Massachusetts Nonprofits Feeling Strained by COVID-19 Outbreak

Today, the Massachusetts Nonprofit Network (MNN) and Philanthropy Massachusetts released findings from their survey of nonprofit organizations on the anticipated and real impacts of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak in the state’s nonprofit sector.

The results from the survey—which received over 950 responses from nonprofits of all sizes, fields, and from all regions of the state—underscored the enormity of the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on nonprofits’ essential operations, programs, and services. Full results of the survey can be found here.

63% of nonprofit respondents indicated that they were experiencing, or anticipated, a loss in their annual revenues. In addition, 52% of respondents characterized the severity of impacts related to the COVID-19 outbreak as “high” (defined as “significant disruptions”) and 43% characterized the severity as “moderate” (defined as “minor disruptions”).

“The results from the poll reinforce what many nonprofits have been sharing with us in recent days: they are already feeling strained by the coronavirus as employers, conveners, and service providers—and it’s only just beginning,” said Jim Klocke, CEO of MNN, and Jeff Poulos, CEO of Philanthropy Massachusetts in a joint statement.

Nonprofits indicated a range of specific impacts to their organizations. 89% of respondents reported the cancellations of programs or events, 67% reported disruptions of services to clients and communities, and 60% reported anticipated budgetary implications related to strains on the economy. Additional impacts on nonprofits included increased and sustained staff and volunteer absences (28%) and increased demand for services from clients and communities (25%).

Additionally, nonprofits responded that they are working to respond, or anticipated responding to the COVID-19 outbreak in the following ways: rescheduling or canceling programs or events (e.g. fundraisers) (92%), staying informed via news and updates from government agencies such as the Centers for Disease Control (91%), encouraging proper hygiene and cleaning procedures (89%), and encouraging sick employees to stay home (87%). 

Finally, nonprofits responded that they need financial relief, more information and best practices, and remote work/work from home support to weather the crisis.

Between the survey’s opening last Wednesday and its close yesterday, many nonprofits have closed offices, instituted work-from-home policies, or paused operations altogether. “In the time period when responses were being collected, employer behaviors and practices were rapidly changing in response to new information being released. It is likely that the impacts of the COVID-19 outbreak on nonprofits are now even higher than what was reported in the poll,” said Klocke and Poulos.

Klocke and Poulos reaffirmed their organizations’ commitment to working with nonprofit, philanthropic, and government leaders to mitigate the impacts of the COVID-19 outbreak on the Massachusetts nonprofit sector. 

“We look forward to a collaborative, cross-sector approach that mitigates the impacts of COVID-19 on nonprofits and the communities they serve,” said Klocke and Poulos. “Nonprofits are essential to the immediate responses to the COVID-19 outbreak, and will play outsized roles in rebuilding our communities in the long term.”

Nonprofits’ Response to COVID-19, and Policy Remedies

As first responders, service providers, and employers, nonprofits are contributing to and impacted by the coronavirus response efforts in a number of ways. Federal and state governments are in the process of developing policy remedies to address immediate needs and determine longer-term recovery needs. MNN is in communication with public officials to coordinate a cross-sector approach, and ensure that nonprofits are included in government mitigation and relief efforts. Specifically, MNN is working to ensure that any forthcoming policy remedies acknowledge the following:

Nonprofits are significant employers in the Commonwealth. 

  • Any employer-focused relief should make sure that tax credits and deductions are applicable to the taxes nonprofits pay, such as unrelated business income taxes and payroll taxes. 
  • Unemployment insurance measures should consider the fact that a number of nonprofit employees work at organizations that self-insure, and look to remedies that relieve the unanticipated burden on self-insured organizations. 

Nonprofits are front-line service providers and economic generators in their communities.

  • Direct-service organizations that shifted operations to respond to the crisis should be included in any public recovery funds.  
  • Economic stimulus proposals targeted at adversely affected industries should recognize the impact of the coronavirus on the broad array of closed nonprofit services.  

Nonprofits rely heavily on donations and government grants to execute missions.

  • Massachusetts has restored its state charitable deduction at a critical time: when charitable donations are down, and service demands are up. Preserving this incentive is vitally important.
  • Government agencies should adopt policies recognizing that a nonprofit may not fulfill its deliverable on a state contract due to the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition, state grantmaking agencies should consider temporarily loosening government-wide grant and contract reporting, application, and renewal requirements.

MNN will continue to provide updates through our newsletter and main coronavirus page with new developments. Nonprofits with questions or input on policies that would be beneficial to their organizations should contact MNN’s Director of Government Affairs Danielle Fleury.

MNN Applauds Philanthropic and Government Action to Mitigate Coronavirus Impacts

Philanthropies and governments across Massachusetts are setting up funds to support organizations and communities that have been impacted by the coronavirus. The Boston Foundation, the Community Foundation of Western Massachusetts, the United Way of Central Massachusetts, and the United Way of Greater New Bedford, and the United Way of Massachusetts Bay and Merrimack Valley have announced rapid-response funds.

In addition, the City of Boston is expected to announce today a fund to support families hardest hit by the crisis.

Links to these funds can be found at MNN’s coronavirus webpage here.

MNN released this statement today from CEO Jim Klocke:

“MNN thanks the government, philanthropic and community leaders across Massachusetts who are working to mitigate the impacts of the coronavirus on nonprofits and the communities they serve.

The coronavirus has obvious impacts on nonprofits’ abilities and capacities to carry out their important missions. MNN has heard from many nonprofits about the anticipated and real impacts on their daily operations. Some of the anticipated and real impacts on nonprofits include widespread cancellations of programs and events and the corresponding loss of revenue, disruptions of service to clients and communities, workforce-related matters like employee paid leave and unemployment insurance, and budgetary implications related to strains on the economy.

This year, nonprofits will need unrestricted dollars more than ever. Charitable donations, in particular gifts from individuals, have always been the most important part of nonprofits’ unrestricted budgets which allows them to maneuver with some flexibility in times like these and keep their operations afloat.

We are committed to working with our partners to help everyone in Massachusetts—particularly nonprofits and the communities they serve—weather the crisis.”

Light of Dawnn Awards with Governor Charlie Baker Shine Light on Community Heroes in Memory of Youth Worker

Light of Dawnn 2020-145-min-min

Nonprofit leaders, government officials, and community members came together at the West End House Boys and Girls Club on Tuesday for the sixth annual Light of Dawnn Awards Ceremony to honor the life of Dawnn Ashley Jaffier. Three front-line nonprofit professionals and three high school seniors who embody Dawnn’s legacy were recognized for their service to their communities.

Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker delivered remarks at the ceremony.

“Our administration is grateful for the West End Boys and Girls Club’s dedication to the continued celebration of Dawnn’s life and service,” said Governor Charlie Baker. “Congratulations to this year’s award and scholarship recipients, each of whom exemplify Dawnn’s compassion, leadership, and kindness.”

The Light of Dawnn Awards were created to honor the memory of Dawnn Jaffier, who was killed on August 23, 2014, while on her way to a neighborhood celebration. At 26 years old, Dawnn had made a significant impact in her community through her work at nonprofits, including the West End House, Playworks, City Year, and the Boys and Girls Clubs of Boston.

After Dawnn’s death, her family, friends, and colleagues came together to create the Light of Dawnn Awards to honor Dawnn’s legacy of compassion and service. The Awards aim to raise the public profiles of nonprofit workers doing important direct-service work, particularly those who do not have prominent or externally-facing roles.

Every year, three direct-service nonprofit professionals are selected to receive a Light of Dawnn Award and a $5,000 cash prize. The Awards are presented by the Highland Street Foundation and the Kraft family and managed by the Massachusetts Nonprofit Network.

This year’s awardees are Shantell Jeter, Physical Education Teacher at Boston Green Academy; Aspen Eberhardt, Operations Director at Greater Boston PFLAG; and Isabel Villela, Case Manager at La Alianza Hispana.

“It is an honor to recognize Shantell, Aspen, and Isabel for their outstanding contributions to our community,” said Blake Jordan, Executive Director of the Highland Street Foundation. “Just like Dawnn, these individuals quietly go about their work every day driven by a desire to make a difference in someone’s life.”

“We are pleased to celebrate Dawnn’s spirit and legacy by honoring this year’s outstanding Light of Dawnn Award recipients,” said Jim Ayres, chair of the Massachusetts Nonprofit Network’s board of directors. “Shantell, Aspen, and Isabel are outstanding examples of the hundreds of thousands of nonprofit professionals across Massachusetts that work to make our communities stronger.”

In addition, three high school seniors were awarded the Light of Dawnn Scholarships for their community work. Now in their fifth year, the scholarships were created by John Hancock, where Dawnn’s mother is a longtime employee, and the Foundation To Be Named Later. Scholarships of $5,000 are given to each recipient for higher education.

This year’s scholarship recipients are Aleena Mangham and Lesley Carranza of the West End House Boys and Girls Club and Erika Yamilet Garcia of Beacon Academy.

“We are honored to once again join Dawnn’s family, and our community partners, to pay tribute to her extraordinary life and legacy,” said Tom Crohan, VP & Counsel, Corporate Responsibility and Government Relations, John Hancock. “Aleena, Lesley, and Erika exemplify Dawnn’s commitment to community service, and we hope their awards make the decision to attend college a little easier.”

Heading into 2020: 3 Tax Law Updates that Impact Nonprofits

by Danielle Fleury, Director of Government Affairs

The end of 2019 and beginning of the new year brings changes at the federal and state level that impact nonprofits all across the Commonwealth. Here are three policy updates, summarized below, that nonprofits should be aware of:

Federal updates

  • The nonprofit transportation benefit tax has been repealed.

Strong advocacy from the nonprofit sector resulted in Congress supporting nonprofits in one of their last major actions of 2019. On December 20, 2019, the President signed H.R. 1865–a bipartisan appropriations bill–which included a repeal of the unrelated business income tax (UBIT) on transportation benefits, known as the “nonprofit parking tax.” Federal tax reform in 2017 had created this new 21% tax on certain commuting and parking benefits given to nonprofit employees. This is a retroactive repeal, meaning that nonprofits that had made payments under this new tax will be able to claim refunds. MNN joined state and national partners in calling for a repeal of this burdensome tax, and thanks nonprofits across Massachusetts for sharing their stories of impact and helping to make a strong case for repeal.

  • A change has been made to donors giving through IRA’s.

Since 2017 federal tax reform changed tax incentives for charitable giving, MNN has pointed out several strategies that nonprofits should know about in order to help donors maintain a tax benefit for their donations. One of these strategies–highlighted in the November edition of MassGives –applies to older donors making Qualified Charitable Distributions (QCDs) from their IRAs. The funding bill signed by the President on December 20 increased the age at which individuals must start making required minimum distributions–from 70 ½ to 72. Nonprofits should still promote this method of making tax deductible contributions, but should note the new age limit when discussing required minimum distributions.

State update

  • The state charitable tax deduction is returning.

Taxpayers and nonprofits in Massachusetts are poised to realize a new charitable giving benefit. On January 1, 2020, the state income tax rate in Massachusetts dropped to 5%. This prompts the return of the state charitable tax deduction, which is currently set in state statute to become available to taxpayers for contributions made in 2021 and beyond. While taxpayers are accustomed to writing off charitable contributions when itemizing their federal tax returns, the state charitable deduction will apply to contributions regardless of whether Massachusetts filers itemize or not. This incentive–which originated when Massachusetts voters approved a 2000 ballot initiative–will help offset concerning trends in the decline in individual giving, since federal tax policy altered the federal tax benefit that individuals receive for making charitable contributions.

MNN Statement on State Charitable Tax Deduction: “Individual Contributions are the Lifeblood of the Nonprofit Sector”

Earlier today, the Baker-Polito Administration announced that the state charitable tax deduction will be restored for charitable contributions made in calendar year 2021 and beyond.

MNN released this statement from CEO Jim Klocke on the reinstatement of the state charitable tax deduction:

“The state charitable deduction will provide a much-needed boost to individual charitable giving, which declined in 2018 for the first time in years due to changes in federal tax law. These changes stripped donors of their ability to itemize their charitable contributions on their federal tax returns.”

“Most of the people who give to nonprofits in Massachusetts are middle- and low-income earners. The state deduction will benefit hundreds of thousands of them each year. We need to support and promote charitable giving.”

“Individual contributions are the lifeblood of the nonprofit sector. Individual contributions to nonprofits are three times as great as the funds given by foundations and corporations combined.”

New Commonwealth Insights: The Census is Coming, and Nonprofits Should Prepare Now to Ensure Everyone Counts

Comm Insights 2019 3rd ed social media-minToday, we released the latest edition of Commonwealth Insights, “The Census is Coming: How Nonprofits Can Make Sure That Everyone Counts–and Why They Should.”

The Census is nearly here, and nonprofits around the Commonwealth should prepare now to mobilize their communities in support of a complete count. As trusted messengers, nonprofits can leverage existing assets and take advantage of new ones to raise awareness, help individuals access and complete the Census, and coordinate efforts with partners to maximize collective impact.

This edition of Commonwealth Insights features case studies of three nonprofits–Castle Square Tenants Organization, the Pioneer Valley Planning Commission, and the Chelsea Collaborative–working to ensure that their communities count in 2020. Their work can serve as a guide for other nonprofits.

The report is a practical guide that contains useful tips and resources for nonprofits to drive participation in one of the most foundational, high-stakes activities that communities undertake.

This is the third edition of Commonwealth Insights published in 2019. You can read all past editions of Commonwealth Insights at massnonprofitnet.org/CommonwealthInsights. Please feel free to reach out to us with feedback on this or any Commonwealth Insights issue.

We are grateful for the generous support of our organizational sustainers, the Barr Foundation, the Boston Foundation, and the Highland Street Foundation, which makes reports like Commonwealth Insights possible.

2019 Conference: Nonprofit Leaders Get “Sustenance” to Strengthen Their Work and Communities

2019 Conference thank you email banner-minFRAMINGHAM, MA – On Wednesday, October 16, 2019, over 600 nonprofit and business leaders attended the Massachusetts Nonprofit Network (MNN)’s annual conference, Building A Better Commonwealth. The conference provided 30 workshops and networking to deepen nonprofit leaders’ capacities to build stronger communities, featured a keynote panel discussion focusing on three areas of the statewide sector’s impact, and honored Priscilla Kane Hellweg and Darnell Williams for their storied and influential careers in the nonprofit sector.

“We know that in this line of work, there are often times when your feet are tired, but your soul is rested,” said CEO Jim Klocke in his opening remarks, hearkening back to civil rights icon Mother Pollard. “Our goal today is to give you sustenance so that at the end of each day going forward, your souls may be rested.”

The conference featured a keynote panel discussion moderated by Bob Gittens, Executive Director of Cambridge Family and Children’s Services and Vice Chair of the MNN Board of Directors, with Rachel Heller, CEO of the Citizens’ Housing and Planning Association (CHAPA), Eva Millona, Executive Director of the Massachusetts Immigrant and Refugee Advocacy (MIRA) Coalition, and Jerry Rubin, President and CEO of JVS Boston.

The panelists discussed the theme “building a better Commonwealth” and how their organizations are addressing critical issues throughout the state. The panel focused in particular on the ways that their respective issue areas–combating “cliff effects” and promoting economic mobility (CHAPA), ensuring a complete count in the 2020 Census (MIRA), and preparing the workforce for a 21st century economy (JVS Boston)–impact the nonprofit sector broadly and thus require collaborative approaches.

“The 2020 Census impacts all of us; if we are under-counted, we will all suffer,” said Millona. “Nonprofits need to work together to make sure that doesn’t happen.”

“The issue for many people in this economy is not finding a job–it’s getting a good job that pays well,” said Rubin. “JVS Boston works directly with employers to create these kinds of jobs.”

“We need a culture that calls out what’s wrong in our society, and we need collaboration between organizations to make it right,” added Heller.

MNN also presented the 2019 Lifetime Achievement Awards to Priscilla Kane Hellweg, Executive and Artistic Director of Enchanted Circle Theater, and Darnell Williams, former President and CEO of the Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts.

Priscilla Kane Hellweg, who co-founded Enchanted Circle Theater 39 years ago, was honored for her dedication to providing arts integration education and for inspiring thousands of children and adults across Massachusetts.

“I still feel inspired whenever I see a child using arts integration go from ‘I can’t’ to ‘I can,’” said Kane Hellweg. “It doesn’t get better than that.”

Darnell Williams, who served as President and CEO at the Urban League until September, was honored for his commitment to uplifting communities of color in the Greater Boston area.

In his remarks, Williams implored the nonprofit audience to “keep marching” to the top of the proverbial mountain–and not to leave anyone behind. “We can’t forget to bring the forgotten with us. Reaching the summit happens when we’re all there together,” said Williams.

The conference also featured almost 50 business exhibitors focused on serving nonprofits. Held every year since the organization’s founding in 2007, MNN’s conference is one of the largest events dedicated to building nonprofit capacity in Massachusetts.

Priscilla Kane Hellweg, Darnell Williams to receive Lifetime Achievement Awards

2019 Panelist pic 2 Copy-minBOSTON, MA – The Massachusetts Nonprofit Network (MNN) has announced that Priscilla Kane Hellweg, Executive and Artistic Director of Enchanted Circle Theater of Holyoke, MA, and Darnell Williams, President and CEO of the Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts, will be the recipients of the 2019 Lifetime Achievement Awards.

The awards will be presented at MNN’s annual conference on Wednesday, October 16, at the Sheraton Framingham Hotel and Conference Center.

“We are pleased to honor Priscilla and Darnell for their inspiring careers and for their invaluable contributions to the state’s nonprofit sector,” said Jim Klocke, CEO of MNN. “Their lives of service have made indelible impacts on the lives of people across the Commonwealth.”

“I am incredibly honored to be chosen by the Massachusetts Nonprofit Network for a Lifetime Achievement Award,” said Kane Hellweg. “To be a part of that moment of inspiration when children, youth, and adults feel their own creative potential is beyond inspiring. Thank you for this vote of confidence!”

“My family and I are so humbly honored to receive this recognition for the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Massachusetts Nonprofit Network,” said Williams. “We do this work because of our passion and purpose to help people transform their lives for the better. To have that work highlighted is a sincere blessing.”

Every year, MNN honors outstanding leaders who have made lasting contributions to the Massachusetts nonprofit sector. Past Lifetime Achievement Award winners include Hubie Jones, Carol Duncan, Paul Grogan, Beth Smith, Michael Weekes, Joan Wallace-Benjamin, and Rev. Gloria White-Hammond.

About the Lifetime Achievement Award Winners

Priscilla Kane Hellweg is the Executive and Artistic Director of Enchanted Circle Theater, a nonprofit multi-service arts organization in Holyoke, MA, that integrates arts and education to engage, enhance, and inspire learning. Under Priscilla’s direction, Enchanted Circle has become a regional leader in the field of arts integration. Enchanted Circle works in public school districts across Western Massachusetts and collaborates with over 60 community service partner organizations to develop work that bridges arts, education, and human services to chronically under-served communities, including youth in foster care, families in homeless shelters, and youth in residential treatment programs.

Priscilla earned her Bachelor of Arts from Hampshire College and professional theater training from the Provincetown Playhouse. Priscilla has created district-wide arts integration initiatives to enhance academic achievement for Holyoke, Amherst, Northampton, and Westfield Public Schools, and has collaborated on the development of several Teacher Training Institutes with numerous partners, funded by the National Endowment for the Arts, National Endowment for the Humanities, and Teaching American History grants.

Priscilla received the Champions of Arts Education Award from the Massachusetts Alliance for Arts in Education, and a Millennium Award from the National Guild of Community Arts Educators for her commitment to making quality arts education accessible to all. She was a finalist for MNN’s 2019 Nonprofit Excellence Award in the Leadership category. Priscilla’s manuscript, “Actively Engaged: Theater as a Dynamic Teaching Tool,” is scheduled for publication in 2020 by the University of Massachusetts-Arts Extension Service.

Darnell Williams is the President and CEO of the Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts, a nonprofit that provides services and programs in education, career, and professional development and employment for African-Americans and other residents of color. Under Darnell’s direction, the Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts hosted the National Urban League’s Annual Conference in Boston in 2011 after a 35-year absence, paving the way for additional conferences for people of color to come to Boston.

Darnell earned his Master’s degree in organizational development from Boston University after completing his undergraduate degree at American International College in Springfield, MA. Prior to joining the Urban League, he was Manager of Management Recruitment and Development at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) as well as a Diversity Consultant in private practice. Darnell served as President of the Springfield Branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and as the President of the NAACP New England Area Conference.

Darnell was a contributing member to Boston’s successful effort to win the 2004 Democratic National Convention. For his contributions within the Black community and the City of Boston, Mayor Thomas Menino presented him with the 2003 Community Service Award. Darnell received an Honorary Doctor of Laws from American International College and an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters from Worcester State University.

About the Massachusetts Nonprofit Network

The Massachusetts Nonprofit Network (MNN) brings together nonprofits, funders, business leaders, and elected officials to strengthen nonprofits and raise the sector’s voice on critical issues. The network has more than 700 nonprofit member organizations and more than 100 for-profit affiliate partners. To learn more visit www.massnonprofitnet.org.

PRESS RELEASE: MNN Conference Panel to Address 2020 Census, Cliff Effects, and Workforce Development

2019 Panelist 4 square-min (1)BOSTON, MA – The Massachusetts Nonprofit Network (MNN) announced that a keynote panel featuring top nonprofit leaders will cover the 2020 Census, cliff effects, and workforce development at the organization’s annual conference on October 16, 2019, at the Sheraton Framingham Hotel and Conference Center.

The panel is centered around the conference theme, “Building a Better Commonwealth,” which captures a common aspirations of the Massachusetts nonprofit sector.

The conference’s keynote panelists will be Rachel Heller, CEO of the Citizens’ Housing and Planning Association (CHAPA); Eva Millona, Executive Director of the Massachusetts Immigrant and Refugee Advocacy (MIRA) Coalition; and Jerry Rubin, President and CEO of JVS.

The featured topics of the panel represent pressing issues at the forefront of nonprofit work. Nonprofits are playing a critical role in ensuring that hard-to-count communities participate in the 2020 Census. The “cliff effects” phenomenon, in which an increase in work earnings results in a sharp reduction or loss of public benefits, impacts many people that nonprofits serve. And as the state’s nonprofit sector faces a wave of retirements from senior-level positions, innovative workforce development strategies will be needed to develop the next generation of nonprofit leaders.

“We are excited to have Rachel, Eva, and Jerry on our conference keynote panel this year,” said Jim Klocke, CEO of MNN. “Their organizations do great work, and we can all learn from them.”

MNN holds its annual conference every year for nonprofit organizations across Massachusetts. The conference, drawing over 600 attendees annually from Massachusetts nonprofits and for-profit companies that serve nonprofits, is one of the largest gatherings for nonprofit professionals held in the Commonwealth.

About the Panelists

Rachel Heller is the CEO of Citizens’ Housing and Planning Association (CHAPA), an organization that encourages the production and preservation of affordable housing to low and moderate income families and individuals and fosters diverse and sustainable communities through planning and community development. Heller will bring to the panel expertise on solutions to combat “cliff effects,” a phenomenon experienced when an increase in work earnings results in a sharp reduction or loss of food, housing, childcare, and other public benefits. She previously worked as the Director of Public Policy at the Alliance for Business Leadership, served as Chief of Staff to Massachusetts State Senator Susan Tucker, and was the Senior Policy Advocate at Homes for Families, a nonprofit advocacy organization working to end family homelessness.

Eva Millona is the Executive Director of the Massachusetts Immigrant and Refugee Advocacy (MIRA) Coalition, the state’s largest organization representing the foreign born, and co-chair of the National Partnership for New Americans, the lead national organization focusing on immigrant integration. Millona is the chairperson of the 2020 Complete Count Committee, formed by Secretary of the Commonwealth Bill Galvin to provide education and lead community outreach around the decennial census. She will bring to the panel insights on how to encourage census participation in diverse communities. Millona is also the co-chair of the Governor’s Advisory Council for Refugees and Immigrants and serves on the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. She serves on the Advisory Board for the Mayor’s Office for Immigrant Advancement and serves on the Attorney General’s Council for New Americans. She is a frequent speaker on immigrant integration in national and international stages.

Jerry Rubin is President and CEO of JVS, an organization that empowers individuals from diverse communities to find employment and build careers and partners with employers to hire, develop, and retain productive workforces. Rubin has overseen the adoption of innovative strategies including the nation’s first Pay for Success project to focus exclusively on adult education and workforce development for low-skilled adults. Prior to JVS, Rubin founded and was Executive Director of two nonprofit organizations: the Greater Boston Manufacturing Partnership, a training and consulting organization, and the Coalition For a Better Acre, a community development corporation based in Lowell, Massachusetts. Rubin also spent ten years in the administration of Boston Mayor Raymond L. Flynn, leading several housing, economic development and workforce development initiatives. He is the author of numerous book chapters, articles, and monographs on housing, economic development, and workforce development issues.

About the Massachusetts Nonprofit Network

The Massachusetts Nonprofit Network (MNN) brings together nonprofits, funders, business leaders, and elected officials to strengthen nonprofits and raise the sector’s voice on critical issues. The network has more than 700 nonprofit member organizations and more than 100 for-profit affiliate partners. To learn more visit www.massnonprofitnet.org.

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