactment a few months ago, it is expected that this pace will increase dramatically in the coming weeks.

On June 8th, 2009 President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden announced “Roadmap to Recovery,” a plan designed to rapidly accelerate ARRA’s implementation. While a purported  150,000 jobs have been “created or saved” in the first 100 days since ARRA’s passage, the White House hopes to quadruple that figure in the next one hundred days, indicating that funds will be released quickly. Saying he’s not satisfied with the progress, Obama delivered a set of marching orders to his Cabinet: cut red tape and ramp up hundreds of public works and other projects designed to stabilize the economy and reduce unemployment. Currently, $135 billion of the $787 billion or 17% of the recovery funds have been secured or spent, but the administration has set a goal of 70% to be expended by the summer of 2010. It is expected that this acceleration of funding will effect direct federal stimulus funding on infrastructure projects in the pipeline, direct federal formula grant funding such as money for summer jobs as well as competitive grants for the state and individual entities (including nonprofits) in Massachusetts.

Due to the fact that a substantial majority of ARRA funding is being delivered directly to Massachusetts and its municipalities through pre-existing relationships, it is crucial that nonprofit organizations cultivate relationships with government entities. Only through these partnerships can the most be made of ARRA’s opportunities, as many grants have rigid guidelines and requirements that must be met.

Newsletter volume 5 includes newly released information on deadlines and specific requirements of many of the federal grant opportunities previously referenced in past newsletters. However, because we seek to provide new and relevant information, categories without new announcements or information have not been included. We suggest that you refer back to previous newsletters in order to have a comprehensive understanding of all the funding available in your category of interest.

If there is information that is not contained in this or previous newsletters which you would like us to know and/or to transmit to others, please email us at info@massnonprofitnet.org.

Reminder of Upcoming ARRA Deadlines

Please find below the upcoming deadlines for funding opportunities:

  • June 15th, 2009 – Deadline for Enabling National Networking of Scientists and Resource Discovery Grants
  • June 15th, 2009 – HUD will start accepting applications for funding requests to green retrofit multi-family housing that is already HUD-assisted
  • June 25th, 2009 – Deadline for Energy Efficiency and Conservation competitive grant program
  • June 25th, 2009 – Letter of Intent outlining the proposed project due for NIST Research Construction Grants
  • June 26th, 2009 – Deadline for Community Services Block Grant Training and Technical Assistance Program
  • June 26th, 2009 – Deadline for Notice of Intent to Apply for Teacher Quality Partnership (TQP) Grants Program
  • June 30th, 2009 – Deadline for NCMHD Community Participation in Health Disparities Intervention Research Planning
  • July 1st, 2009 – Deadline for NCMHD Exploratory Centers of Excellence Grants
  • July 2nd, 2009 – Deadline for National Service Training and Technical Assistance
  • July 7th, 2009 – Deadline for the Strengthening Communities Fund applications
  • July 13th, 2009 – Applications due for NIST Recovery Act Measurement Science and Engineering Research Grants Program: Providing the Technology Infrastructure to Address National Priorities.
  • July 17th, 2009 – Applications due for Federal Neighborhood Stabilization Program 2 (NSP2)
  • July 22nd, 2009 – Applications due for Regional Sequestration Technology Training Grants
  • July 27th, 2009 – Deadline for Measurement Science and Engineering Fellowship Program applications
  • July 29th, 2009 – Deadline for Wind Energy Consortia Grants between Institutions of Higher Learning and Industry
  • August 4th, 2009 – Applications due for The Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE)
  • August 10th, 2009 – Full proposals due for NIST Research Construction Grants
  • Sept. 1st, 2009 – Applications due for round 2 of the Federal Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP).
  • Sept. 1st, 2009 – Deadline for competitive grant applications to buy and rehabilitate foreclosed properties and other projects to stabilize neighborhoods and create affordable housing
  • Sept. 17th, 2009 – Deadline for Core Facility Renovation, Repair and Improvements Grants
  • Sept. 24th, 2009 – Deadline for Academic Research Enhancement Awards
  • Sept. 30th, 2009 – Deadline for Habitat Restoration in Coastal Areas Competitive Grant
  • June 30th, 2010 – Deadline for EDA Economic Recovery Program applications
  • June 31st, 2010 – Applications will be accepted on a rolling basis up until this date for Boston’s Neighborhood Stabilization Program funds Deadline for Capital Improvement Program (CIP) for   Community Health Centers

Strengthening Nonprofits

Competitive Grants

National Service Training and Technical Assistance
The Corporation for National and Community Service has announced the availability of approximately $8 million in funds to support national providers of training and technical assistance for community service programs that use service and volunteering to meet community needs.

The Corporation will award cooperative agreements in five categories to organizations with the capacity and demonstrated expertise to deliver training and technical assistance in one or more of the categories. Organizations may include grantees and potential grantees, sub-grantees, sponsoring organizations and projects, and participants and members in programs administered by the Corporation including AmeriCorps, VISTA, National Civilian Community Corps (NCCC), RSVP, Foster Grandparents, Senior Companions, and Learn and Serve America and in support of other special initiatives of the Corporation.

Among other provisions of the recently passed Edward M. Kennedy Serve America Act the law, is the reauthorization and expansion of the Senior Corps, AmeriCorps, and Learn and Serve America programs. The new law also puts AmeriCorps on a path to grow from 75,000 to 250,000 positions by 201 and increases opportunities for students and older Americans to serve.

The legislation is likely to affect the scope and nature of the cooperative agreements that will result from this competition. The Corporation is particularly interested in “new approaches and cutting edge technologies that will creatively support new initiatives and cost-effectively support expansion of national service and the non-profit sector.” Organizations selected through this competition will work with and support current and future training and technical assistance provider organizations. Providers use their technical expertise and/or capacity to deliver services primarily through web-based and other distance learning approaches and through targeted face to face training.

The 5 categories are: Technology/Knowledge Management including Specialized Service Learning Services (Approximately $2.5 million for year one, including at least $750,000 for specialized service-learning services); Training Support (Approximately $3.5 million for year one); Training and Technical Assistance to AmeriCorps State*National Programs (Approximately $ 1 million for year one); Effective Practices in Disability and Inclusion Services (Approximately $1 million for year one); and Return on Investment for Managing Volunteers. (Approximately $100,000 for year one).

The grant competition is open to state and local government entities, non-profit organizations, including faith- and community-based organizations, higher education institutions,and commercial entities. Organizations that operate or intend to operate Corporation supported programs are also eligible to apply.

The deadline for eGrants submissions is 5:00 p.m. Eastern Time on July 2, 2009. For more info click here.

Health and Human Services

Recently released activity reports from the United States Department of Health and Human Services are allowing us to see more clearly what funds are being made available to Massachusetts, how they will be dispersed amongst different programs, and how much has already been delivered.  Currently the State is set to receive more than $1.3 billion in Federal HHS funding which will be divided into twenty-nine different programs. The vast majority of the HHS funds, in dollar amounts, are devoted to Medicaid (more about Medicaid under the Recovery Act below), while other significant portions include money for: child care, family services, infectious disease, and  health research and resources.  To date, 56% or $748 million of Massachusetts’ funds have been paid out, although this money has gone almost exclusively to Medicaid (99.6%).  See the chart below for a complete breakdown of funding allocated to Massachusetts from HHS.

HHS American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Massachusetts Expenditures for Week of June 5, 2009
Agency / Bureau TAFS Award Type Total Obligations Total Gross Outlays
Department of Health and Human Services: Health Resources and Services Administration Health Resources and Services, Recovery Act Discretionary Grant $9,918,594 $596,768
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health National Library of Medicine Discretionary Grant $1,594,006 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health John E. Fogarty International center Discretionary Grant $131,760 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health NationalInstitute ofChild Health and Human Development Discretionary Grant $242,833 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health National Institute on Aging Discretionary Grant $208,485 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health Office of the Director, Recovery Act Discretionary Grant $1,166,582 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health NationalCenterfor Research Resources, Recovery Act Discretionary Grant $9,397,663 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute Discretionary Grant $2,784,802 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health NationalInstitute ofGeneral Medical Sciences Discretionary Grant $540,705 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Discretionary Grant $88,000 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Discretionary Grant $6,268,605 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Cooperative Agreements $92,211 $5,000
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Discretionary Grant $1,299,998 $45,000
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health NationalInstitute ofDiabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Discretionary Grant $912,860 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health National Institute of Bioimaging & Bioengineering Discretionary Grant $761,135 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health NationalInstitute ofAllergy and Infectious Diseases Discretionary Grant $9,392,100 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Discretionary Grant $2,876,601 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health National Eye Institute Discretionary Grant $1,769,162 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders Discretionary Grant $44,344 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health National Institute of Mental Health Discretionary Grant $668,321 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health National Institute on Drug Abuse Discretionary Grant $1,492,691 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Discretionary Grant $209,700 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health NationalCenterfor Complementary and Alternative Medicine Discretionary Grant $1,200,061 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Grants to States for Medicaid, Recovery Act Entitlements $1,227,300,179 $745,102,457
Department of Health and Human Services: Administration for Children and Families Payments to States for Child Support Enforcement and Family Supp Entitlements $1,868,993 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: Administration for Children and Families Payments to States for the Child Care and Development Block Gran Formula and Block Grant $23,971,658 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: Administration for Children and Families Children and Families Services Programs, Recovery Act Formula and Block Grant $24,922,586 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: Administration for Children and Families Payment to States for Foster Care and Adoption Assistance, Recov Entitlements $4,731,405 $2,695,181
Department of Health and Human Services: Administration on Aging Aging Services Programs, Recovery Act Formula and Block Grant $506,640 $0
TOTAL $1,336,362,680 $748,444,406

Medicaid
HHS reported that as of May 29th cumulative ARRAMedicaidFMAPState draw downs total $18.6 billion (out of a total $87 billion). The Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) at HHS calculates the temporary FMAP increases quarterly. ASPE then provides these FMAPs to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, which uses them to determine the amount of Federal funds to award to States through the Medicaid grant process. For the first two quarters of FY 2009, ASPE identified the FMAP “hold harmless” figure (the higher of the published FMAPs for FYs 2008 and 2009 for each State), added an across-the-board increase of 6.2 percentage points, and then calculated additional relief based on increases in States’ average monthly unemployment rates.  The present unemployment rate in Massachusetts as of April was 8%, a 0.3% increase from the previous month, and a 3.2% increase from one year ago. Massachusetts currently ranks 28th in the nation for unemployment.
HHS is continuing to review spending plans and could announce and/or begin releasing funds for additional ARRA programs. Moreover, as of May 29th, there were 16 open ARRA  funding opportunity announcements on Grants.gov, totaling about $1.7 billion.

HHS reminds grantees that as a condition of receipt of funds, contractors that receive awards (or modifications to existing awards) funded, in whole or in part by the Recovery Act, must report information on a quarterly basis including, but not limited to:

    (a) The dollar amount of contractor invoices;
    (b) The supplies delivered and services performed;
    (c) An assessment of the completion status of the work;
    (d) An estimate of the number of jobs created and the number of jobs retained as a result of the Recovery Act funds;
    (e) Names and total compensation of each of the five most highly compensated officers for the calendar year in which the contract is awarded; and
    (f) Specific information on first-tier subcontractors.

State Funding

Increased funding for National Health Service Corp.
During her recent visit to Massachusetts, HHS Secretary Sebelius announced the availability of nearly $200 million from ARRA to support student loan repayments for primary care medical, dental and mental health clinicians who want to work at National Health Service Corps (NHSC) sites. Since its inception nearly 40 years ago, the NHSC has provided scholarships and loan repayments for more than 30,000 doctors, dentists and other health professionals who provide health care in the most geographically isolated and economically distressed regions of the country. The new funds are expected to double the number of Corps clinicians and make 3,300 awards to clinicians that serve in health centers, rural health clinics and other health care facilities that care for uninsured and underserved people.

The National Health Service Corps Loan Repayment Program provides $50,000 (or the outstanding balance of qualifying student loans if it is less than $50,000), tax free, to primary care medical, dental and mental health clinicians in exchange for two years of service at an approved site in a Health Professional Shortage Area. Upon completion of the service commitment, clinicians may be eligible to apply for additional support for extended service.

Qualifying health professionals include:

  • Physician
  • Primary Care Nurse Practitioner
  • Certified Nurse-Midwife
  • Primary Care Physician Assistant
  • Dentist
  • Dental Hygienist
  • Health Service Psychologist
  • Licensed Clinical Social Worker
  • Psychiatric Nurse Specialist
  • Marriage and Family Therapist
  • Licensed Professional Counselor

You can apply if you are already working at an approved site or seeking employment at a site that is either approved or meets site eligibility requirements and plans to become approved. Many types of health care facilities are approved NHSC sites. To see a list of opportunities available by state, go here.

Those interested in applying for loan repayments should visit this site.

Independent Living Recovery Funds
ARRA appropriates significant $140 million in new funding for the Independent Living (IL) programs authorized under Title VII of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. The IL programs support services to individuals with significant disabilities and older individuals who are blind to maximize their leadership, empowerment, independence, and productivity, and to promote the integration and full inclusion of individuals with disabilities into the mainstream of American society. In Massachusetts, Independent Living Centers (ILCs) are private, nonprofit, consumer-controlled, community-based organizations providing services and advocacy by and for persons with all types of disabilities. Their goal is twofold; to create opportunities to promote independence and to assist individuals with disabilities to achieve their maximum level of independent functioning within their families and/or communities.

The ARRA funds provide an unprecedented opportunity to implement innovative strategies to improve and expand IL services for individuals with significant disabilities and older individuals who are blind. Under the ARRA, the funds are provided under three authorities:

  • StateIL Services Program (State IL Grants): $18,200,000. Massachusetts will receive an additional $286,391 of this funding.
  • IL Services for Older Individuals Who Are Blind Program (OIB): $34,300,000. Massachusetts will receive $778,450 of this funding.
  • Centers for Independent Living Program (CIL): $87,500,000. Massachusetts CIL will receive $1,813,351 of this funding.

DOE awarded the ARRA funds available under the State IL Grants and OIB programs on April 1, 2009. These awards are in addition to the regular FY 2009 awards for these programs, and together, these awards will constitute a state’s total FY 2009 allocation for the State IL Grants and OIB programs. States are eligible to receive ARRA funds under these programs based on their approved State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) and OIB applications and the provision of the certification required by section 1607 of the ARRA. The assurances in a state’s SPIL and OIB application, as well as the requirements of the ARRA, will apply to the use of ARRA funds.

Information about each State’s formula allocation under the State IL Grants and OIB programs is available here. This website also provides information about the State Fiscal Stabilization Fund (SFSF) under the ARRA, which is different than IL funding.

Local/Municipalities

Community Health Centers Breakdown of IDS Formula Grants
Below is a list of all the Increased Demand for Services funding for each of the community health centers in Massachusetts.

It is our understanding that many community health centers in Massachusetts have also applied for one-time competitive Capital Improvement Program (CIP) grants to be made available from a pool of $850 million to support a 2-year project/budget period.  The due date for submission of CIP grant proposals was June 2, 2009.

County Grantee Program Amount
Barnstable Community Health Center of Cape Cod Inc. ARRA Increased Demand for Services $145,410.00
Duffy Health Center Inc. Increased Demand for Services $128,237.00
Outer Cape Health Services Inc. Increased Demand for Services $197,295.00
Berkshire Greater New Bedford Community Health Center Increased Demand for Services $336,507.00
Healthfirst Family Care Center Increased Demand for Services $207,831.00
Essex Greater Lawrence Family Health Center Inc. Increased Demand for Services $393,755.00
Lynn Community Health Center Inc. Increased Demand for Services $393,331.00
North Shore Community Health Inc. New Access Points $1,300,000.00
North Shore Community Health Inc. Increased Demand for Services $196,615.00
Franklin Community Health Center of Franklin County Increased Demand for Services $169,793.00
Hampden County Caring Health Center Increased Demand for Services $195,379.00
City of Springfield, MA Increased Demand for Services $144,811.00
Holyoke Health Center Inc. Increased Demand for Services $293,281.00
Hampshire Hilltown Community Health Center Inc. Increased Demand for Services $167,990.00
Middlesex Lowell Community Health Center Increased Demand for Services $274,972.00
Norfolk Manet Community Health Center Inc Increased Demand for Services $203,851.00
Plymouth Brockton Neighborhood Health Center Increased Demand for Services $303,248.00
Suffolk Boston Healthcare for the Homeless Inc. Increased Demand for Services $238,888.00
Codman Square Health Center Increased Demand for Services $100,000.00
Dorchester House Multi-Service Center Increased Demand for Services $100,000.00
East Boston Neighborhood Health Center Increased Demand for Services $663,663.00
Fenway Community Health Center Increased Demand for Services $185,065.00
Harbor Health Seervices Increased Demand for Services $332,826.00
Joseph M. Smith Community Health Center Increased Demand for Services $288,216.00
MA League of Community Health Centers Increased Demand for Services $134,935.00
Mattapan Community Health Center Increased Demand for Services $170,204.00
New England Hospital DBA Dimock CHC Increased Demand for Services $208,607.00
North End Community Health Committee Inc. Increased Demand for Services $175,159.00
Roxbury Comprehensive Community Health Center Increased Demand for Services $171,689.00
South Boston Community Health Center Increased Demand for Services $209,678.00
South Cove Community Health Center Inc. Increased Demand for Services $295,522.00
Whittier Street Health Committee Increased Demand for Services $232,253.00
Worcester Community Health Connections Inc. Increased Demand for Services $298,757.00
Community Healthlink Inc. Increased Demand for Services $126,381.00
Family Health Center of Worcester Inc. Increased Demand for Services $334,022.00
Great Brook Valley Health Center Increased Demand for Services $416,643.00
Total $9,734,814.00

Labor and Workforce Development

Municipalities/Localities

On May 27th,   Secretary Bump announced all regional allocations of the $67 million dollars in statewide job training and support services announced by Governor Patrick in April.  These figures are not dissimilar from what we have previously reported and reflect the announcements made by the Secretary over the last few weeks as they have visited various regions around of the state.

ARRA funding will go to the different workforce investment boards and will assist all of the 37 One-Stop Career Centers in Massachusetts. for the one-stop career centers across the state. The board and the centers serve both employers and job-seekers in communities across the state. These resources are a portion of the $67 million recently announced statewide, and will assist all of the 37 One-Stop Career Centers throughout Massachusetts.

It is understood that, although they provide a variety of services, One Stop Career Centers will prioritize job training for dislocated workers and help asses the needs, skills and options of the unemployed. This funding will also be used for literacy training, assistance with GED completion, and help with improving English proficiency.

As referenced in earlier newsletters, ARRA funding provides $21.2 million to serve dislocated workers and more than $10 million to help low-income adults find work. Dislocated worker funds support statewide programming for unemployed workers as well as programming in the Commonwealth’s 16 workforce regions.

Similarly, as we reported in previous newsletters the Governor plans to combine $6.67 million from the state’s YouthWorks summer jobs program with $3.1 million in public safety funds and $21.1 million for youth employment and educational programming provided under the federal recovery bill for a total of $30 million in funding for summer employment and additional services. He estimates that this money will support an estimated 10,000 low-income young people between the ages of 14-24.

Below are the regional allocations for the state’s 16 Workforce Investment Boards. To view the regional press releases, click on an individual board.

Workforce Investment Board ARRA Allocation
Berkshire County Regional Employment Board $1,021,851
Boston Private Industry Council $4,912,876
Bristol Regional Employment Board $4,618,204
Brockton Workforce Investment Board $2,153,268
Cape and Islands Workforce Investment Board $1,936,497
Central MA Workforce Investment Board $4,360,656
Franklin/Hampshire Regional Employment Board $1,790,367
Greater Lowell Workforce Investment Board $2,131,923
Greater New Bedford Workforce Investment Board $3,175,552
Hampden County Regional Employment Board $5,141,066
Merrimack Workforce Investment Board $3,427,935
Metro North Workforce Investment Board $3,618,757
Metro South/West Workforce Investment Board $2,559,938
North Central Workforce Investment Board $2,429,091
North Shore Workforce Investment Board $2,595,445
South Coastal Workforce Investment Board $2,954,628

Competitive Grants

As mentioned in past newsletters, ARRA includes $750 million for competitive grants for worker training and placement in high growth and emerging industry sectors. Within this amount, $500 million is designated for worker training in energy efficiency and renewable energy industries as described in the Green Jobs Act of 2007. Up till now, there has been no specific guidance on what how these funds will be spent.

However, on June 1st, the Employment and Training Administration (ETA) of the Department of Labor announced that it was currently formulating a series of grant competitions for these funds and provided more specifics on how they will be awarded. Although no grant applications have been announced we hope that this fairly detailed information will help guide Massachusetts nonprofits interested in applying for these funds when they are announced by the end of this month.

ETA intends for these funds to be used “to assist individuals impacted by the recession by providing training and placement into employment, including the transition of auto and auto-related workers to jobs in the green energy sector.” These funds are intended to support the training needs of workers and employers in high growth and emerging industries. The grants are also intended to offer an opportunity to demonstrate how partnerships between the public workforce system and other public and private systems, including labor-management partnerships, education institutions, community a faith based organizations, and research institutions can meet the workforce needs of the energy efficiency and renewable energy sectors and other industry sectors.

ETA describes successful organizations and partnerships as those that “ensure that supportive services are integrated with education and training programs so that individuals can have access to a comprehensive array of supportive options that will them in entering career pathways leading to economic self sufficiency.”

Overview of Potential Funding Opportunities

In order to implement this strategic vision, ETA is tentatively planning to issue a series of Solicitations for Grant Applications (SGAs). An overview of the potential solicitations anticipated for funding is provided below. Please be advised that the final funding opportunities may vary from those described.

A. State Labor Market Information Improvement Grants: This will be a competition among State Workforce Agencies (SWAs) or consortia of the SWAs of multiple States to collect, analyze, and disseminate labor market information, as wells as develop a labor exchange infrastructure to direct individuals to careers in the energy efficiency and renewable energy sectors. The activities conducted by successful applicants will be coordinated with and complement work conducted by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. ETA strongly encourages states to form consortia and jointly apply for these grants, and the SGA will reflect a preference for such approaches. Grantees will track workforce trends resulting directly or indirectly from Recovery Act investments, as well as related state, local, or private sector investments that create jobs in energy efficiency and renewable energy sectors after they finish training. This means identifying the existing and emerging needs of employers in these emerging industries, in terms of both skills and job openings, and making available employee placement tools to help match workers with those jobs.

B. Energy Training Partnership Grants: Two separate applicant pools will compete for grants under this solicitation: (1) eligible national labor-management organizations with    local networks; and (2) statewide or local strategic nonprofit partnerships consisting of labor-management organizations, labor, business, Workforces Investment Boards (WIBs), and other organizations. These grantees will deliver training that leads to employment in career in energy efficiency and renewable energy sectors. Grantees will utilize partnerships to design and distribute training approaches that lead to portable industry credentials and employment, including registered apprenticeship. These grants will focus on dislocated and incumbent workers. A portion of the funds under this SGA will be reserved for communities or regions undergoing auto industry related restructuring as discussed below.

C. Pathways Out of Poverty Grants: Two separate applicant pools will compete for grants under this solicitation: (1) eligible national community-based and faith-based organizations with local networks; and (2) local partnerships that include community-based organizations, education and training institutions, businesses, and labor organizations. Successful applicants will provide training and placement services to individuals seeking pathways out of poverty and into employment within energy efficient and renewable energy sectors. Targeted populations include low-income and under-skilled workers, unemployed youth and adults, high school dropouts, or other underserved populations, with priority given to areas of high poverty. Successful training programs for these populations will: (1) include sound recruitment and referral strategies for targeted populations; (2) integrate basic skills and work-readiness training with occupational skills training; (3) combine supportive services with training services to help participants overcome barriers to employment; and (4) provide services at times and locations that are easily accessible.

D. State Sector Training Grants: This will be a competition among SWIBs in partnership with their SWA, local WIBs and One Stop Career Center Systems, or regional consortia of Boards. Grant funds awarded under this SGA will be used to provide training and job placement activities aligned with a workforce sector strategy that will target energy efficiency and renewable energy sectors. The strategy will reflect state energy policies and how they impact the work of the local Workforce Investment system and One Stop Career Centers. Successful applicants will demonstrate: (1) strong partnerships to develop the energy efficiency and renewable energy workforce; (2) relationships with other state agencies receiving recovery Act funding to support strategic planning and implementation efforts; and (3) ability to implement a workforce development approach that targets the needs of a specific industry sector and provides an integrated system of education, training, and supportive services. A portion of the funds under this SGA will be reserves for communities or regions undergoing auto industry related restructuring as discussed below.

E. Green Capacity Building Grants: This will be a competition to build the capacity of current DOL grantees to prepare targeted populations for employment in the energy efficiency and renewable energy sectors. These awards will support organizations as they update existing training and job placement programs for the emerging green economy in order to facilitate the success of other projects under the Green Jobs Initiative. Key activities will include the purchase of equipment, staff professional development, curriculum development, and/or adaptation, partnership development, and where necessary, the hiring of additional staff.

As mentioned above, a portion of the funding under the Energy Training Partnership Grants and the State Sector Training Grants will be reserved to facilitate the transition of auto and auto-related workers to the green/energy efficient workforce. Grants will provide job training, counseling, and placement services to residents from auto communities of incumbent and dislocated workers affected by significant automotive-related restructuring. To qualify for these grants, the geographic area proposed to be served by the project must have within it at least one motor vehicle manufacturer or automotive part supplier and have experienced significant dislocation. Prospective grantees may also propose to serve workers from the area facilities who reside outside the defined area.

ETA anticipates that Solicitations for Grant Applications will be published in June 2009, with application closing dates starting late summer. SGA will be posted on www.grants.gov. Please click here for more details on this potential funding source.

Clean Energy and Environment

State News

Pathways Out of Poverty
On May 28th, Massachusetts announced “Pathways out of Poverty” Green Collar Job Training Grants. These five grants, totaling $1 million were distributed to help low and moderate-income workers obtain training in the growing clean energy sector. The grants were distributed to the following organizations:

  • JYFNetWorks in Boston (serving the Lowell area)
  • Quinsigamond Community College in Worcester
  • Regional Employment Board of Hampden County, Inc. in Springfield
  • Massasoit Community College in Brockton
  • Berkshire Community College in Pittsfield

These funds are intended for use by these organizations to partner with local clean energy companies, education institutions and community organizations so that they may better serve their targeted area. With this funding there may be opportunities for local non-profits and community organizations to partner with the grant recipients to further the goal of job training and placement. Please click here for more information.

Clean Vehicle Funding
The Patrick administration is currently seeking $6.5 million from the federal government for clean vehicle funding. If awarded, this funding would be distributed to both public and private entities for the purpose of purchasing new hybrid vehicles. The Clean Cities fund would pay for the cost disparity between a hybrid vehicle and their conventionally fueled counterparts. These funds could hypothetically be available by late summer. Please click here for more details.

Federal Funding

President Obama announced on May 27th over $467 million from the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act to fund Geothermal and Solar Energy projects. This funding, focused on investing in the clean energy sector is mostly being distributed through competitive grants and government allocations. More information can be seen here and a list of funding opportunities from the DOE can be seen here.

Energy Efficiency Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) Program
Previously mentioned in earlier newsletters, the Energy Efficiency Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) Program is available to State and local governments. However, the application due dates have changed. As of May 11th, the due date for all applicants (States and municipalities) is now June 25th, 2009 not May 25th, 2009, giving more time to state and local governments to apply for their block grants. While only state and local governments may apply for these block grants, there is opportunity for a variety of nonprofits to sub-contract or partner with governmental agencies in accomplishing the specific goals of the grant. Please see below for the breakdown of block grants by state and municipalities.

These formula grants are to be allocated in two ways: at the state level and at the city and counties level. Massachusetts communities with over 35,000 residents are eligible to apply for direct funding from the US Department of Energy (DOE). Those communities will receive a predetermined amount of funding based on the formula grants. Please see the table below. As a state, Massachusetts may also apply for direct funding from the US DOE. In addition, Massachusetts is eligible to receive, as a state, up to $14.7 million in funding. However, at least 60% of this funding (about $8.8 million) must be sub-granted to communities in Massachusetts who are not eligible for direct EECBGs.

These grants could be used any of the following activities:

  • Development of an Energy Efficiency and Conservation Strategy
  • Energy Efficiency and Conservation Programs for Buildings and Facilities
  • Energy Efficiency Retrofits
  • Development and Implementation of Transportation Programs: including development of infrastructure such as bike lanes and pathways and pedestrian walkways; synchronization of traffic signals; implementation of intelligent transportation system (ITS) strategies; idle-reduction technologies.
  • Training of building inspectors to promote building energy efficiency
  • Distributed generation technologies: including district heating and cooling; combined heat and power (CHP) systems; energy storage systems; absorption chillers; desiccant humidifiers; ground source heat pumps; microturbines
  • Energy Efficient Traffic Signals and Street Lighting
  • Renewable Energy Electricity Generating Technologies on Government Buildings: including PV, wind, fuel cells, biomass

Competitive Grants

Habitat Restoration in Coastal Areas
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is announcing the availability of $5 million in funding under ARRA for habitat restoration through the Coastal Program. They anticipate making 20 grants of $25,000.

ARRA funds will prioritize habitat restoration projects that address high priority wetland, upland, or riparian habitats in selected geographic areas. Projects must provide direct benefits to Federal Trust species (i.e., migratory birds, threatened and endangered species, inter-jurisdictional fish, certain marine mammals, and species of international concern. While coastal ecosystems comprise less than 10 percent of the Nation’s land area, they support far greater proportions of our living resources. Specifically, coastal areas (such as those in Massachusetts) support a much higher percentage of the Nation’s threatened and endangered species, fishery resources, migratory songbirds, and migrating and wintering waterfowl. It is a goal of the program to secure at least 50 percent of project costs from non-Service sources, but this goal applies to the national program as a whole, and does not have to be achieved on a project-by-project basis. Those interested in requesting assistance for a potential habitat restoration project must contact their local Coastal Program coordinator for information about funding and technical assistance availability. A listing of all Coastal Program coordinators is available here.

Deadline for applications is Sept 30, 2009.

Education

State Funding

To date, Massachusetts has received $236 million in education stimulus funds-representing a combination of funding for Title I, IDEA, Vocational Rehabilitation Grants and Independent Living Grants. On April 1st, Massachusetts received $82 million in Title I funding and more than $149 million in IDEA funding. This represents 50% of the Title I and IDEA funding Massachusetts is eligible for in total.

On June 1st, Massachusetts’s application for ARRA funds for state education was recently approved by the US Department of Education. The state was approved for $666 million, which they should begin receiving immediately. The state will be able to apply for another $328 million this fall as well. Click here for more details. Over the next two years, Massachusetts will receive an estimated $1.88 billion to support early education, K-12 education and higher education.

Competitive Grants

Teacher Quality Partnership (TQP) Grants Program
ARRA makes $ 143 million is available for a Teacher Quality Partnerships Grants. The Department of Education expects to approve 25- 35 grants with an average award of $1.5 million.  Through these grants, DOE hopes to: Improve student achievement; improve the quality of new and prospective teachers by improving the preparation of prospective teachers and enhancing professional development activities for new teachers; hold teacher preparation programs at institutions of higher education (IHEs) accountable for preparing highly qualified teachers; and recruit highly qualified individuals, including minorities and individuals from other occupations, into the teaching force.

The program seeks to achieve all of these goals by creating partnerships among IHEs, high-need school districts (local educational agencies (LEAs)) their high-need schools, and/or high-need early childhood education (ECE) program and nonprofits. These partnerships would create model teacher preparation programs at the pre-baccalaureate level through the implementation of specific reforms of the IHE’s existing teacher preparation programs, and/or model teaching residency programs for individuals with strong academic and/or professional backgrounds but without teaching experience.  TQP Grants may also support school leadership programs to train superintendents, principals, ECE program directors, and other school leaders in high-need or rural LEAs.

Deadline for Notice of Intent to Apply is June 26, 2009.

Applications for grants under the Teacher Quality Partnership must be submitted electronically using e-Application, accessible through the Department’s e-Grants Web site here. However, in an effort to have a better understanding of the number of entities that intend to apply for funding under this competition, DOE is encouraging each potential applicant to notify the Department by sending a short e-mail message indicating the applicant’s intent to submit an application for funding. The e-mail need not include information regarding the content of the proposed application, only the applicant’s intent to submit it. The Secretary requests that this e-mail notification be sent to Peggi Zelinko at TQPartnership@ed.gov. Applicants that fail to provide this e-mail notification may still apply for funding.

(1) The eligible partnership must include each of the following:

    (i) A high-need LEA.
    (ii) A high-need school or consortium of high-need schools served by the high need LEA, or, as applicable, a high-need ECE program.
    (iii) A partner institution.
    (iv) A school, department, or program of education within such partner institution, which may include an existing teacher professional development program with proven outcomes within a four-year IHE that provides intensive and sustained collaboration between faculty and LEAs
    (v) A school or department of arts and sciences within such partner institution; and

(2) May include any of the following:

    (i) The Governor of the State.
    (ii) The State educational agency.
    (iii) The State board of education.
    (iv) The State agency for higher education.
    (v) A business.
    (vi) A public or private nonprofit educational organization.
    (vii) An educational service agency.
    (viii) A teacher organization.
    (ix) A high-performing LEA, or a consortium of high-performing LEAs, that can serve as a resource to the partnership.
    (x) A charter school (xi) A school or department within the partner institution that focuses on psychology and human development.
    (xii) A school or department within the partner institution with comparable expertise in the disciplines of teaching, learning, and child and adolescent development.
    (xiii) An entity operating a program that provides alternative routes to State certification of teachers.

Click here for full announcement.

Higher Education

Competitive Grants

The Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE)

On June 3rd, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan announced a $7 million special competitive grant to establish innovative and sustainable community college programs that prepare displaced workers for second careers. This first-of-its-kind grant program will be used to develop national models that can be replicated across the country, especially in communities where autoworkers have lost their jobs.  The Secretary called upon institutions of higher learning, private and public nonprofit organizations, and other agencies to propose model programs for training adults to pursue family-sustaining second careers.

Funding could be used to provide services, such as tutoring, academic and career counseling, and help with the registration process. They also may be used to remove financial constraints for adults returning to school, including child care, transportation, and textbooks, however, DOE specifies that programs created with this funding must be sustainable beyond the three-year grant period.

Applications are due on Aug. 4.  DOE anticipates awarding approximately 28 grants by mid-September with projects beginning on or about Oct. 1. The estimated range of the grant awards is $300,000-$750,000 over a three-year period.
Please click here to see the press release and view more information.

NIST Recovery Act Measurement Science and Engineering Research Grants

Program: Providing the Technology Infrastructure to Address National Priorities.
ARRA makes $35 million available to the Commerce Department’s National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for grants and cooperative agreements for measurement science and engineering research in the following six focus areas deemed critical national importance: energy, environment and climate change, information technology/cybersecurity, biosciences/healthcare, manufacturing, and physical infrastructure. The program is “intended to advance the state of knowledge and practice in these areas of critical national importance, in support of NIST’s mission to promote U.S. innovation and industrial competitiveness by advancing measurement science, standards, and technology in ways that enhance economic security and improve our quality of life.”

NIST anticipates funding 20-60 proposals at the level of $500,000 to $1,500,000 per award for a project period of up to 3 years. All applications are due Monday, July 13, 2009.

NIST Research Construction Grants

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has announced the availability of approximately $120 million in competitive grants for the construction of new or expanded scientific research buildings at higher education institutions and nonprofit organizations. NIST expects to fund 8-12 projects. Possible construction projects could include laboratories, test facilities, measurement facilities, research computing facilities, and observatories.

Interested organizations must provide NIST with a Letter of Intent outlining the proposed project by 3 p.m. EDT, Thursday, June 25, 2009. Organizations that submit timely Letters of Intent may then submit full proposals, which must be received by 3 p.m. EDT, Monday, Aug. 10, 2009. Review, selection and grant award processing is expected to be completed by the end of February 2010.

Measurement Science and Engineering Fellowship Program.
The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is establishing a $20 million financial assistance program for awardees to develop and implement with NIST a measurement science and engineering fellowship program as part of NIST’s activities implementing ARRA. The fellowship program is intended to “promote training and practical experience in science and engineering, and to advance NIST’s mission to promote U.S. innovation and industrial competitiveness by advancing measurement science, standards, and technology in ways that enhance economic security and improve our quality of life.” NIST anticipates awarding 1-5 awards for a period of performance of up to 3years.  Senior Research Fellowships will be offered to qualified scientists and engineers working at U.S. private firms, U.S. non-profit organizations, U.S. universities and colleges, hospitals and other organizations in fields of science and engineering that contribute to NIST’s measurement science programs. All applications, paper and electronic, must be received by Monday, July 27, 2009.

Regional Sequestration Technology Training
National Energy Technology Laboratory has announced $6.97 million available under ARRA to fund Regional Sequestration Technology Training. Grant applications are sought from companies, trade groups, and other organizations that can develop regional sequestration technology training to facilitate transfer of knowledge and technologies required for site development, operations, and monitoring of commercial carbon capture and storage (CCS) projects. This training will focus on the applied engineering and science of CCS for site developers, geologists, engineers, and technicians.

It is believed that carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies offer great potential for reducing CO2 emissions and mitigating global climate change. It is expected that deploying these technologies will require a significantly expanded workforce trained in the various specialties that are currently under-represented in the United States. Education and training activities undertaken will develop a future generation of geologists and other scientists, and engineers that will provide the human capital and skills required for implementing and deploying CCS technologies. This regional CO2 sequestration technology training will advance the United States in its position as the leader in technology for addressing climate change and for developing near-zero emission technologies to significantly reduce CO2 emissions from power plants. It is expected that award floors will be $500,000 and award ceilings will be $995,000. Deadline is July 22nd.

Wind Energy Consortia between Institutions of Higher Learning and Industry
ARRA makes $24,000,000 available for two award to fund consortia between institutions of higher learning and industry that will perform focused research on critical wind energy challenges. The consortia must include at least one four-year institution of higher learning that has at least one engineering program that is accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). The funding will be focused on two complementary areas, but not separate topics: Topic Area 1: Partnerships for Wind Research and Turbine Reliability: Universities in regions of the country in a Power Class 3 at 50 meters or greater wind region with consistent wind resources throughout the year are encouraged to team with industry partners to establish facilities/equipment and a research agenda necessary to study major challenges facing today’s wind industry. Proposals must address one or more challenges described in the report “20 Percent Wind Energy by 2030” and shall include descriptions of how the wind hardware and software will be acquired. DOE highly encourages research in turbine reliability as a topic in any consortia proposal. Topic Area 2: Wind Energy Research Development: University R D to advance material design, performance measurements, analytical models, and leveraging partnerships with industry to improve power systems operations, maintenance or repair operations, wind turbine and/or component manufacturing, and interdisciplinary system integration. Fellowships, internships, etc. may be used to support the research agenda. Universities are encouraged to partner with the wind industry in defining their R D agenda, developing their curriculum, and intern partnerships. Deadline is Jul 29, 2009    Click here to view the Opportunity.

Housing and Community Development

Guidance on State Allocation of CDBG-R
As was mentioned in earlier volumes of the newsletter, as part of ARRA, HUD has extended funding for Community Development Block Grants, the so-called CDBG-R grants. The majority of the grantees identified by HUD, are individual municipalities meeting certain population and need requirements and are designated at entitlement communities. In Massachusetts there are 36 such entitlement communities. However, HUD also provides$ 9.1 million infunding to the Commonwealth (DHCD) to disperse, as they see fit, to communities that do not receive direct funding. In an effort to ensure a fair and equitable distribution, DHCD has an established competitive grant process that uses to award these funds.  Typically, DHCD accepts applications electronically through its website, but since the ARRA provides for additional funds that were not incorporated in the normal application process, information has not yet been made available on the application dates for these CDBG-R funds.

However, because we expect DHCD to award the new ARRA funding in a similar way,we thought it prudent to review the funding criteria they will likely use.

CDBG funds under DHCD control are divided into four programs: The Community Development Fund (CDF) I, CDF II, Mini-Entitlement Grants, the Economic Development Fund. Once applications are received by eligible (non-entitlement) communities, each is assigned a Community Wide Needs score from 0 to 35. Based upon this score and a statistical formula, municipalities will be given funds for CDF I, which is for high needs, or CDF II, which are for moderate needs communities. The Mini-Entitlement Grants are designed for communities that fit a more specific criterion: those that attain a certain Community Wide Needs Score (28), have a poverty rate above that of the statewide area, and have a population over 12,000.

The Economic Development Fund offers financing solutions for a myriad of economic and community development projects designed to meet the needs of businesses which retain or create low to moderate income jobs, support revitalization efforts and enhance the quality of life in the community. Projects which receive funding include assistance to non-profits and for-profits, loans, or grants.

In the past, the vast majority of CDBG money from the state is given to CDF I recipients, with the remaining three funds receiving only modest awards.

Children and Families

Competitive Grants

Community Services Block Grant Training and Technical Assistance Program- National Training for Financial Management and Administrative Governance

The Office of Community Services (OCS) within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) has announced that will be accepting application to fund one new grant for $250,000 to create an enhanced nationwide training and technical assistance strategy for community-level financial management and administrative governance among eligible entities in the Community Services Block Grant (CSBG) program.

This one year grant will support a national technical assistance strategy to help CSBG eligible entities address needs in three major focus areas: 1) Organizational Stabilization and Support for CSBG entities experiencing significant fiscal or organizational challenges; 2) Capacity Developmentto ensure ongoing high quality program management among eligible entities adapting to changing community needs; and 3) Promotion of Exemplary Practices by identifying and disseminating service approaches and models that have been successful in addressing specific community needs related to the reduction of poverty, the revitalization of low-income communities, and the empowerment of low-income families and individuals in rural and urban areas to become fully self-sufficient.

CSBG provides States, Community Action Agencies or other organizations designated by the States, funds to alleviate the causes and conditions of poverty in communities.  The funds provide a range of services and activities to assist the needs of low-income individuals including the homeless, migrants and the elderly. Grant amounts are determined by a formula based on each State’s population. Grantees receiving funds under the CSBG program are required to provide services and activities addressing employment, education, better use of available income, housing, nutrition, emergency services and/or health. Already, some Community Action Agencies in Massachusetts have partnered with other community based nonprofits to deliver ARRA funded CSBG services.

Eligible applicants for this grant are CSBG eligible entities, consisting of statewide or local organizations or associations, and non-profit organizations with demonstrated expertise in providing training to individuals and organizations on methods of effectively addressing the needs of low-income families and communities, and knowledge of and experience with the Community Services Network.  Due Date 06/26/2009. For more information see here.

Helpful websites:

Full list of federal grants available through the Recovery Act

Medicaid and Healthcare

Nutrition

Housing, Infrastructure, Economic Development

Unemployment Services:

Environment and Energy:

Save the dates:

  • November 13 – MNN / Associated Grant Makers Annual Conference – “Grantmakers and Grantees for the Common Good” | Sheraton Framingham

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Federal Stimulus Act-Newsletter4

Stimulus and Nonprofits, Vol. 4 – MNN’s ARRA Newsletter – May 27, 2009

Dear Nonprofit Leader,

I hope that you made good use of MNN’s  ARRA Newsletter, Volumes 1, 2 and 3. Today we present Volume 4 of our research on the opportunities for nonprofits to participate in the economic recovery of our country. Please let us know if is useful and how it can be made more so and please share it.

Again, thank you to The Boston Foundation for generously providing financial support for this needed  project.

Sincerely,

Dave Magnani,
Executive Director, 617-330-1188

P.S. Don’t forget to register for our Nonprofit Awareness Day and Excellence Award Ceremony on June 8. Speakers include Governor Deval Patrick, House Speaker Robert DeLeo, Senator Pro Tem Stanley Rosenberg, and Attorney General Martha Coakley.

To view Stimulus and Nonprofits, Volume 1, 2 and 3 or for more information on the Massachusetts Nonprofit Network, please visit our website.

If this edition has been forwarded to you and you would like to receive future volumes please email us your name and organization.

Not a member? Please consider joining to sustain this and other programs.

Where we are right now.

So far, Massachusetts has received $2.9 billion of the $8.7 billion it is expected to receive from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). (See the chart below for a list of funding notification by category allocated to date to Massachusetts). Although this figure has not changed since in the last two weeks, we do expect that Massachusetts will likely see additional funding allocated soon to reflect receipt of Massachusetts’ application for additional education funding. This above figure is exclusive of federal grant money that has been awarded to groups directly via a competitive process.

However, because of deadlines imposed by the Federal Government to ensure that money is allocated quickly and completely in order to spur short-term economic recovery, funds are quickly being made available through local and state agencies.

As has been noted in previous newsletters, most funding is coming to Massachusetts via block grants that go directly to state and local governments or directly to contracting agencies with existing funding and contractual relationships with the federal government.  Because of this, it is imperative that nonprofit organizations partner with state and local governments to make the most of ARRA funding. Collaboration is the key to securing funding as well as meeting the very explicit requirements set out by most ARRA funding opportunities.

MNN’s ARRA Newsletter Volume 4 includes newly released information on deadlines and specific requirements of many of the federal grant opportunities previously referenced in past newsletters. However, because we seek to provide new and relevant information, categories without new announcements or information have not been included. We suggest that you refer back to previous newsletters in order to have a comprehensive understanding of all the funding available in your category of interest.

If there is information that is not contained in this or previous newsletters which you would like us to know and/or to transmit to others, please email us at info@massnonprofitnet.org.

Program – Funds Allocated to Date

  • Adoption Assistance – $1,508,966.00
  • ARRA – Aging Congregate Nutrition Services for States – $1,403,578.00
  • ARRA – Aging Home-Delivered Nutrition Services for States – $690,992.00
  • CDBG Entitlement Grants – $20,015,653.00
  • CDBG State’s Program and Non-Entitlement Grants in Hawaii – $9,103,174.00
  • Child Nutrition Discretionary Grants Limited Availability – $1,404,025.00
  • CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT – $1,868,993.00
  • Clean Water SRF – $133,057,300.00
  • Drinking Water SRF – $52,216,000.00
  • Educational Technology State Grants – $10,559,936.00
  • Employment Service / Wagner-Peyser Funded Activities – $8,063,456.00
  • Federal Work Study – $9,257,238.00
  • Foster Care-Title IV-E – $1,419,936.00
  • Health Center Integrated Services Development Initiative – $9,918,594.00
  • Healthy Homes Demonstration Grants – $1,749,940.00
  • Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing Program – $44,558,792.00
  • IDEA Part B Grants to States – $280,551,559.00
  • IDEA Part B Preschool Grants – $10,263,466.00
  • IDEA Part C Grants for Infants and Families – $7,361,826.00
  • Impact Aid Construction – $0.00
  • Independent Living State Grants – $286,391.00
  • Lead-based Paint Hazard Control in Privately-Owned Housing – $8,624,565.00
  • LUST Trust Fund Program – $3,118,000.00
  • MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM – $594,257,179.00
  • Native American Housing Block Grants (Formula) – $430,371.00
  • Office of Justice Programs (OJP) Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) Formula Program – $25,044,649.00
  • Office of Justice Programs (OJP) Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) Formula Program – $15,749,229.00
  • Office of Justice Programs (OJP) Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force Program – $774,492.00
  • Office of Justice Programs (OJP) OVC FY09 VOCA Victim Compensation Formula Grant Program (Assistance) – $930,000.00
  • Office of Justice Programs (OJP) OVC FY09 VOCA Victim Compensation Formula Grant Program (Compensation) – $271,483.00
  • Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) Recovery Act STOP Violence Against Women Formula Grant Program – $1,057,447.00
  • Public Housing Capital fund Stimulus (Formula) – $81,886,976.00
  • Section 8 Housing Assistance Payments Program Special Allocations – $118,982,618.00
  • Senior Community Service Employment Program – $516,999.00
  • Services for Older Individuals who are Blind – $778,450.00
  • State Administrative Matching Grants for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance – $3,326,983.00
  • State Clean Diesel Grant Program – $1,730,000.00
  • State Energy Program (A) – $54,911,000.00
  • State Fiscal Stabilization Fund – $994,258,205.00
  • Tax Credit Assistance Program – $59,605,630.00
  • The Emergency Food Assistance Program (Administrative Costs) – $428,940.00
  • The Emergency Food Assistance Program (Food Commodities) – $1,711,471.00
  • Title I Grants to Local Educational Agencies – $163,391,186.00
  • Vocational Rehabilitation State Grants – $7,068,629.00
  • Water Quality Planning (604b) – $1,343,900.00
  • Weatherization Assistance for Low-Income Persons (A) – $122,077,457.00
  • WIA Adult Program – $10,073,668.00
  • WIA Dislocated Workers – $21,223,446.00
  • WIA Youth Activities – $24,838,038.00
  • Total $ Allocated – $2,923,670,826.00

Reminder of Upcoming ARRA Deadlines

Please find below the upcoming deadlines for funding opportunities:

  • June 2, 2009 – Deadline for Capital Improvement Program (CIP) for   Community Health Centers
  • June 8th, 2009 – Deadline for Neighborhood Stabilization Fund – Technical Assistance Grants
  • June 15th, 2009 – Deadline for Enabling National Networking of Scientists and Resource Discovery Grants
  • June 15th, 2009 – HUD will start accepting applications for funding requests to green retrofit multi-family housing that is already HUD-assisted
  • June 25, 2009 – Deadline for Energy Efficiency and Conservation competitive grant program
  • June 30th, 2009 – Deadline for NCMHD Community Participation in Health Disparities Intervention Research Planning
  • July 1st, 2009 – Deadline for NCMHD Exploratory Centers of Excellence Grants
  • July 7th, 2009 – Deadline for the Strengthening Communities Fund applications
  • July 17th, 2009 – Applications due for Federal Neighborhood Stabilization Program 2 (NSP2)
  • Sept. 1, 2009 – Deadline for competitive grant applications to buy and rehabilitate foreclosed properties and other projects to stabilize neighborhoods and create affordable housing
  • Sept. 17th, 2009 – Deadline for Core Facility Renovation, Repair and Improvements Grants
  • Sept. 24th, 2009 – Deadline for Academic Research Enhancement Awards
  • June 30th, 2010 – Deadline for EDA Economic Recovery Program applications
  • June 31st, 2010 – Applications will be accepted on a rolling basis up until this date for Boston’s Neighborhood Stabilization Program funds
    Deadline for Capital Improvement Program (CIP) for   Community Health Centers
  • June 25, 2009 – Deadline for Energy Efficiency and Conservation competitive grant program.
  • June 15th, 2009 – HUD will start accepting applications for funding requests to green retrofit multi-family housing that is already HUD-assisted
  • June 25, 2009 – Deadline for Energy Efficiency and Conservation competitive grant program.
  • June 30th, 2009 – Deadline for NCMHD Community Participation in Health Disparities Intervention Research Planning
  • July 7th, 2009 – Deadline for the Strengthening Communities Fund applications.
  • Sept. 1, 2009 – Applications due for round 2 of the Federal Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP).
  • Sept. 1, 2009 – Deadline for competitive grant applications to buy and rehabilitate foreclosed properties and other projects to stabilize neighborhoods and create affordable housing.
  • June 30, 2010 – Deadline for EDA Economic Recovery Program applications.

Strengthening Nonprofits

Competitive Grants

The Strengthening Communities Fund
On May 11th, ACF announced the creation of the Strengthening Communities Fund (SCF) Nonprofit Capacity Building program. Through SCF, ACF will make 34 awards of $1 million to fund experienced lead organizations to provide nonprofit organizations capacity building training, technical assistance, and competitive financial assistance to participating nonprofit organizations. Lead organizations awarded funds under this announcement will serve their selected local nonprofit organizations in order to increase those project partners’ sustainability and improve their effectiveness.  It is intended that organizations receiving assistance from lead organizations will be better equipped as a result of this program to help low-income individuals secure and retain employment, earn higher wages, obtain better-quality jobs, and gain greater access to State and Federal benefits and tax credits.

In making the announcement, HHS noted that “the Federal Government recognizes the important work carried out by nonprofit organizations to address the needs of those suffering economic hardships” and that ” nonprofit organizations need capacity building assistance now to continue to serve those in need in their communities.”

Lead organizations will collaborate with their selected grassroots organizations in distressed communities offering capacity building activities in five critical areas: 1) organizational development, 2) program development, 3) collaboration and community engagement, 4) leadership development, and 5) evaluation of effectiveness.

SCF Nonprofit Capacity Building program funding can be used to address a broad array of economic recovery issues present in communities, including helping low-income individuals secure and retain employment, earn higher wages, obtain better-quality jobs, and gain greater access to state and Federal benefits and tax credits.

Specific examples include: use the funds to purchase computers or set up a computer lab to provide free, online information on State and Federal benefits for low- and moderate-income individuals; a local workforce assessment or other research designed to connect workers to employers; the development of a resource directory to help increase access to the benefits for which individuals and families are eligible.

Additional capacity building activities include: use of  funds to help participating organizations expand and strengthen programs and services to help low-income individuals secure and retain employment, earn higher wages, and obtain better-quality jobs, such as by providing job readiness and retention training; education/training; and other support services related to securing and retaining employment (e.g. emergency cash or food assistance, counseling, transportation, child care, and post-placement support).

Under this announcement, bonus points will be awarded to applicant organizations demonstrating that the applicant is an AmeriCorps*VISTA sponsor; i.e. the applicant will incorporate at least one AmeriCorps*VISTA member into the program design.  ACF also encourages applications from organizations that propose to work with and have experience working with grassroots organizations that historically have not been supported by Federal funds. Lead organizations must be established organizations with well-developed connections and working relationships with the nonprofit community in the well-defined geographic area they propose to serve.

Grantees must provide at least 20 percent of the total approved cost of the project. The non-Federal share may be met by cash or in-kind contributions, although applicants are encouraged to meet their match requirements through cash contributions. For more information please click hereThe deadline for these grants is July 7th, 2009.

Strengthening Communities Fund – State, Local, and Tribal Government
Capacity Building Program

Under this initiative, the Government will award funds to State, city, county, and community organizations to build the capacity of nonprofit faith-based and community organizations and increase nonprofit organizations’ involvement in the economic recovery.  ACF anticipates making 48 awards of $250,000 for a total of $12 million. Grantees will use program funds to provide free capacity building services to nonprofit  organizations, such as a beneficiary benefits clearinghouse, outreach and education, and training and technical assistance to improve awareness of and access to ARRA efforts/benefits and to improve organizational capacity to be active participants in ARRA efforts/benefits.

The purpose of this grant program is to build the capacity of government offices (and their designees) to assist nonprofit organizations in addressing the broad economic recovery issues present in their communities, including helping low-income individuals secure and retain employment, earn higher wages, obtain better-quality jobs, and gain greater access to state and federal benefits and tax credits.  SCF Capacity Building program grantees will use the funds in the following areas:

  • Conducting outreach and education aimed at increasing the involvement of nonprofit organizations in the economic recovery.
  • Providing training and technical assistance aimed at building the capacity of nonprofit organizations to address the broad economic recovery issues present in their communities.
  • Building the capacity of their State, local or Native American/Tribal government office or designee to better involve nonprofit organizations in the economic recovery.
  • Helping organizations develop the capacity to offer additional services based on new needs that have arisen from the economic downturn and new relevant ARRA efforts/programs for which the organizations might be eligible (e.g. offering weatherization activities or green jobs training).
  • Helping organizations form new partnerships to apply for ARRA funding/programs.
  • Helping organizations form/strengthen partnerships to better facilitate referrals for services/benefits.

Capacity building activities must produce measurable results for the authorized entities. Grantees will build their own capacity in one or more of the five critical areas of capacity building:  1) organizational development, 2) program development, 3) collaboration and community engagement, 4) leadership development, and 5) evaluation of effectiveness.

Under this announcement, the project and budget period is 24 months to allow grantees to maximize the grant award in order to provide assistance to nonprofit organizations that is both timely and efficient. Grantees must provide at least 20 percent of the total approved cost of the project. The non-Federal share may be met by cash or in-kind contributions, although applicants are encouraged to meet their match requirements through cash contributions.  Deadline is July 7, 2009. For more information see: here.

Health and Human Services

Competitive Grants

Community Participation in Health Disparities Intervention Research
Planning Grants

The NIH National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NCMHD) has designated up to $7 million for Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) planning grants to support community participation in health disparities intervention research- research that is jointly conducted by communities and researchers. NCMHD is interested in supporting intervention research studies using “CBPR principles” to reduce and eventually eliminate health disparities in any disease or condition of major concern to the community (e.g. cancer, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, HIV/AIDS, infant mortality,) with emphasis on racial and ethnic minorities. The total amount of funding that NCMHD expects to award through this announcement is approximately $7 million. NIH anticipates awarding up to five grants for up to $375,000 in direct costs per year for a two-year planning grant proposal. The first six months of the first year of the grant would be devoted to partnership development, community needs assessment, identifying the disease/condition for intervention research, and planning the intervention methodology with substantial input from the community. During the remaining 18 months of the grant award, a pilot intervention research study will be conducted with community participation.

Those eligible for this grant include nonprofits with or without 501(c)(3) status with the IRS as well as faith-based or Community-based organizations and Hispanic-serving Institutions whose purposes are consistent with those of ARRA.  Please clickhere for more information. The deadline for this grant is June 30th, 2009.

This grant is ideally suited for collaboration between Massachusetts health care researchers and community based organizations. NIH defines CBPR as a process of scientific inquiry where community members, persons affected by the health condition, disability or issue under study, or other key stakeholders involved in the community’s health have the opportunity to be full participants in each phase of the work (from conception – design – conduct – analysis – interpretation – conclusions – communication of results). CBPR is also characterized by substantial community input in the development of the grant application.

For the purpose of this NIH grant, “community” refers to populations that may be defined by: geography, race, ethnicity, gender, illness, or other health condition, or to groups that have a common interest or cause, such as health or service agencies and organizations, health care or public health practitioners or providers, policy makers, or lay public groups with public health concerns. “Community-based organizations” refer to organizations that may be involved in the research process as members or representatives of the community. While not an exhaustive list, organizations as varied as colleges, state or local governments, independent living centers, other educational institutions such as junior colleges, advocacy organizations, health delivery organizations (e.g., hospitals), health professional associations, non-governmental organizations, and federally qualified health centers are possible community partners.

National Center for Minority Health Disparities (NCMHD) Exploratory
Centers of Excellence Grants

NIH’s National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NCMHD) invites grant applications from eligible institutions/organizations that propose to establish an Exploratory NCMHD Center of Excellence (COE). NCMHD COE awards provide funding for hiring staff, researchers, community members, and trainees with the goal of augmenting and expanding the capacity and infrastructure of the institution and community to engage in research improving the health of nation and for preparing the next generation of researchers. Activities should be proposed that will benefit from significant 2-year funds without the expectation of continued NIH funding beyond two years. Like many other funding opportunities under ARRA, activities supported by NCMHD COE grants should have high short-term impact, and a high likelihood of enabling growth and investment in biomedical research and development, public health, and health care delivery.

Applications are specifically sought from institutions seeking support to 1) establish novel partnerships for community engagement/outreach efforts to eliminate health disparities, 2) establish new or enhance current research training infrastructure and capacity, including pipeline training programs, to prepare future biomedical, biobehavioral, and clinical researchers from minority, rural or low social and low economic status populations, and 3) to hire newly-recruited faculty to develop a research project within the context of the NCMHD Centers of Excellence program.

To be eligible for the COE in this FOA, applicant institutions are expected to have existing federal research support and/or research infrastructure as reflected in a level of NIH institutional funding of less than $80 million for the year 2008.  The Deadline is July 1, 2009. For more information see here.

Core Facility Renovation, Repair, and Improvement Grants
Under ARRA, $300,000,000 is allocated to the National Center for Research Resources, and NIH for the renovation, repair, or improvement of core facilities. Core facilities are defined as a “centralized shared resource that provides access to instruments or technologies or services, as well as expert consultation to investigators supported by the core.” The major objective of this grant is to upgrade core facilities to support the conduct of biomedical and/or behavioral research. Support can be requested to alter and renovate the core facility as well as to improve the general equipment in the core facility or to purchase general equipment for specialized groups of researchers. Specialized equipment over $100,000 in cost cannot be requested as part of this grant.  Awards will be expended expeditiously and that applicants are encouraged to consider the use of green technologies and design approaches as well as the creation or maintaining of jobs. Deadline is Sep 17, 2009 For more information see the full announcement here

Academic Research Enhancement Awards
The Academic Research Enhancement Award (AREA) program is funded through NIH and designed to stimulate research in educational institutions that have not been major recipients of NIH support. These AREA grants create opportunities for scientists and institutions otherwise unlikely to participate extensively in NIH programs, to contribute to the Nation’s biomedical and behavioral research effort. AREA grants are intended to support small-scale health-related research projects proposed by faculty members of eligible, domestic institutions. It is estimated that up to 50 awards will be made in FY 2010  for up to a total of $300,000 direct costs plus applicable Facilities and Administrative (F&A)/ indirect costs. The total project period for an application submitted in response to this funding opportunity may be up to three (3) years.  Deadline is Sep 24, 2009   For more information here.

Enabling National Networking of Scientists & Resource Discovery Grant
ARRA appropriates $7.5 million for two awards to public and state controlled institutions of higher education to develop, enhance, or extend infrastructure for connecting people and resources to facilitate national discovery and encourage interdisciplinary collaboration and scientific exchange. NIH seeks implementation and evaluation of a national prototype in research networking and implementation at the end of the two-year project period. NIH requires that a diversity of institutions be included to ensure broad applicability and national impact which could include institutions of varying sizes and levels of existing infrastructure; urban, suburban, and rural settings; and racial, ethnic, and geographic diversity. Deadline is Jun 15, 2009. More information available here.

Labor and Workforce Development

Municipalities/Localities
On May 14th, Massachusetts announced more than $2.59 million in federal recovery funds for the The North Shore via the North Shore Workforce investment board for the one-stop career centers in Gloucester, Lynn and Salem. Click here to view the May 14th press release.

On May 11th, Massachusetts announced more than $1.79 million in federal recovery funds for the Franklin and Hampshire communities via the Franklin Hampshire Regional Employment Board for the one-stop career centers in Greenfield and Northampton. Click here to view the May 11th press release.

Competitive Grants

Department of Labor Recover Act Competitive Grant Opportunities
As outlined in earlier newsletters, ARRA provides $750 million for a program of competitive grants for worker training and placement in high growth and emerging industry sectors. In order to maximize the impact of these competitive grants and leverage the other investments in the Recovery Act, the Department of Labor (DOL) is collaborating with other Federal agencies and developing a multi-pronged investment approach with these funds. DOL plans to issue Solicitations for Grant Awards (SGA) no later than June 30, 2009 which will lay out specific requirements for use of the funds, certification, data reporting, performance measures, and other necessary information.

However, in preparation for the awards notice, DOL has recently specified that $500 million will be targeted for research, labor exchange, and job training projects that prepare workers for careers in energy efficiency and renewable energy; energy efficient building, construction, and retrofitting; renewable electric power; energy efficient and advanced drive train vehicles; biofuels; deconstruction and materials use; energy efficiency assessment for residential, commercial, or industrial sector, and manufacturing of sustainable products using sustainable processes.

The remaining $250 million will be for projects in other high growth and emerging industry sectors with a priority for projects that prepare workers for careers in the health care sector and projects that are tied to industry sectors where jobs are being created as a result of Recovery Act investments such as infrastructure investments.  Specific funding opportunities related to this notice will be forthcoming and will be posted here and DOL’s website.

The EDA American Recovery Program
The Economic Development Administration (EDA) has appropriated $150,000,000 for the EDA American Recovery Program under the auspices of the Public Works and Economic Development Act (PWEDA) and is soliciting applications. Eligible applicants include a(n): (i) District Organization; (ii) Indian Tribe or a consortium of Indian Tribes; (iii) State, a city or other political subdivision of a State, including a special purpose unit of a State or local government engaged in economic or infrastructure development activities, or a consortium of political subdivisions; (iv) institution of higher education or a consortium of institutions of higher education; or (v) public or private non-profit organization or association acting in cooperation with officials of a political subdivision of a State.

EDA will give priority consideration to those applications that will significantly benefit regions “that have experienced sudden and severe economic dislocation and job loss due to corporate restructuring,” as stipulated under the Recovery Act. EDA provides financial assistance to distressed communities in both urban and rural regions. Such distress may exist in a variety of forms, including high levels of unemployment, low income levels, large concentrations of low-income families, significant declines in per capita income, large numbers (or high rates) of business failures, sudden major layoffs or plant closures, trade impacts, military base closures, natural or other major disasters, depletion of natural resources, reduced tax bases, or substantial loss of population because of the lack of employment opportunities.

The closing deadline for applications is June 30, 2010. For more information about the grant, eligibility, and funding, please visit here.

Clean Energy and Environment

State Agencies
Governor Patrick announced on May 18th that federally-backed zero interest bonds for renewable energy projects would be available for municipalities, state agencies and other public entities’ work on solar, wind and other renewable power projects. While not specifically available for nonprofits, there may be additional opportunities for partnerships as money will be put into this sector of the economy. Please click here for the press release.

Direct Federal Funding

Green Retrofit Program for Multifamily Housing
$250 million in ARRA funds will be focused on promoting energy efficiency and green retrofitting in multi-family housing. The Green Retrofit Program for Multifamily Housing will put $15,000 per unit in the hopes of reducing energy costs and water waste with improvements. Eligible applicants are those who already receive HUD assistance (Section 8 project-based rental assistance or the Departments Section 202 (elderly) and Section 811 (disabled) programs). Applications for these grants and loans will be accepted beginning June 15th, 2009. This funding has a two-fold purpose: both to encourage green building and lower energy use as well as create new jobs for those in the green economy. Click here for more details.

Municipalities

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG)
As mentioned in our first newsletter, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has issued guidance for formula-based federal stimulus funding available to cities and towns under the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) Program. EECBG appropriates approximately $1.9 billion for formula grants to eligible cities and counties and $767 million for formula grants to states. Each state is required to pass not less than 60 percent of its allocation through to cities and counties within the state that are ineligible for direct formula grants from the DOE.

Grants can be used for energy efficiency and conservation programs and projects community wide, and renewable energy installations in or on government buildings. Activities eligible for use of funds include:

  • Development of an energy efficiency and conservation strategy
  • Building energy audits and retrofits, including weatherization
  • Financial incentive programs for energy
  • Transportation programs to conserve energy
  • Building code development, implementation, and inspections
  • Installation of distributed energy tech.,  including district heating and cooling systems
  • Material conservation programs including source reduction and recycling
  • Reduction/capture of greenhouse gas generated by landfills or waste-related sources
  • Installation of energy efficient traffic signals and street lighting
  • Installation of renewable energy technologies in or on government buildings
  • Other activity that meets the purposes of program and approved by DOE

The forty-two Massachusetts communities with more than 35,000 residents are eligible for direct funding from the US DOE. The MA Dept. of Energy Resources (DOER) will apply for and receive the funds from US DOE to distribute to communities with fewer than 35,000 residents. The amount of funding for these sub grants, and for DOER programming and assistance, is $14,752,100, of which 60% must be provided in sub grants. All funds must be obligated/committed within 18 months of the effective date of the award and expended within 36 months of the effective date of the award.

Below is a list of the predetermined funding amounts for communities larger than 35,000 residents.

State Name Government Level Allocation
MA Massachusetts State Energy Office $14,752,100
MA Amherst, Town of City $162,000
MA Arlington, Town of City $159,700
MA Attleboro City $179,600
MA Barnstable Town City $202,400
MA Beverly City $169,600
MA Billerica, Town of City $180,200
MA Boston City $6,506,200
MA Brockton City $865,000
MA Brookline, Town of City $494,400
MA Cambridge City $1,139,400
MA Chelsea City $164,000
MA Chicopee City $499,100
MA Everett City $149,300
MA Fall River City $861,300
MA Fitchburg City $168,000
MA Framingham, Town of City $657,000
MA Haverhill City $542,700
MA Holyoke City $175,700
MA Lawrence City $651,300
MA Leominster City $175,500
MA Lowell City $954,700
MA Lynn City $788,100
MA Malden City $501,500
MA Marlborough City $178,000
MA Medford City $504,000
MA Methuen City $179,200
MA New Bedford City $869,300
MA Newton City $799,600
MA Peabody City $494,200
MA Pittsfield City $189,100
MA Plymouth, Town of City $514,300
MA Quincy City $881,200
MA Revere City $485,500
MA Salem City $174,300
MA Somerville City $651,100
MA Springfield City $1,498,200
MA Taunton City $519,600
MA Waltham City $630,500
MA Westfield City $170,300
MA Weymouth, Town of City $485,800
MA Woburn City $174,600
MA Worcester City $1,733,000

Education

State Funding

IDEA, Part C ARRA funding
The state is going to receive an additional $7.3 million in IDEA, Part C funding. This funding is for direct early intervention programs for infants and toddlers with disabilities. The program focuses on diagnosing and partnering families with the appropriate private and public programs or the child’s benefit. Organizations that work with disabled children could potentially work with the school districts and the accompanying IDEA program. At this time it is unclear when the state will be receiving this aid, however, all funds must be obligated by September 30th, 2011.here and here for more information.

IDEA, Part B Preschool Grants
The state will also receive $10 million in additional funds for preschool aged children with disabilites. This money will also go to providing direct services to children, especially in areas of school-readiness. Click here for more details.

Competitve Grants

The Teacher Quality Partnership program
This grant seeks to improve the quality of new teachers working in high-need local educational agencies (LEAs) and high-need schools by creating successful and high-quality model Pre-Baccalaureate Teacher Preparation programs and/or Teaching Residency programs for those qualified to begin teaching. DOE expects to fund 50 projects for a total of $100 million. Projects may also include a school leadership component to train superintendents, principals, early childhood educator program directors and other school leaders in high-need or rural LEAs. Initiatives to support development of digital education content, to improve the quality of pre-baccalaureate teacher preparation programs, and/or to enhance the quality of pre-service training for prospective teachers are also supported.

An eligible grant applicant is a partnership that includes, at a minimum: (1) A high-need local educational agency (LEA); (2) A high-need school or a consortium of high-need schools served by the high-need LEA and/or, as applicable, a high-need early childhood education program; (3) A partner institution of higher education; (4) A school, department, or program of education within such partner institution, which may include an existing teacher professional development program with proven outcomes within a four-year institution of higher education that provides intensive and sustained collaboration between faculty and LEAs consistent with the requirements of the law; and (5) A school or department of arts and sciences within such partner institution. The partnership may also include the governor of the state, a business. and other types of educational entities, e.g., state board of education, charter school, or teacher organization.

Housing and Community Development

Municipalities/Localities
Boston now has $4 million in Neighborhood Stabilization Program funds for organizations to buy and rehabilitate foreclosed properties to create new homeownership and rental housing in neighborhoods of Boston which have had direct consequences of foreclosures. These funding is to be used in areas that are considered high-risk where affordable housing would help these vulnerable communities. Applicant packets are now available at the DND, Bid Counter, 26 Court Street, 10th Floor, Boston, MA 02108 or online at www.dnd.gov. Applications will be accepted on a rolling admission basis until June 21, 2010 or until funds have been exhausted.

Competitive Grants

Neighborhood Stabilization Program 2 (NSP2)

As was mentioned in a previous newsletter this is a competitive grant that is open to nonprofits to buy and rehabilitate foreclosed properties and other projects to stabilize neighborhoods and create affordable housing.  Neighborhood Stabilization Program 2 which is funded at $1.93 billion is a follow up to the Neighborhood Stabilization Program 1 (NSP1) grants, which have already been designated. Applications for the NSP2 grants are due July 17th, 2009.

As in NSP1, recipients will use the funds awarded under NSP2  to stabilize neighborhoods whose viability has been and continues to be damaged by the economic effects of properties that have been foreclosed upon and abandoned. Eligible applicants include states, units of general local government, nonprofits, and consortia of nonprofits. Any applicant may apply with a for-profit entity as its partner. There will be two competitions. Under the program round in this notice, applicants will compete for up to $1.93 billion of NSP2 funds to carry out neighborhood stabilization programs. Under the technical assistance round (see below) in a separate notice, applicants will compete for no more than $50 million of NSP2 funds to provide technical assistance, to include capacity building of local communities receiving NSP1 or any entity receiving NSP2 funding to carry out neighborhood stabilization.

Successful proposals will receive $5 million at minimum. Rating factors will include grantee capacity to execute projects, leveraging potential, and concentration of investment to achieve neighborhood stabilization. There are some discrepancies between NSP1 and NSP2 in terms of what constitutes as an eligible proposal. Under NSP2 (1) A land bank is redefined to include operational costs and is expanded to included residential properties, not just foreclosed homes (2) Limits redevelopment of vacant or demolished property only as housing (3) Demolition of public housing is prohibited. Grantees are also expected to expend 50% of their funding within two years and 100% within three, as oppose to the four year timeline set for NSP1 funds.  Please click here for more details.

Neighborhood Stabilization Fund- Technical Assistance Grants
HUD has made $50 million available to be allocated by competition to technical assistance (TA) providers of HUD’s community development programs grantees and subrecipients; $11.5 million is available for local TA activities and the remaining $38.5 million is available for national and regional TA activities. HUD has established a $750,000 award minimum for successful national TA applications.Eligible National TA activities include: the development of written products, on-line materials and training courses as well as the delivery of direct TA. HUD has established a $500,000 award minimum for successful local applications. Eligible Local TA activities are limited to the development of needs assessments and the delivery of direct TA.

Eligible entities include states, local governments and non profits. While a consortium of organizations may apply, one organization must be designated as the lead applicant for the consortium. HUD will select NSP-TA providers on the basis of capacity and experience in: 1) undertaking the eligible TA activities; 2) the ability to manage and expend the requested level of funds within the three-year performance period; and 3) leveraging resources by using existing materials and limiting duplicative efforts.

Deadline date is June 8, 2009. For Full application see: here.

Children and Families

Direct Federal Funding

Recovery Act WIC EBT Expansion
The ARRA will provide a total of $100 million to be used by WIC state agencies to work on their management information systems (MIS) for their programs so that they will comply with new requirements. While this grant is for a state agency, there seems to be opportunity for a non-profit to work with, or sub-contract with the states WIC agency. Contact your local/state WIC agency. Applications close June 26, 2009. Click here for more information.

Head Start Expansion
The Administration for Children and Families (ACF), Office of Head Start (OHS) has announced that it is soliciting applications from existing federally funded Head Start agencies to compete for $102 million in funds to provide services to unserved children and families residing in the defined federally approved service areas or, nearby unserved areas. ACF expects to make 200 grants of no more than $5 million each. Funding will support an increase in the enrollment of additional children as well as create new teaching positions in Head Start programs. This expansion is only to increase the number of pre-school age children served in Head Start. Grantees may propose to serve areas that are currently unserved as long as they can demonstrate they meet the statutory requirement to be a Head Start provider in that community; i.e. an agency that would be understood by the community as a local agency, within a community; an agency that has some presence in that community; or the community is contiguous to its current service area and the community demonstrates its support for the applicant to be a Head Start provider in the community. Applicants proposing to both expand within their current service area and to establish a new program in an unserved area must submit separate applications. Deadline is Jun 23, 2009 See here

Competitive Grants

Early Head Start Grants
The Administration for Children and Families (ACF), Office of Head Start (OHS) is soliciting applications from public or private non-profit organizations, including faith-based organizations or for-profit organizations, that wish to compete for $619 million in funds to provide Early Head Start services to pregnant women, infants and toddlers and their families. Funding will support an increase in the enrollment of additional children as well as create new teaching and other positions within Early Head Start programs. ACF expects to make 600 awards. Financial assistance will be competitively awarded to public and non-profit and for-profit private entities, including Early Head Start and Head Start grantees, to provide child and family development services for low-income families with infants and toddlers ages birth to three years and pregnant women who are not currently being served by a Head Start or Early Head Start program. The purpose of the Early Head Start program is to enhance children’s physical, social, emotional, and intellectual development; to provide support, direct services, and referrals to pregnant women; to support parents’ efforts to fulfill their parental roles; and to help parents move toward self-sufficiency. Successful applicants will be subject to reporting requirements consistent with current Head Start regulations. All interested applicants can access information that will inform the design of quality Early Head Start programs that meet the requirements of the Head Start Program Performance Standards and other regulations and the Head Start Act on the Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center. Deadline is July 09, 2009. See here for the full announcement.

Community Services Block Grant Training and Technical Assistance Program: Capacity-Building for Ongoing CSBG Programs and Strategic
Planning and Coordination

The Administration for Children and Families (ACF), Office of Community Services (OCS) is soliciting applications for grant awards to fund up to 48 statewide capacity-building collaborations. Each collaboration will include the following two major component areas: 1) Capacity-Building for Ongoing CSBG Programs, 2) Strategic Planning and Coordination supported by ARRA.
ACF will provide a separate grant award for each project for a total of 96 grant awards under this announcement. Estimated total program funding for Part 1 (Capacity Building for Ongoing CSBG Programs) is $1,200,000 and estimated total program funding for Part 2 (Strategic Planning and Coordination supported by ARRA) is $3,840,000. Applicants may apply for up to $25,000 per 12-month budget period for Part 1. Applicants also may apply for up to $80,000 per 12-month budget period for Part 2.

For both Part I and Part 2 grantees, funds will be used to provide training and technical assistance on improving program quality (including financial management), management information and reporting systems, measurement of program results, and responsiveness to identified local needs. OCS has determined that key technical assistance needs include statewide efforts designed to 1) ensure coordination of Community Action Program Recovery Act projects, 2) inform communities of available services, 3) document community results; and 4) prepare communities to sustain the impact of Recovery Act funds.

Eligible applicants are eligible entities (as defined in the CSBG Act), or statewide or local organizations or associations, with demonstrated expertise in providing training to individuals and organizations on methods of effectively addressing the needs of low-income families and communities.

Applicants for funding under this announcement must be recognized by the State CSBG lead agency as a technical assistance provider for eligible entities within the State and must include a letter of endorsement from the State CSBG lead agency.

Due date is July 12, 2009.
See here for the full announcement.

Helpful websites:

Full list of federal grants available through the Recovery Act

Medicaid and Healthcare

Nutrition

Housing, Infrastructure, Economic Development

Unemployment Services:

Environment and Energy:

Save the dates:

  • May 29 – Nonprofit Congress-Boston area meeting
  • June 8 – Nonprofit Awareness Day and Nonprofit Excellence Awards Ceremony
  • November 13 – MNN / Associated Grant Makers Annual Conference – “Grantmakers and Grantees for the Common Good” | Sheraton Framingham

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Federal Stimulus Act-Newsletter3

Stimulus and Nonprofits, Vol. 3 – MNN’s ARRA Newsletter – May 11, 2009

Dear Nonprofit Leader,

I hope that you made good use of MNN’s  ARRA Newsletter, Volumes 1 and 2, you may want to reference these at www.massnonprofitnet.org. Each volume will include links to previous volumes for your reference. Today we present Volume 3 of our research on the opportunities for nonprofits to participate in the economic recovery of our county. Please let us know if is useful and how it can be made more so and please share it.

Thank you to The Boston Foundation for generously providing the financial support needed for this project.

Sincerely,

Dave Magnani,
Executive Director
617-330-1188

P.S.  Don’t forget to register for Nonprofit Awareness Day and Excellence Award Ceremony on June 8

To view Stimulus and Nonprofits, Volume 1 and 2 or for more information on the Massachusetts Nonprofit Network, please visit our website.

If this edition has been forwarded to you and you would like to receive future volumes please email us your name and organization.

Where we are right now.

To date, Massachusetts has been allocated approximately $2.93 billion out of the estimated $8.7 billion expected to be received by the federal government under theAmerican Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Additionally, there are more than 8,300 requests for the approximately $2 billion to be spent on shovel-ready projects that include bridge and road work and the renovation of municipal buildings. The state has begun receiving funding for various grants it has applied for and state agencies are making announcements as to how they will be dispersing those funds.  Funding going directly to municipalities via existing formulas has started to come in as well (see the tables included below). As you know, the chief aim of ARRA is to stimulate the economy in the short term (while providing investments for the long term) and as such, there is a rush to have receiving entities spend as much of the funding as soon as possible.

We urge you to continue to position your organization by making contact with your local/municipal government, building relationships with elected officials who can advocate for your organization’s work, and collaborating with other organizations doing similar work as you. Again, keep in mind that the goals of the various funding streams are very specific, so carefully review options to ensure that your organization can meet the need of the funding opportunity. Alternatively, seek out opportunities to provide one or more components of a grant for which another nonprofit is applying. The networking opportunities provided by MNN may provide you with an opportunity to showcase your organization’s core mission, expertise and skills at serving a particular population or region, which might be of interest to other nonprofits applying for funding.

This newsletter seeks to provide new information and as such, categories without new announcements or information have not been included. Please refer back to previous newsletters in order to have a comprehensive understanding of all the funding available in your category of interest.

If there is information that is not contained in this or previous newsletters which you would like us to know and/or to transmit to others, please email us at info@massnonprofitnet.org.

Reminder of Upcoming ARRA Deadlines

Please find below the upcoming deadlines for funding opportunities we alerted you to in our past newsletters.

  • June 2, 2009 – Deadline for Capital Improvement Program (CIP) for Community Health Centers
  • June 25, 2009 – Deadline for Energy Efficiency and Conservation competitive grant program.
  • Sept. 1, 2009 – Applications due for round 2 of the Federal Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP).
  • Sept. 1, 2009 – Deadline for competitive grant applications to buy and rehabilitate foreclosed properties and other projects to stabilize neighborhoods and create affordable housing.

Continued Guidance for Accessing Funding

  • Continue to read over information on grants with an eye towards how you might fill the core function (a list of important websites is attached). Nonprofits should spend time reviewing the principal federal website for ARRA here as well as the Massachusetts ARRA website here. The federal Grants Management System website is extremely useful for finding federal grant information. Specifically, here you can search for grants that have been funded by ARRA. The website provides deadlines and eligibility, as well as detailed descriptions of the programs. For direct contracts or federal business opportunities nonprofits should search here.
  • If you are fairly certain that you will be applying for a federal grant, it is highly recommended that you complete as much of the pre-application work as soon as possible. The steps in this process normally – without the increased demand caused by ARRA – can take up to a couple of weeks. For example, applicants will require a Data Universal Number (DUNS number). Most large organizations, independent libraries, colleges and research universities already have DUNS numbers. Once a DUNS number is obtained, organizations need to use that number to register with the Central Contractor Registration (CCR) as well as set up an Authorized Organization Representative (AOR), a process designed to safeguard your organization from individuals who may attempt to submit grant application packages without permission. The following link can walk you through the entire pre-application process here.
  • Small and midsized nonprofits should consider ways to collaborate with each other and use their local connections and creativity to take advantage of mission-related opportunities. Nonprofits in Massachusetts may wish to consider ways in which they might be able to apply a particular expertise or skill to a region of the state without similar resources. For example, nonprofits that provide job training services should consider areas of the state that have experienced unprecedented unemployment and corresponding demand for job training services and where existing providers are at capacity or do not have breath of services needed.
  • Nonprofits should continue to reach out to local officials. As was outlined in our previous newsletter, a sizable portion of ARRA funding will be administered directly by municipal leaders. Because some of the federal funds flowing to states and local governments formally will require receiving governments to have community partners, it is wise to make sure that these officials understand ways in which you can help them to deliver critical services.

Health and Human Services

Competitive Grants

Capital Improvements Program (CIP) for Community Health Centers
ARRA provides $1.5 billion to support construction, renovation and equipment, including health information technology systems, in health centers and health center controlled networks. ARRA specifies that funds are to be used for “grants to health centers authorized under section 330 of the Public Health Services (PHS) Act” (i.e., only funded Health Center Program grantee health centers). Health center grantees requesting CIP grants must demonstrate how their proposal will lead to improvements in access to health services for underserved populations and create health center and construction-related jobs.  CIP grants are one-time awards and there is no ongoing support of CIP grant activities after the end of the 2-year project/budget period. The deadline for the initial application is June 2, 2009. See Recovery Act Grants Health Center Program for more information.

NIH
As was previously mentioned in our last two newsletters, there is a lot of new research funding that NIH is awarding.  The likely awardees are medical schools and hospitals and other research organizations. To the extent that any of the research will involve the use of data or provision of services (“subjects”) in a community setting, health centers and/or other community based organizations might have some opportunity for funding.

Wellness and Prevention
ARRA provides $700 million to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for evidence-based clinical and community-based prevention and wellness strategies and to implement strategies to control infections in healthcare settings ($50 million nationally).  These funds will be awarded under competitive grants. In response to the Act, CDC has established the Economic Stimulus Response Team (ESRT), a cross-disciplinary group of staff, to assist in preparing the agency’s strategy and response to the stimulus effort. Kathleen Toomey, MD, MPH, has been appointed to lead the effort by CDC. The ERST will recommend which activities will be funded, ensure all Congressional requirements will be met and make certain CDC has the resources and infrastructure necessary to support the endeavor. For more information.

Health IT
The ARRA lays the foundation for national health information technology (HIT) standards, provides certain incentives for the adoption and use of HIT by hospitals and health care providers, and addresses privacy and information security. The administration’s goal is to implement systems of operating electronic health (medical) records (EMR or EHR) by all hospitals, physicians and other providers and for establishing “interoperability” so that info in one hospital system’s EHR is accessible for providers anywhere in the country.  ARRA allocates $17 billion for this purpose by altering Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement methodologies beginning in 2011. Health care providers such as doctors and hospitals would be reimbursed by higher Medicare and Medicaid payments if they put the systems in place by 2011. Doctors can receive up to $60,000 and hospitals up to $11 million. If they don’t switch, they could see their Medicare and Medicaid dollars decline. Massachusetts has been a pioneer in this field with an effort that began in August 2008 to achieve the same outcome.  Specific information is expected to be forthcoming from the Massachusetts e-Health Institute located within the Massachusetts Technology Collaborative which has been spearheading the effort.

Children and Families

Competitive Grants
The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) is offeringInternet Crimes Against Children Research Grants, the purpose of which is to fund research that will expand our understanding of the scope and prevalence of technology and internet-facilitated crimes against children. Funded projects should aim to produce information that will assist state and local law enforcement and prosecutors working internet or technology-facilitated crimes against children cases, as well as policymakers who rely on the evidence base to make decisions.

Public agencies, non-profits, and private organizations are all eligible to apply. As described in our previous newsletter, organizations must first obtain a DUNS number to apply for this grant. If you haven’t already done so, you can register yourself or your organization here. Applications for this grant are due by 12pm on May 14, 2009. Click here to view the full grant announcement.

Labor and Workforce Development

Municipalities/Localities
Recently, the Patrick administration has begun to announce the allocation of workforce training funding in the Commonwealth stemming from federal recovery funds. On April 28th, Massachusetts announced more than $67 million from ARRA will be used to make immediate investments in job training and support services for dislocated workers, low-income youths and adults.The state announced that more than $4.9 million of this funding would be going to the Boston Private Industry Council and three One-Stop Career Centers in the City of Boston. Click here to view the April 28th press release.

On April 30th, Massachusetts announced more than $1.9 million in federal recovery funds for the Cape and Islands via the Cape and Islands Workforce Investment Board for the Career Opportunities centers in Falmouth, Hyannis, and Orleans.  Click here to view the April 30th press release.

On May 6th, Massachusetts announced more than $4.3 million in federal recovery funds for Central Massachusetts via the Central Massachusetts Regional Employment Board for the Workforce Central Career Center’s in Milford, Southbridge, and Worcester.  Click here to view the May 6th press release.

On May 7th, Massachusetts announced $4.6 million in federal recovery funds in theFall River area via the Bristol Workforce Investment Board for the one-stop career centers in Fall River, Taunton, and Attleboro. Click here to view the May 7th new article.

Competitive Grants
The Workforce Investment Act, mentioned in our last newsletter, also includes $750 million for competitive grants for worker training and placement in high growth and emerging industry sectors. Within this amount, $500 million is designated for worker training in energy efficiency and renewable energy industries as described in the Green Jobs Act of 2007. Priority for the balance of funds is given to projects that prepare workers for careers in the health care sector. These funds are available through June 30, 2010, provided that a local Workforce Investment Board (WIB) may award a contract to an institution of higher education or other eligible training provider if the local board determines that it would facilitate the training of multiple individuals in high-demand occupations. For more information on the WIA Competitive Training Grants, click here.

  • Right now, organizations should be talking to partners in the workforce system and demonstrate their training capacity and job placement skills.
  • States must submit their modified plans for funds by June 30, 2009. Those interested in Workforce Development should contact their local WIBs/one-stop career centers and State Dept. of Labor to help shape state plans for money.
  • To learn more about ARRA and Workforce Development, visit the Dept. of Labor’s Employment & Training Administration site here.

The EDA American Recovery Program
The Economic Development Administration (EDA) has appropriated $150,000,000 for the EDA American Recovery Program under the auspices of the Public Works and Economic Development Act (PWEDA) and is soliciting applications. Eligible applicants include a(n): (i) District Organization; (ii) Indian Tribe or a consortium of Indian Tribes; (iii) State, a city or other political subdivision of a State, including a special purpose unit of a State or local government engaged in economic or infrastructure development activities, or a consortium of political subdivisions; (iv) institution of higher education or a consortium of institutions of higher education; or (v) public or private non-profit organization or association acting in cooperation with officials of a political subdivision of a State.

EDA will give priority consideration to those applications that will significantly benefit regions “that have experienced sudden and severe economic dislocation and job loss due to corporate restructuring,” as stipulated under the Recovery Act. EDA provides financial assistance to distressed communities in both urban and rural regions. Such distress may exist in a variety of forms, including high levels of unemployment, low income levels, large concentrations of low-income families, significant declines in per capita income, large numbers (or high rates) of business failures, sudden major layoffs or plant closures, trade impacts, military base closures, natural or other major disasters, depletion of natural resources, reduced tax bases, or substantial loss of population because of the lack of employment opportunities.

The closing deadline for applications is June 30, 2010. For more information about the grant, eligibility, and funding, please visit here.

Clean Energy and Environment

State Agencies
On April 22, 2009, Governor Patrick issued a press release announcing the launch of the Green Communities Program, which will help municipalities across Massachusetts cut energy bills through greater efficiency and locally generated renewable power. The Green Communities Program is a component of Governor Patrick’s Massachusetts Recovery Plan, making information and technical assistance available for communities to help them prepare for and make the most of federal recovery funds targeted for energy investments.

Officials hope that the creation of the Green Communities Program will provide cities and towns with more tools in seeking federal recovery funds for energy efficiency programs. The Green Communities Program is now in the process of assigning four regional coordinators who will provide communities around the state with technical assistance on becoming Green Communities and on making choices about energy investments with federal funds.

To view the full press release, visit here.
For more information about the Green Communities Program, visit here.

Municipalities

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant
As mentioned in our first newsletter, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has issued guidance for formula-based federal stimulus funding available to cities and towns under the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) Program. The purpose of the EECBG Program is to assist eligible entities in creating and implementing strategies to: reduce fossil fuel emissions in a manner that is environmentally sustainable and, to the maximum extent practicable, maximize benefits for local and regional communities; reduce the total energy use of the eligible entities; and improve energy efficiency in the building sector, the transportation sector, and other appropriate sectors.

The forty-two Massachusetts communities with more than 35,000 residents are eligible for direct funding from the US DOE. The MA Dept. of Energy Resources (DOER) will apply for and receive the funds from US DOE to distribute to communities with fewer than 35,000 residents. The amount of funding for these sub grants, and for DOER programming and assistance, is $14,752,100, of which 60% must be provided in sub grants. DOER is in the midst of developing a process to provide direct energy assistance to all communities while also providing an application process for the sub grants. The DOER plan for this process must be submitted to US DOE by May 25th. DOER will notify municipalities when there is more information available. If this would apply to your organization, make sure to speak with your local government about applying.

The funding for each community is based on a formula, and the Federal funds are left up to the state to determine how they are dispersed. Organizations should contact the State Energy Office to request information on Massachusetts’ plan for awarding sub grants under the EECBG program. Please contact the Green Communities Division with further questions: Mark Sylvia, mark.sylvia@state.ma.us; Meg Lusardi, meg.lusardi@state.ma.us; Jack Bevelaqua (forms), jack.bevelaqua@state.ma.us.

To view the DOER Funding Guidance Document of the EECBG Program and to see the predetermined funding amounts for communities larger than 35,000 residents, visithere

Education

Competitive Grants

Teacher Incentive Fund – (TIF)
On April 28, 2009, the Massachusetts Executive Office of Education released an updated fact sheet on state education funding, covering allocated funding to date. $200M  has been made available nationwide for local districts to support performance-based teacher and principal compensation systems in high-need schools. Local Educational Agencies (LEAs), including charter schools that are LEAs in their state, SEAs, or partnerships of (1) an LEA, an SEA, or both, and (2) at least one nonprofit organization may apply. Agencies with differentiated compensation systems already in place may apply for a TIF program grant to expand their programs so that they reach additional high-need school sites (the TIF program understands a high-need school to mean, among other things, a school with more than 30 percent of its enrollment from low income families) or to include teachers or administrators in high-need schools who are not participating in the current system. These compensation systems must consider gains in student achievement as well as ongoing classroom evaluations (among other factors), and must provide educators with incentives when they assume additional responsibilities and leadership roles. According to the Executive Office of Education, funding will be available beginning in fall 2009 based on the quality of the applications submitted through a competitive grant process, and guidelines will be available in the near future.
View the state’s entire updated fact sheet online here.
View the grant announcement, including full details on eligibility and requirements, for the Teacher Incentive Fund here.

Housing and Community Development

Municipalities/Localities
Community Development Block Grant
As was mentioned in our earlier newsletters, over $1 billion of the federal economic stimulus bill was appropriated for Community Development Block Grants (CDBG), of which MA is expected to receive approximately $29.4 million. Most of the funding goes directly to 36 cities and towns that have received CDBG funds in the past, although some funding is available for communities that do not directly receive CDBG funds. These funds are used at the local level for projects that provide housing and economic opportunities for low and moderate-income families. The table belowoutlines the amount of funding each of the 36 communities will be receiving from the expanded funding also known as CDBG-R.

In order for a nonprofit to receive these funds, they need to speak with their local government to find out if they are applying for a CDBG grant, and how the nonprofit could assist in providing services (i.e. workforce training) in the community if the local government receives the grant.

However, as you will note from the table, Massachusetts will also receive over $9 million to allocate to cities and towns not part of the 36 communities receiving CDBG formula funding. There are several different program components within the Massachusetts CDBG program administered by the Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD). Each component differs in purpose, application requirements, award levels, and grant cycles. These funds are intended to support municipalities with a population under 50,000 and other municipalities that do not receive CDBG funds directly from HUD.

Nonprofits located in communities that are not included in the aforementioned 36 should reach out to their municipal leaders about seeking funding from this pool.  In much the same way as traditional CDBG funding, those eligible communities may apply for a wide variety of community and economic development activities, including:

  • housing rehabilitation and housing related projects
  • infrastructure repair or replacement
  • construction or rehabilitation of community facilities
  • neighborhood improvement projects
  • economic development loans and other business assistance programs
  • social services projects
  • development improvement projects
  • architectural barrier removal projects
  • planning

DHCD reviews each application according to the respective program component’s evaluation criteria.  Each application must meet one of the National Objectives defined by HUD below:

  • benefit a majority of low- and moderate-income people;
  • aid in the prevention or elimination of slums and blight;
  • meet an urgent condition posing a serious threat to the health and welfare of the community where other financial resources are not available to meet such needs.

In addition to these requirements ARRA requires that each recipient provide a written description of how the use of CDBG-R funds for the activity will maximize job creation and economic benefit in relation to the CDBG-R funds obligated, and will address the Recovery Act, by:

    (A) Preserving and creating jobs and promoting economic recovery;
    (B) Assisting those most impacted by the recession;
    (C) Providing investment needed to increase economic efficiency;
    (D) Investing in transportation, environmental protection, or other infrastructure
    that will provide long-term economic benefits;
    (E) Minimizing or avoiding reductions in essential services; or
    (F) Fostering energy independence.

It is unclear at the moment as to when and how Massachusetts DHCD will allocate the additional funding from CDBG-R that is at its disposal. However, community based organizations should take note that HUD has stipulated in its guidelines to the states, including Massachusetts, that grantees are cautioned that, “despite the expedited application and plan process, they are still responsible for ensuring that all citizens have equal access to information about activities assisted with CDBG-R funds.”

Nonprofits should also take note that language in ARRA which appropriates the CDBG-R funds, states that, “…in selecting projects to be funded, recipients shall give priority to projects that can award contracts based on bids within 120 days from the date the funds are made available to the recipients… and recipients shall give preference to activities that can be started and completed expeditiously, including a goal of using at least 50 percent of the funds for activities that can be initiated not later than 120 days after the date of the enactment of this Act.”

For more information see: here

List of communities and amounts of funding under CDBG-R

    MA MA NONENTITLEMENT $9,103,174
    MA ARLINGTON $348,928
    MA ATTLEBORO $125,811
    MA BARNSTABLE $94,642
    MA BOSTON $5,366,011
    MA BROCKTON $398,596
    MA BROOKLINE $436,204
    MA CAMBRIDGE $851,070
    MA CHICOPEE $347,428
    MA FALL RIVER $805,818
    MA FITCHBURG $312,948
    MA FRAMINGHAM $143,643
    MA GLOUCESTER $212,436
    MA HAVERHILL $282,868
    MA HOLYOKE $360,646
    MA LAWRENCE $464,372
    MA LEOMINSTER $137,704
    MA LOWELL $639,803
    MA LYNN $675,437
    MA MALDEN $416,120
    MA MEDFORD $468,454
    MA NEW BEDFORD $802,671
    MA NEWTON $603,513
    MA NORTHAMPTON $201,513
    MA PEABODY CITY $124,662
    MA PITTSFIELD $401,213
    MA PLYMOUTH TOWN $106,390
    MA QUINCY $554,366
    MA SALEM $305,977
    MA SOMERVILLE $772,044
    MA SPRINGFIELD $1,111,756
    MA TAUNTON $236,442
    MA WALTHAM $286,106
    MA WESTFIELD $120,127
    MA WEYMOUTH $217,173
    MA WORCESTER $1,245,014
    MA YARMOUTH $37,747

Community Services Block Grant

ARRA appropriates $1 billion for the Community Services Block Grant (CSBG), a federally funded, antipoverty reduction program that was created in 1964 topromote and provide an array of services and activities to encourage self-sufficiency and to make permanent improvements in the lives of low-income families and individuals. CSBG provides core funding to 24 existing duly designated Community Action Agencies (CAAs). Each CAA is a private non-profit entity operated by a tripartite board representing private and public sectors and low-income people who reside or work in the designated service area. Massachusetts is expected to receive $24 million in additional funding (see the table below).

Services provided by CAAs include, but are not limited to:

    – Employment and job skills training
    – Food and nutrition assistance
    – Child development programs, including Head Start and center-based day care
    – Individual and family self-sufficiency initiatives
    – Youth development
    – Fuel and energy assistance
    – Domestic violence counseling and emergency assistance
    – Emergency assistance such as, temporary shelter, hunger, medical
    assistance, clothing, conflict resolution, etc.
    – Affordable housing and homeownership opportunities
    – Assistance to homeless and “at-risk” families and individuals
    – Transportation assistance

Administered by the Mass. Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD), each designated CAA is eligible for federal funding through an annual application process and required to submit a Community Action Plan every three years. However, under ARRA, there may be new opportunities for nonprofits to collaborate with CAA in delivering services. As part of DHCD’s “CSBG Recovery Act Work Plan” under ARRA, each eligible entity is required to include a description of how “new linkages will be developed to fill gaps in service identified during their Fiscal Year 2009 Community Action Planning and CSBG Recovery Act proposed project concept development process.” Furthermore, the descriptions are required to include a methodology for information dissemination, referral to “other services providers,” and case management follow-ups.

DHCD as a condition of receiving CSBG Recovery Act funds from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, has already prepared its Fiscal Year 2009 – 2010 Community Services Block Grant (CSBG) Plan and scheduled a public information session on the draft Recovery Act Plan for May 14, 2009 – 9:00 AM to 11:00 AM at the DHCD Conference Room B, 2nd Floor100 Cambridge Street, Boston, MA 02114

Click here to read the entire proposed state plan for use of Community Service Development Block Grant.

CAA Location CSBG Recovery Act Allocation TotalCAA/
Non-CSBG
Budget
# Served
ABCD Boston. $9,560,926 $127,217,286 88,509
ACTION Gloucester $458,924 $17,769,565 5,649
BCAC Pittsfield $629,171 $8,099,089 15,089
CEOC Cambridge $698,255 $1,081,492 19,714
CAAS Somerville $587,227 $4,488,327 1,867
CFC Fall River. $875,904 $26,841,785 31,900
CACCI Barnstable $572,421 $9,820,030 13,844
CAI Haverhill $476,196 $12,869,128 13,605
CA! Greenfield $1,026,412 $14,277,693 27,071
CAPIC Chelsea $503,337 $10,952,143 10,296
CTI Lowell $824,091 $63,840,759 34,251
GLCAC Lawrence $555,150 $25,236,593 19,575
LEO Lynn $715,530 $8,911,227 11,073
MOC Fitchburg $634,105 $16,724,045 22,352
NSCAP Peabody $545,280 $7,341,288 13,390
PACE New Bedford $774,745 $44,273,294 34,690
QCAP Quincy $453,990 $23,225,585 21,402
SHI Avon $737,733 $23,763,856 26,133
SMOC Framingham $500,870 $61,452,442 40,510
SSCAC Plymouth. $453,990 $14,409,644 19,734
SPCA Springfield $838,894 $2,616,969 5,967
TRI-CAP Malden. $668,647 $8,720,499 13,182
VOC Holyoke $562,553 $27,076,706 37,500
WCAC Worcester $1,019,009 $16,428,237 25,005

Total
$24,673,360 $577,437,682 $552,309

Helpful websites:

Full list of federal grants available through the Recovery Act

Medicaid and Healthcare

Nutrition

Housing, Infrastructure, Economic Development

Unemployment Services:

Environment and Energy:

Save the dates:

  • May 29 – Nonprofit Congress-Boston area meeting
  • June 8 – Nonprofit Awareness Day and Nonprofit Excellence Awards Ceremony
  • November 13 – MNN / Associated Grant Makers Annual Conference – “Grantmakers and Grantees for the Common Good” | Sheraton Framingham

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Federal Stimulus Act–Newsletter2

Stimulus and Nonprofits , Vol. 2 – MNN’s  ARRA Newsletter – April 20, 2009

Dear Nonprofit Leader,

I hope that you made good use of MNN’s (introductory) ARRA Newsletter, Volume 1, that went out two weeks ago. It has important background and introductory data that you may want to reference on a regular basis
(www.massnonprofitnet.org). Each volume will include links to previous volumes for your reference. Today we present Volume 2 of our research on the opportunities fcor nonprofits to participate in the economic recovery of our county. Please let us know if is useful and how it can be made more so and please share it.

Thank you to The Boston Foundation for generously providing the financial support needed for this project.

Sincerely,

Dave Magnani,
Executive Director
617-330-1188

To view Stimulus and Nonprofits, Volume 1 and for more information on the Massachusetts Nonprofit Network, please visit our website.

If this edition has been forwarded to you and you would like to receive future volumes please email us your name and organization.

This is the second in a series of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) updates by the Mass. Nonprofit Network. Our goal is to continue to provide you with the most current information available on information about ARRA funding available to Massachusetts nonprofits as well as tools and tips for accessing those funds. As time goes by many of the specifics regarding funding levels and possible relevance to the nonprofit sector continue to become clearer.

As we described in our first newsletter, the bulk of the ARRA funding is being distributed by relevant federal agencies, primarily through existing programs/mechanisms. The amounts of funding depend on various funding distribution methods, including formula-based allocations, direct contracts and competitive grant processes. The recipients of the funds include the Commonwealth, municipalities, and private entities, depending on the program. For a general overview of ARRA and its impact on Massachusetts and the nonprofit sector please see our April 6th newsletter at our website.

Where we are right now.

Of the $787 billion that will be spent through ARRA over the next two years, $370 billion will be distributed through formula and block grants to the states. An additional $85 billion will be distributed through competitive grants (where the federal government issues a grant to an organization to perform certain functions) and another $65 billion will be distributed through direct contracts (where the federal government hires a particular entity to do something). To date, the government has obligated (distributed) $40 billion, which means that there is still an additional $480 billion that has not yet been distributed.

Because ARRA imposes specific deadlines on different federal agencies to get funding for particular programs out by certain times, the timelines for applying for and getting funds depend on the agency making the allocation and the programs being funded. While at this point it is fairly clear what formula and block grant funding Massachusetts agencies and municipalities will be receiving, many state and local agencies are still in the process of mapping out the specifics of the allocation process. Moreover, while some federal competitive grants (available to state, municipal and private entities) have already been announced, many others are being designed and it is expected that there will be a large number that will be announced soon, most likely in the months of July and August. It is also expected that many of these grants will have relatively short turnaround times from notice to when the application is due (in some cases as little as two weeks).

Continued Guidance for Accessing Funding

  • Continue to read over information on grants- with an eye towards how you might fill the core function (a list of important websites is attached). Nonprofits should spend time reviewing the principal federal website for ARRA here as well as the Massachusetts ARRA website here. The federal Grants Management System website is extremely useful for finding federal grant information. Specifically, here you can search for grants that have been funded by ARRA. The website provides deadlines and eligibility, as well as detailed descriptions of the programs. For direct contracts or federal business opportunities nonprofits should search here.
  • If you are fairly certain that you will be applying for a federal grant, it is highly recommended that you complete as much of the pre-application work as soon as possible. The steps in this process normally – without the increased demand caused by ARRA – can take up to a couple of weeks each.  For example, applicants will require a Data Universal Number (DUNS number). Most large organizations, independent libraries, colleges and research universities already have DUNS numbers. Once a DUNS number is obtained, organizations need to use that number to register with the Central Contractor Registration (CCR) as well as set up an Authorized Organization Representative (AOR), a process designed to safeguard your organization from individuals who may attempt to submit grant application packages without permission. The following link can walk you through the entire pre-application process here.
  • Small and midsized nonprofits should consider ways to collaborate with each other and use their local connections and creativity to take advantage of mission-related opportunities. Nonprofits in Massachusetts may wish to consider ways in which they might be able to apply a particular expertise or skill to a region of the state without similar resources. For example, nonprofits that provide job training services should consider areas of the state that have experienced unprecedented unemployment and corresponding demand for job training services and where existing providers are at capacity or do not have breath of services needed. 
  • Nonprofits should continue to reach out to local officials. As was outlined in our previous newsletter, a sizable portion of ARRA funding will be administered directly by municipal leaders. Because some of the federal funds flowing to states and local governments formally will require receiving governments to have community partners, it is wise to make sure that these officials understand ways in which you can help them to deliver critical services.

Health and Human Services

Competitive Grants
There are many National Institute of Health Grants which have been made available by ARRA, including:

  • NIH Challenge Grants (deadline April 27, 2009) – As part of the Recovery Act, the NIH invites, through this limited competition, NIH Challenge Grant (RC1) applications from domestic (United States) institutions/organizations proposing novel research in areas that address specific knowledge gaps, scientific opportunities, new technologies, data generation, or research methods that would benefit from an influx of funds to quickly advance the area in significant ways. This program is designed to support resear.ch in scientific areas identified by the Institutes and Centers. Non profits are eligible to apply.

NIH Grant Opportunity (GO) grants (Letters of Intent Receipt Date(s): April 27, 2009) (deadline: May 27th)  – This new program will support projects that address large, specific biomedical and biobehavioral research endeavors that will benefit from significant 2-year funds without the expectation of continued NIH funding beyond two years. The research supported by the “GO” grants program should have high short-term impact, and a high likelihood of enabling growth and investment in biomedical research and development, public health, and health care delivery. Non profits are eligible to apply.

Please visit here and use the search term ‘non-profit’ to view the full list of grants, some 0f which are available to nonprofits.

State Agencies
The U.S. Department of Homeland Security announced April 9th that $1.9 million will be coming to Massachusetts for the Emergency Food and Shelter Program through a FEMA grant. The funds will provide nonprofit and faith-based organizations at the local level to supplement their programs for emergency food and shelter and provide for the immediate needs of the homeless.

The Emergency Food and Shelter Program uses measures of unemployment and poverty to allocate the funds it receives from FEMA to city and county jurisdictions throughout the country. To serve areas in need that do not qualify based on this formula, a State Set-Aside Program exists to award additional funds to each state based on extenuating circumstances, including recent spikes in unemployment and pockets of homelessness or poverty. In addition to the State Set-Aside Committee, the following counties in MA are set to receive funding: Barnstable, Berkshire, Bristol, Essex, Hampden, Middlesex, Plymouth, Suffolk, and Worcester. For a listing of counties in MA receiving funding and funding amounts, visit here.

Locally, the program is a model of public-private cooperation. Each civil jurisdiction (a county or city) funded by the program must constitute a Local Board. The board must be comprised of representatives of the American Red Cross; Catholic Charities, USA; United Jewish Communities; The National Council of the Churches of Christ in the U.S.A.; The Salvation Army; and United Way of America, with a local government official serving as chair of the board. Various Local Boards may also have additional members. Local Boards decide which agencies are to receive funds, and then those agencies are paid directly by the National Board. We recommend that those interested in this funding contact one of their local organizations sitting on the local boards. For more information on the Emergency Food and Shelter Program, visit here.

Children and Families

Competitive Grants
Recovery Act Local Youth Mentoring Initiative, administered by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP), one of the Office of Justice Programs (OJP), will award money to support local organizations that develop, implement, or expand local mentoring programs leading to measurable, positive outcomes for at-risk youth.

OJJDP invites applications from new or existing mentoring programs with proven track records that aim to implement activities in accordance with the goals and objectives outlined in this solicitation. Applicants should also present evidence-based programs or incorporate best practices based on research and consider a variety of mentoring approaches. Special consideration will be given to mentoring programs that include education, job readiness, employment skill development, and training in and exposure to entrepreneurial activities.

Applications must be submitted through OJP’s online Grants Management System (GMS). To access the system and apply go to the website: link. However you must register and apply by 8:00pm Monday April 20th. Instructions of how to register can be found here.

Elder Services

Direct Federal Funding

According to the Administration on Aging within the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Massachusetts is receiving $2.1 million in nutrition stimulus fundsto be primarily used for providing congregate and home delivered meals to seniors and to create or retain jobs associated with the provision of meals.The funding will flow to the AAA (federally designated Area Agencies on Aging) as required of all Title III funding. For a listing on funding distribution for nutrition services to states, visit here.

Competitive Grants

Community Service Employment of Older Americans – $120 million formula grant available through June 30, 2010. The Senior Service Employment Program is acommunity service and work-based training program for older workers.Program participants are placed in a wide variety of community service positions at non-profit and public facilities, including daycare centers, senior centers, governmental agencies, schools, hospitals, libraries and landscaping centers. 78% of this grant award money is going to 18 national nonprofit organizations (including: AARP Foundation, Asociacion Nacional pro Persons Mayores, Easter Seals, Experience Works, Goodwill Industries International, Institute for Indian Development, Mature Services, National Able Network, National Asian Pacific Center on Aging, National Caucus and Center on Black Aged, National Urban League, Quality Career Services, Senior Service America, SER-Jobs for Progress National, Vermont Associates for Training and Development, and The Workplace).

The other 22% of the money will be going to 56 state and territorial governments. In most states, the governor has selected the State Office on Aging to administer the program. For contact information go here.

Labor and Workforce Development

Governor Patrick recently announced plans to combine $6.67 million from the state’s YouthWorks summer jobs program with $3.1 million in public safety funds and $21.1 million in youth workforce development funds provided through ARRA. The administration hopes to maximize state and federal resources in an effort to increase the number of jobs for eligible young people between the ages of 14-24 to an estimated 11,000 in 60 communities across the state. This funding comes with strict standards on how it can be spent and on whom it can be spent. Income guidelines narrow the field of potential candidates to those who come from extremely poor families.

Summer jobs for youth across the state are managed by Massachusetts’ sixteen local workforce investment boards (LWIBs). Annual program funds under the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) support summer jobs as well as other youth services, which are made available through a network of contracted vendors. Background information on WIA is available here. A listing of LWIBs and their vendors is available at here.

YouthWorks (YW) program grants represent funds appropriated in the state budget. These are available to youth in 25 targeted cities. However, ARRA Recovery Act resources were also awarded to the local Workforce Investment Boards by the Executive Office of Public Safety and Security (EOPSS). These funds are available to youth who reside in 35 cities that are not covered by YouthWorks (for a list of eligible cities, see EOPSS and YW List of Cities).

Massachusetts will also be receiving $21 million as a supplement to WIA funds awarded to Local Workforce Investment Boards on a formula basis for adult dislocated workers and another $10 million for job training and employment services for low income adults. The funds for employment and training have a short window for use. Regional workforce systems will need to develop initiatives that can be implemented very quickly. The Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development (EOLWD) has indicated that adult basic education services (including ESOL) are a priority for the state and that partnering with providers is critical.

Massachusetts will also be receiving $ 8 million for the Commonwealth Corporation that will be earmarked for the state’s Workforce Competitive Trust Fund. WCTF is a three-year initiative focused on several critical industry sectors. It is designed to enable a broad range of residents-including older workers, low-wage workers, low-income individuals, disabled citizens, vulnerable youth, incumbent workers and the unemployed-to gain access to employment, education and the skills necessary to move forward along a career path leading to economic self-sufficiency.

Massachusetts will use $8 million of the state share of Wagner-Peyser Act funding for reemployment services (RES) to connect unemployment insurance claimants to employment and training opportunities designed to facilitate their reentry to employment.

Clean Energy and Environment

Competitive Grants
National Clean Diesel Funding Assistance Program is a competitive grant program and funding from it must be used to achieve significant reductions in diesel emissions in terms of tons of pollution produced and diesel emissions exposure (particularly from fleets operating in areas designated by the Administrator as poor air quality areas), and the project must demonstrate the ability to maximize job preservation and creation. The awards for this program will go directly from the EPA Regional office to the recipient. Must apply by April 27, 2009. To apply, the nonprofit organization or institution must represent or provide pollution reduction or educational services to persons or organizations that own or operate diesel fleets; or have, as its principal purpose, the promotion of transportation or air quality. Although this is a National competition, applicants must submit applications to the EPA Region in which the project will take place. Assistance agreements funded under this announcement will be evaluated and awarded by each of EPA’s ten Regional Offices link.

  • The clean diesel funding is divided into 4 different programs: diesel funding assistance, emerging diesel technology, SmartWay Clean Diesel finance, and State based clean diesel grants.

Brownfields Assessment, Revolving Loan Fund, and Cleanup Program is a competitive grant with $100 million to be used for clean up, revitalization, and sustainable reuse of contaminated properties. The funds will be awarded to eligible entities through job training, assessment, revolving loan fund, and cleanup grants. For more information, visit here.

Additional $5 million in Job Training Grants RFA from eligible governmental entities and nonprofit organizations to provide environmental job training projects that will facilitate job creation in the assessment, remediation, or preparation of brownfields sites for sustainable reuse. While the closing date for receipt of applications was April 20, 2009, for more information about Brownfields Job Training Grants, visit: here.

Education

State Agencies

As discussed in our last newsletter, MA will receive about $181 million as a “flexible block grant” to be spent to avert budget cuts in education or in other basic state services, such as public safety and law enforcement, services for the elderly and people with disabilities, or child care. These funds can also be used for school modernization, renovation, or repair. The funding is available to states immediately.

The Governor’s office received the state’s application for this grant on April 1st and has asked his Secretariats to submit proposals on how to spend it.  The Secretariats are currently working on those.  If your organization does work in any of the above listed areas, then you should contact the Secretary of the relevant agency and request that they include funding for your program as part of what they submit to the Governor.  It is most likely that programs that have received funding in the past will receive the funding. Therefore, if you have received funding via an earmark, line-item, or a specific grant administered by an agency, then you should propose to be funded (and work with other organizations that received funding as part of the same mechanism).

Competitive Grants
Head Start and Early Head Start grant applications are going to become available within the coming weeks. Head Start Expansion will get $199,612,157 and Early Head Start Expansion will get $1,156,612,157.

Head Start (HHS-2009-ACF-OHS-SH-0089): Eligible applicants are limited to current Federally-funded Head Start agencies. They plan on giving out roughly 200 awards of funding up 1.02 billion in funding. There is no posted close date for the grant yet, and the full announcement and application was not available.

Early Head Start (HHS-2009-ACF-OHS-SA-0087): Many entities are eligible for funding including, nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, for profit organizations, and small businesses. They plan on giving out 600 awards totally 619 million dollars. There is no link available for the full announcement and there is not current close date.

For both of these grants, the site said that the full announcement and application would be available in the coming weeks.

Municipalities/Localities
The Governor also announced that of the $813M stabilization funding the state is receiving for education, $168M is being spent to bring all MA schools up to foundation level spending, $280M is being spent for special education funding, and $162M for is being spent for higher education to allow UMass to roll back fee increases for students.

The $163 million in additional federal education Title I funds from ARRA will go to many high-poverty school districts in Massachusetts. Title I funds are targeted to help the districts and schools in the Commonwealth that serve the highest concentration of low-income students. The funds will help districts retain specialist teachers that help struggling readers, purchase books, technology, and other instructional materials that help students who are behind their peers receive the support and instruction they need. Additionally, the funds will be used to help teachers obtain training to better educate English Language Learners, and others with special learning needs.

Funds will go directly to Local Education Agency’s (LEAs) based on a federal formula. The first half of Title I funds will be distributed in July and the remaining funds will be allocated in the fall. The state has no say in how the LEAs spend the money; however, the LEAs will be responsible for adhering to the regulations set out in this federal program. School districts do have the responsibility to obligate at least 85% of the total FY2009 Title I, Party A funds (including ARRA funds) by September 30, 2010, and all remaining funds must be obligated by September 30, 2011. Districts receiving some of the largest payouts with the first half of funding include Boston (approx. $21 million); Springfield (approx. $8.7 million); Worcester (approx. $4 million); Lawrence (approx. $3.2 million); Holyoke (approx. $3.1 million); and Lynn (approx. $2.7 million). For a complete list of school districts and the money they are set to receive with the first half of funds, visit: here.

Higher Education

State Agencies
The Governor has announced $162M for higher education, which allows UMass to roll back fee increases for students.

Direct Funding to Individuals
The “Hope Credit” provides a tax subsidy for college tuition costs. Its goal, in part, is to enable students who could not otherwise afford to attend college to do so. The economic recovery package addresses this issue by providing funding for the program. It contains a measure to enlarge the “Hope Credit” for students from middle-income families and to partially extend this tax credit for the first time to students from lower-income families. Previously, the credit was “non-refundable,” meaning that it could only be used to offset a family’s federal income tax liability. Families whose incomes were too low to owe federal income tax could not benefit from the credit at all. The new credit is “refundable,” meaning that lower-income households that have limited or no federal income tax liability to offset can now receive a partial credit in the form of a tax “refund” (grant) of up to 40 percent of qualifying expenses. The recovery package increases the maximum “Hope Credit” from $1,800 to $2,500, and allows it to be claimed for a maximum of four years of qualifying education instead of the previous limit of two years. It is estimated that 3.8 million low-income students will benefit from this tax credit. It is further estimated that roughly 71,000 Massachusetts students will benefit as well.

Housing and Community Development

Municipalities/Localities
On April 3rd, the Governor announced $108M in funding from several state and federal affordable housing programs and tax credits to help support 39 affordable rental housing projects, yielding more than 2,000 affordable housing units across Massachusetts, while helping to create thousands of jobs. To view the Governor’s press release, visit here. To see the award list, visit here.

Of the 39 organizations that received funding on April 2nd from the Governor, 12 of them were members of the Mass. Association of Community Development Corporations (MACDC). A number of the projects not given to an MACDC member were given to a few large development firms such as Winn Development, Trinity Investment, and Bank of America CDC.

In the city of Boston, funds are currently available from the following sources for Rental and Cooperative Housing Production: HOME Investment Partnership Program, Community Development Block Grant and City of Boston Leading the Way for the development of affordable housing. The Department of Neighborhood Development will make available $4,000,000 for Rental and Cooperative Housing through these programs. Both for-profit and non-profit developers are eligible to apply for funding. The RFP package is available at the DND, and the proposals are due by 4pm on May 1, 2009 at 26 Court Street, 10th Floor, in Boston link

The City of Boston’s Department of Neighborhood Development recently allocated $4,000,000 for its Neighborhood Stabilization Program for the acquisition and rehabilitation of foreclosed and abandoned properties in order to create new homeownership and affordable rental housing. This funding is designed to ensure that those vulnerable, high-risk neighborhoods where foreclosures are prevalent receive help from the City and its partners to renew and reoccupy properties. An applicant packet is available at the DND, Bid Counter, 26 Court Street, 10th Floor, Boston, MA 02108 or online at www.dnd.gov. This is a rolling application program that closes June 17, 2010, or until funds are expended link.

Competitive Grants
Round 2 of the Federal Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP) applications are due September 1, 2009. Competitive grants awarded for activities eligible under division B, title III of the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008 (Public Law 110-289, NSP round 1), to address home foreclosure and abandonment and for the provision of capacity building and support for NSP grantees. Rating factors will include grantee capacity to execute projects, leveraging potential, and concentration of investment to achieve neighborhood stabilization. Grantees must expend at least 50 percent of each grant within 2 years and 100 percent within 3 years of grant award. HUD may run two competitions – one addressing the provision of technical assistance (not to exceed $50 million) and one to provide programmatic funding for grantees (remainder of funding). Eligible applicants are states, units of general local government, nonprofit entities, and consortia of nonprofit entities, which may submit proposals in partnership with for profit entities. To apply go here.

Deadline for Public Housing Capital Fund (allocation of funds for grants, including those that leverage private funding or finance energy conservation renovations or retrofits) is September 30th.

Helpful websites:

Full list of federal grants available through the Recovery Act

Medicaid and Healthcare

Nutrition

Housing, Infrastructure, Economic Development

Unemployment Services:

Environment and Energy:

Save the dates:

  • May 29 – Nonprofit Congress-Boston area meeting
  • June 8 – Nonprofit Awareness Day and Nonprofit Excellence Awards Ceremony
  • November 13 – MNN / Associated Grant Makers Annual Conference – “Grantmakers and Grantees for the Common Good” | Sheraton Framingham

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Federal Stimulus Act-Newsletter1

Stimulus and Nonprofits – MNN’s first ARRA Newsletter- April 6, 2009

Welcome!

It is our hope that we can provide you with some basic guidance on the location of different pots of funding, and, in the coming weeks, provide you with more specific details and other relevant information.

Sincerely,

Dave Magnani,
Executive Director
617-330-1188

Overview

The ARRA and Nonprofits: Signed by President Obama on February 17, 2009, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (The Economic Stimulus Package, commonly referred to as ARRA) has two principal goals. The first goal is to inject significant federal funding into our national economy to save or create jobs that reinvigorate our economy and to assist those most impacted by the recession.The second goal is to ensure that the bulk of the federal government’s spending is used to make major investments in transportation, environmental protection, technological advances in science and health and other infrastructureimprovements that will provide long-term economic benefit to the country.  Governor Patrick, in outlining the goals of the Commonwealth for its share of the responsibility for the use of these funds, has described it as “delivering relief now while investing in tomorrow.”

While public perception of the ARRA might focus on building roads and bridges and private sector investments, in reality, the vast majority of the ARRA funding is ideally suited to the enormously broad nonprofit sector for the delivery of services. It is our goal to monitor and analyze this funding and determine how nonprofits here in Massachusetts can best access funding. This first newsletter is designed to provide the Massachusetts nonprofit sector with information known to date on a broad spectrum of funding opportunities. In subsequent newsletters we will keep you abreast of prospective funding streams for nonprofit organizations here in Massachusetts, including relevant dates and deadlines as they become available.

As you know by know, it is estimated that over the course of two years, Massachusetts will receive approximately $8.7 billion in federal stimulus funds, plus an additional $5.2 billion through tax benefits to residents of the Commonwealth. Despite the perception that the federal government wrote each governor a large check for each of them to distribute to their state as they saw fit, the reality is that ARRA funding is targeted for various specific purposes. The bulk of the funding is being distributed by relevant federal agencies, primarily through existing programs/mechanisms. The amounts of funding depend on various funding distribution methods, including formula-based allocations and competitive grant processes. The recipients of the funds include the Commonwealth, municipalities, and private entities, depending on the program. Even those grants that the federal government is mandated to award to a state still require states (or state agencies) to submit an acceptable state plan or application that meets the eligibility and compliance requirements of the grant program. It is only upon completion and acceptance of that plan that states will be award funding for them to distribute.

While much is known about funding opportunities, much is still undecided, specifically with regards to the funding that will be allocated through state agencies (Massachusetts agencies are still in the process of applying for grants from the federal government). On the other hand, deadlines for RFAs from the federal government are quickly approaching. If you plan to apply for these grants, be sure to read over the guidelines very closely and ensure that your application addresses how your organization can meet the specific needs of the grant as the goals in these grants are very specific. Some provisions of ARRA limit eligible applicants to those that were funded in 2008 for the same program. On the other hand, there are some grant opportunities that are not available to current grantees and consequently only open to new applicants.The ARRA is emergency legislation and the Obama Administration wants action quickly after funding decisions are made. The published RFAs will state how quickly a successful applicant must have the program up and running. Look for that deadline in the RFA.

We would also suggest that you take a number of steps right now to better position your organization to receive funding, including:

  • Carefully reading over various grant opportunities that are presently available that might speak to your organization’s core strengths.
  • Reaching out to other organizations to collaborate on proposals.
  • Looking into the possibility of serving as a subcontractor of services to a principal applicant. In fact, there are several programs that require for-profit companies to include a nonprofit organization in the application and the work plan.
  • Reaching out to officials at the municipal level who will be administering various pools of funds. Seeking out allies in the form of elected officials at the state and federal level who can advocate for your organization or constituency.

In outlining the present funding opportunities, we have divided the fields into various categories depending on the core function of the funding. Under each category we further subdivide the access points into:
1)      Municipalities/localities
2)      State Agencies
3)      Federal Funding that is directly given to programs
4)      Federal Funding that is administered through grants

Health and Human Services

Municipalities/localities

MA is receiving approximately $44.8 million for homelessness prevention. Of this, 75% will be distributed to cities and towns that receive Emergency Shelter Grant Program funds.  This funding will be used to help homeless individuals and families get housing, or prevent individuals and families from becoming homeless. If you are interested in receiving this funding, contact your local government to find out if they are applying for this block grant, and if so, how your organization can play a role. A significant portion of this funding is to be used only for homelessness prevention activities (not shelters) such as rental assistance, housing stabilization, and housing relocation services, including security or utility deposits.

MA is receiving approximately $24.8 million for community service block grants(CSBG) which aim to reduce poverty. These funds are distributed at the local level, but states must apply to receive them. There does not appear to be any specific information yet on these funds, but for more information contact one of the 24 existing duly designated community action centers the CSBG provides core funding. Each CAA is a private non-profit entity operated by a tripartite board representing private and public sectors and low-income people who reside or work in the designated service area.

State Agencies

On March 25th, Governor Patrick announced that Massachusetts would be receiving $764 million in federal recovery funds for health care and safety net services. A significant portion of this funding will be going directly to the state’s Medicaid program, increasing the federal matching dollars from 50% to between 56.2 and 61.6%, depending on spending patterns and unemployment levels in the state.  This increased funding will allow the state to fund the proposals that the Governor outlined in his FY10 budget proposal, including $10 million for community health centers and $5 million for health care providers. In essence, the impact of this funding source is that it will allow the state to maintain critical existing services that rely on the Medicaid match. Once RFPs are announced for these funds, we will inform you. In addition, depending on how much of this funding is over the Governor’s and Legislature’s proposed FY10 budgets, there could be even more Medicaid money available (up to an additional $3.1 billion over two years).  The Governor’s office should soon be announcing how they expect to spend the funds that are on top of those already included in his H1 budget proposal. One option could to be to improve provider rates.

Direct Federal Grants

ARRA appropriates $25 billion over two years to our nation’s community health centers ($500 million in direct grants, $1.5 billion for capital projects and health information technology and $500 million for primary care workforce development). On March 27th, The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced the release of $338 million to expand services offered by community health centers.  The grants — titled Increased Demand for Services (IDS) grants – are being distributed to 1,128 federally qualified health center grantees, including 36 in Massachusetts who received approximately $8.6 million in funding to be used over the next two years to create or retain 245 health center jobs in MA. The IDS awards are the second set of health center grants provided through the Recovery Act.

Competitive Grants

The first set of health center grants was initiated on March 2nd when President Obama announced grants worth $155 million in funding for the construction and expansion of community health centers, including $1.3 million that was awarded to the North Shore Community Health Center. North Shore, the only community center in MA to receive funding in the first round, was successful, in part, by highlighting the high level of need in the Gloucester area. Additionally, North Shore was already on a list of “approved but unfunded” health-center projects, having applied in 2007. It is believed Administration officials used that list as the basis for awarding this first round of funding.

ARRA appropriates $11.1 billion over 2 years to support health research and capital improvements to research facilities. The bulk of this funding will go to support research applications that have already been reviewed, and those submitted in fiscal 2008 and 2009 that have been judged for merit but did not receive awards because of fiscal constraints. Some of the money will go to projects that speed up research in high-priority areas that are already being conducted under existing grants. These awards will be based on themes, such as equipment, training, and summer student jobs. An estimate of between $100 million and $200 million will start a new program called NIH Challenge Grants. This program will solicit applications in focus areas determined by the institutes, and the awards will be based on peer review and support specific scientific and health research challenges in biomedical and behavioral research. The deadline to apply for these funds is April 27, 2009. There are a number of different health research grants available, including those specifically focused on autism.

Children and Families

State Agencies

Massachusetts is expected to receive approximately $23.9 through the child care development block grant (CCDBG). These funds are not permitted to be used in replacement of state funding, but to supplement it. It is not yet clear how this funding will be disbursed, but RFPs should be announced soon by the Dept. of Early Education and Care.

Direct Federal Funding

$1 billion has been allocated for regular Head Start programs.   These funds must be spent on programs that receive federal money to provide early education to low income children through this program.

Competitive Grants
$1.1 billion for Early Head Start will be distributed through a competitive application process. This funding is available for organizations that want to start a new Early Head Start Program. For more information.

Grant for youth mentoring. The application deadline is April 20. For more information.

Competitive grants for transitional housing assistance for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, stalking or sexual assault. Grants are up to $500,000 and the current deadline is April 8, 2009. For more information.

YouthBuild grants are provided to non-profit organizations to assist high-risk youth between the ages of 16-24 to learn housing construction job skills and to complete their high school education. The federal economic stimulus package increased these grants by $50 million. For more information.

Elder Services

State Agencies

On March 21st, Governor Patrick announced more that over $300 million was coming to Massachusetts to help boost Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits and to increase nutritional services for elders. Some of this funding will go directly to elders through the federal Food Stamp program. However, between $1.2 million and $1.4 million will go to senior centers with nutrition programs.  Twenty-seven senior centers have already been identified. No information is yet available on whether organizations can still apply for these funds. We will notify you as soon as we know.

Competitive Grants

Competitive grants for the “Community Service Employment for Older Americans program.” This is only open to current grantees in proportion to their allotment in 2008.

Labor and Workforce Development

State Agencies

It is expected that the Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development will make an announcement in the coming weeks regarding the approximately $64 million in new funding that is coming to Massachusetts for youth activities, dislocated worker employment and training, and adult employment and training. This funding will be distributed to the 16 Workforce Investment Boards. If your organization is interested in providing these services, contact your local board. RFPs for Boston will be announced at the end of April. The money needs to be obligated by June 30th.
Competitive Grants

ARRA contains $750 million for competitive grants to train workers for high need fields (priority given to “green” jobs and health care).  For more information, please visit The United States Department of Labor.  No specific information is currently available for a deadline, but it should be shortly.

Nonprofits can directly apply for the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) Program, which is meant tofund job retention and creation to reduce crime. Prevention, education, and community programs are applicable. Applications are due April 27, 2009.

Clean Energy and Environment

Municipalities/Localities

Cities and towns can apply for Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants to help reduce total energy consumption. In order for a nonprofit to receive these funds, they need to speak with their local government to find out if they are applying for a block grant, and how the nonprofit could assist in providing services (i.e. propose ways to increase use of renewable sources of energy) in the community if the local government receives the grant.
Competitive Grants

Competitive grant program for energy efficiency and conservation. The deadline for this grant is June 25, 2009. For more information, please visit the grants.gov RFP .

Competitive grant open to nonprofits that provide environmental job training projects that will promote job creation and economic development by facilitating the assessment, remediation, or preparation of Brownfields sites. Application deadline is April 20, 2009.  For more information, please visit the EPA Information Related to the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.

Education

State Agencies

MA is receiving $994 million through the State Fiscal Stabilization Fund (designed principally to stave off cuts in education). Of this, MA will use approximately $813 million on supporting K-12 and higher education during state fiscal years 2009, 2010, and 2011.  The funds must first be used to restore state funding for K-12 and higher education up to the FY08 or FY09 level, whichever is higher, and to maintain that level through FY11.  They can also be used to allow the phase-in of previously enacted equity and adequacy adjustments.  Any funds remaining, once the accounts have been made whole, are to be directed into Title I (Elementary and Secondary Education) formula grants.

MA will also receive about $181 million as a “flexible block grant” to be spent on education, public safety and provide for public safety and other government services, which may include elementary, secondary, as well as higher education.  The funds may also be used for modernization, renovation, or repair activities, consistent with state law, of elementary, secondary, and higher education (public and private) buildings and facilities.

It is unclear how Massachusetts nonprofits might access this increased education funding, but we are looking into this closer and will provide more information once it is available.

Higher Education

State Agencies

The amount potentially available to higher education is still extremely uncertain and is contingent upon the interpretation of various variables. An estimate for the total MA will receive for FY09, FY10, and FY11 is approximately $196 million, based on proportional basis. According to the Department of Higher Education, if the Governor determines that the education block grants are an insufficient amount to support, in each of the fiscal year 2009, 2010 and 2011, public elementary, secondary and higher education as the levels described… “The governor shall allocate those funds between those sectors in proportion to the relative shortfall in State support for the education sectors…” Using this formula, the Dept. of Higher Education projected $196 million. Funding received under this program “shall be used for education and general expenditures designed to mitigate the need to raise tuition for in-state students or for the modernization, renovation, or repair of facilities that are primarily used for instruction, research, or student housing, including modernization, renovation, and repairs that are consistent with a recognized green building rating system.  These funds may not be used to increase an endowment; maintain systems, equipment, or facilities; or for facilities primarily used for athletic events, exhibitions, or religious activities.”

Competitive Grants

Community colleges can tap into a number of resources for funding in the economic stimulus package that we listed in previous sections of this newsletter.

  • Research grants under “Health and Human Services” subheading
  • Energy efficiency and conservation block grants under the “Clean Energy and Environment” subheading
  • Workforce training grants under the “Labor and Workforce Development’ subheading

Additional Grants available:

  • Higher Education Teacher Quality Enhancement Grants Program (HEA-Title II, Part A)
  • Broadband Technology Opportunities Program-Expands public computer center capacity, including those at community colleges and public libraries. This fund expires September 30, 2010.
  • Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service-Buildings and Facilities
  • Department of Agriculture:  Rural Distance Learning, Telemedicine and Broadband Program for the cost of broadband loans, loan guarantees, and grants
  • Community College and Career Training Grant Program

Housing and Community Development

Municipalities/Localities

Over $1 billion of the federal economic stimulus bill was appropriated for Community Development Block Grants (CDBG), of which MA is expected to receive approximately $29.4 million. Most of the funding goes directly to cities that have received CDBG funds in the past, although some funding is available for communities that do not directly receive CDBG funds. These funds are used at the local level for projects that provide housing and economic opportunities for low and moderate-income families. In order for a nonprofit to receive these funds, they need to speak with their local government to find out if they are applying for a CDBG grant, and how the nonprofit could assist in providing services (i.e. workforce training) in the community if the local government receives the grant. For more information, contact one of the 36 community sites in MA.

ARRA allocates $1.5 billion to the HOME Investment Partnerships Program. These funds will be allocated in the form of grants to states and local government to implement local housing strategies designed to increase homeownership and affordable housing opportunities for low- and very low-income Americans.  It is expected that state or local government work in partnership with non-profit organizations.  Nonprofits should reach out to their local government to determine if they have applied for this grant and offer to work with them.

State Agencies

The state will also most likely be receiving a HOME grant. We will share information with you on RFPs through the state once it is available.


Competitive Grants

There is a competitive grant that is open to nonprofits to buy and rehabilitate foreclosed properties and other projects to stabilize neighborhoods and create affordable housing.  The deadline for this grant is September 1, 2009. For more information, please visit the Neighborhood Stabilization Program RFP.

Competitive grants for transitional housing assistance for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, stalking or sexual assault. Grants are up to $500,000 and the current deadline is April 8, 2009. For more information, please visit the United States Department of Justice Recovery Information.

Arts

State Agencies

The National Endowment for the Arts will be distributing 40% of the $50 million that was allocated to the designated 56 state and jurisdictional arts agencies and their six authorized regional arts organizations. The application deadline for state arts agencies and regional arts organizations was March 13, 2009. Nonprofits should reach out to these agencies and organizations to find out if they did apply, and how their organization could be involved. To contact the MA agency visit theMassachusetts Cultural Council.

Competitive Grants

60% of the $50 million will be available through competitive grants. These direct grants will be available to nonprofit arts organizations including local arts agencies, statewide assemblies of local arts agencies, arts service organizations, and other arts organizations. Applicants must have received NEA funding in the last four years to be eligible to apply. The application deadline for nonprofit arts organizations was April 2, 2009.  It is unclear as to if there will be a second round of grants.

Running Your Nonprofit – Staff, Office Equipment, Etc.

Competitive Grants

Funding for nonprofits to hire students in the summer as part of the YouthWorks program.  MA plans to create an estimated 10,000 summer jobs. If you are interested in hiring a teen visit the EPA website

The Small Business Administration (SBA) makes funds available to nonprofit community based lenders (intermediaries) which, in turn, make loans to eligible borrowers in amounts up to a maximum of $35,000. The average loan size is about $13,000. Applications are submitted to the local intermediary and all credit decisions are made on the local level. Visit the Office of Labor and Workforce Development for more information.

AmeriCorps grants are awarded to eligible organizations to recruit, train, and manage AmeriCorps members who address community needs. An AmeriCorps member is an individual who is enrolled in an approved national service position and engages in community service. Members may receive a living allowance while serving. This funding is only available to organizations that currently have AmeriCorps volunteers. For more information, please visit the Corporation for National and Community Service.
Competitive grants to provide broadband access to consumers in under served areas and trainings to schools, libraries, medical and health care providers, community colleges, and community support organizations to facilitate greater use of broadband by these organizations for low-income, unemployed, aged, or other vulnerable populations. This fund expires September 30, 2010. For more information, please visit the US Dept of Energy Recovery Website .
Below are some helpful websites:

Medicare & Healthcare

Nutrition

Housing, Infrastructure, Economic Development

Unemployment Services

Environment, Energy, Education & Other:

© 2009 Massachusetts Nonprofit Network
Online versions of our newsletters are released for internet archive a week following email distribution. If you would like to become part of our mailing list, please send your name and email address to Heather Hartshorn, Director of Programs.

Federal Stimulus Act Overview

Federal Stimulus Act and Nonprofits

MNN is committed to supporting and advocating for nonprofits in these difficult times. As a result of a grant from the Boston Foundation, MNN hired a professional legislative firm to assist in tracking where nonprofits are effected by the legislation.

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 provides a foundation for future economic growth in key areas such as health care, clean energy, education, and infrastructure. In Massachusetts, many of the initiatives directly affect the nonprofit sector. Listed below are resources pertaining to the Commonwealth’s stimulus.

Nonprofit Capacity Building Program- closed for this cycle

To find grants you may be eligible for

For more analysis of the legislation go to our federal partners:

To track what is happening in the Recovery Act go to Recovery.gov