Federal Stimulus Act–Newsletter5

Stimulus and Nonprofits, Vol. 5 – MNN’s ARRA Newsletter – June 11, 2009

Dear Nonprofit Leader,

This email contains a few updates from the Vol. 5 your recieved last night.  I hope that you made good use of MNN’s  ARRA Newsletter, Volumes 1 and 2, 3 and 4. Today we present Volume 5 of our research on the opportunities for nonprofits to participate in the economic recovery of our country. Please let us know if is useful and how it can be made more so and please share it.

Again, thank you to The Boston Foundation for generously providing financial support for this needed  project.

Dave Magnani,
Executive Director, 617-330-1188

To view Stimulus and Nonprofits, Volume 1, 2, 3 and 4 or for more information on the Massachusetts Nonprofit Network, please visit our website.

If this edition has been forwarded to you and you would like to receive future volumes please email us your name and organization.

Not a member? Please consider joining to sustain this and other programs.

Where we are right now.

In the past couple of weeks, Massachusetts has seen few increases in the allocation of its American Recovery and Reinvestment Act allotment. To date, $2.92 billion of the scheduled $8.7 billion has been dispersed to Massachusetts (approximately 33%), a figure that has not changed since our last update. Despite the slow pace of funding distribution since ARRA’s enactment a few months ago, it is expected that this pace will increase dramatically in the coming weeks.

On June 8th, 2009 President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden announced “Roadmap to Recovery,” a plan designed to rapidly accelerate ARRA’s implementation. While a purported  150,000 jobs have been “created or saved” in the first 100 days since ARRA’s passage, the White House hopes to quadruple that figure in the next one hundred days, indicating that funds will be released quickly. Saying he’s not satisfied with the progress, Obama delivered a set of marching orders to his Cabinet: cut red tape and ramp up hundreds of public works and other projects designed to stabilize the economy and reduce unemployment. Currently, $135 billion of the $787 billion or 17% of the recovery funds have been secured or spent, but the administration has set a goal of 70% to be expended by the summer of 2010. It is expected that this acceleration of funding will effect direct federal stimulus funding on infrastructure projects in the pipeline, direct federal formula grant funding such as money for summer jobs as well as competitive grants for the state and individual entities (including nonprofits) in Massachusetts.

Due to the fact that a substantial majority of ARRA funding is being delivered directly to Massachusetts and its municipalities through pre-existing relationships, it is crucial that nonprofit organizations cultivate relationships with government entities. Only through these partnerships can the most be made of ARRA’s opportunities, as many grants have rigid guidelines and requirements that must be met.

Newsletter volume 5 includes newly released information on deadlines and specific requirements of many of the federal grant opportunities previously referenced in past newsletters. However, because we seek to provide new and relevant information, categories without new announcements or information have not been included. We suggest that you refer back to previous newsletters in order to have a comprehensive understanding of all the funding available in your category of interest.

If there is information that is not contained in this or previous newsletters which you would like us to know and/or to transmit to others, please email us at info@massnonprofitnet.org.

Reminder of Upcoming ARRA Deadlines

Please find below the upcoming deadlines for funding opportunities:

  • June 15th, 2009 – Deadline for Enabling National Networking of Scientists and Resource Discovery Grants
  • June 15th, 2009 – HUD will start accepting applications for funding requests to green retrofit multi-family housing that is already HUD-assisted
  • June 25th, 2009 – Deadline for Energy Efficiency and Conservation competitive grant program
  • June 25th, 2009 – Letter of Intent outlining the proposed project due for NIST Research Construction Grants
  • June 26th, 2009 – Deadline for Community Services Block Grant Training and Technical Assistance Program
  • June 26th, 2009 – Deadline for Notice of Intent to Apply for Teacher Quality Partnership (TQP) Grants Program
  • June 30th, 2009 – Deadline for NCMHD Community Participation in Health Disparities Intervention Research Planning
  • July 1st, 2009 – Deadline for NCMHD Exploratory Centers of Excellence Grants
  • July 2nd, 2009 – Deadline for National Service Training and Technical Assistance
  • July 7th, 2009 – Deadline for the Strengthening Communities Fund applications
  • July 13th, 2009 – Applications due for NIST Recovery Act Measurement Science and Engineering Research Grants Program: Providing the Technology Infrastructure to Address National Priorities.
  • July 17th, 2009 – Applications due for Federal Neighborhood Stabilization Program 2 (NSP2)
  • July 22nd, 2009 – Applications due for Regional Sequestration Technology Training Grants
  • July 27th, 2009 – Deadline for Measurement Science and Engineering Fellowship Program applications
  • July 29th, 2009 – Deadline for Wind Energy Consortia Grants between Institutions of Higher Learning and Industry
  • August 4th, 2009 – Applications due for The Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE)
  • August 10th, 2009 – Full proposals due for NIST Research Construction Grants
  • Sept. 1st, 2009 – Applications due for round 2 of the Federal Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP).
  • Sept. 1st, 2009 – Deadline for competitive grant applications to buy and rehabilitate foreclosed properties and other projects to stabilize neighborhoods and create affordable housing
  • Sept. 17th, 2009 – Deadline for Core Facility Renovation, Repair and Improvements Grants
  • Sept. 24th, 2009 – Deadline for Academic Research Enhancement Awards
  • Sept. 30th, 2009 – Deadline for Habitat Restoration in Coastal Areas Competitive Grant
  • June 30th, 2010 – Deadline for EDA Economic Recovery Program applications
  • June 31st, 2010 – Applications will be accepted on a rolling basis up until this date for Boston’s Neighborhood Stabilization Program funds Deadline for Capital Improvement Program (CIP) for   Community Health Centers

Strengthening Nonprofits

Competitive Grants

National Service Training and Technical Assistance
The Corporation for National and Community Service has announced the availability of approximately $8 million in funds to support national providers of training and technical assistance for community service programs that use service and volunteering to meet community needs.

The Corporation will award cooperative agreements in five categories to organizations with the capacity and demonstrated expertise to deliver training and technical assistance in one or more of the categories. Organizations may include grantees and potential grantees, sub-grantees, sponsoring organizations and projects, and participants and members in programs administered by the Corporation including AmeriCorps, VISTA, National Civilian Community Corps (NCCC), RSVP, Foster Grandparents, Senior Companions, and Learn and Serve America and in support of other special initiatives of the Corporation.

Among other provisions of the recently passed Edward M. Kennedy Serve America Act the law, is the reauthorization and expansion of the Senior Corps, AmeriCorps, and Learn and Serve America programs. The new law also puts AmeriCorps on a path to grow from 75,000 to 250,000 positions by 201 and increases opportunities for students and older Americans to serve.

The legislation is likely to affect the scope and nature of the cooperative agreements that will result from this competition. The Corporation is particularly interested in “new approaches and cutting edge technologies that will creatively support new initiatives and cost-effectively support expansion of national service and the non-profit sector.” Organizations selected through this competition will work with and support current and future training and technical assistance provider organizations. Providers use their technical expertise and/or capacity to deliver services primarily through web-based and other distance learning approaches and through targeted face to face training.

The 5 categories are: Technology/Knowledge Management including Specialized Service Learning Services (Approximately $2.5 million for year one, including at least $750,000 for specialized service-learning services); Training Support (Approximately $3.5 million for year one); Training and Technical Assistance to AmeriCorps State*National Programs (Approximately $ 1 million for year one); Effective Practices in Disability and Inclusion Services (Approximately $1 million for year one); and Return on Investment for Managing Volunteers. (Approximately $100,000 for year one).

The grant competition is open to state and local government entities, non-profit organizations, including faith- and community-based organizations, higher education institutions,and commercial entities. Organizations that operate or intend to operate Corporation supported programs are also eligible to apply.

The deadline for eGrants submissions is 5:00 p.m. Eastern Time on July 2, 2009. For more info click here.

Health and Human Services

Recently released activity reports from the United States Department of Health and Human Services are allowing us to see more clearly what funds are being made available to Massachusetts, how they will be dispersed amongst different programs, and how much has already been delivered.  Currently the State is set to receive more than $1.3 billion in Federal HHS funding which will be divided into twenty-nine different programs. The vast majority of the HHS funds, in dollar amounts, are devoted to Medicaid (more about Medicaid under the Recovery Act below), while other significant portions include money for: child care, family services, infectious disease, and  health research and resources.  To date, 56% or $748 million of Massachusetts’ funds have been paid out, although this money has gone almost exclusively to Medicaid (99.6%).  See the chart below for a complete breakdown of funding allocated to Massachusetts from HHS.

HHS American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Massachusetts Expenditures for Week of June 5, 2009
Agency / Bureau TAFS Award Type Total Obligations Total Gross Outlays
Department of Health and Human Services: Health Resources and Services Administration Health Resources and Services, Recovery Act Discretionary Grant $9,918,594 $596,768
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health National Library of Medicine Discretionary Grant $1,594,006 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health John E. Fogarty International center Discretionary Grant $131,760 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health NationalInstitute ofChild Health and Human Development Discretionary Grant $242,833 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health National Institute on Aging Discretionary Grant $208,485 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health Office of the Director, Recovery Act Discretionary Grant $1,166,582 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health NationalCenterfor Research Resources, Recovery Act Discretionary Grant $9,397,663 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute Discretionary Grant $2,784,802 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health NationalInstitute ofGeneral Medical Sciences Discretionary Grant $540,705 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Discretionary Grant $88,000 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Discretionary Grant $6,268,605 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Cooperative Agreements $92,211 $5,000
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Discretionary Grant $1,299,998 $45,000
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health NationalInstitute ofDiabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Discretionary Grant $912,860 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health National Institute of Bioimaging & Bioengineering Discretionary Grant $761,135 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health NationalInstitute ofAllergy and Infectious Diseases Discretionary Grant $9,392,100 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Discretionary Grant $2,876,601 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health National Eye Institute Discretionary Grant $1,769,162 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders Discretionary Grant $44,344 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health National Institute of Mental Health Discretionary Grant $668,321 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health National Institute on Drug Abuse Discretionary Grant $1,492,691 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Discretionary Grant $209,700 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Health NationalCenterfor Complementary and Alternative Medicine Discretionary Grant $1,200,061 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Grants to States for Medicaid, Recovery Act Entitlements $1,227,300,179 $745,102,457
Department of Health and Human Services: Administration for Children and Families Payments to States for Child Support Enforcement and Family Supp Entitlements $1,868,993 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: Administration for Children and Families Payments to States for the Child Care and Development Block Gran Formula and Block Grant $23,971,658 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: Administration for Children and Families Children and Families Services Programs, Recovery Act Formula and Block Grant $24,922,586 $0
Department of Health and Human Services: Administration for Children and Families Payment to States for Foster Care and Adoption Assistance, Recov Entitlements $4,731,405 $2,695,181
Department of Health and Human Services: Administration on Aging Aging Services Programs, Recovery Act Formula and Block Grant $506,640 $0
TOTAL $1,336,362,680 $748,444,406

Medicaid
HHS reported that as of May 29th cumulative ARRAMedicaidFMAPState draw downs total $18.6 billion (out of a total $87 billion). The Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) at HHS calculates the temporary FMAP increases quarterly. ASPE then provides these FMAPs to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, which uses them to determine the amount of Federal funds to award to States through the Medicaid grant process. For the first two quarters of FY 2009, ASPE identified the FMAP “hold harmless” figure (the higher of the published FMAPs for FYs 2008 and 2009 for each State), added an across-the-board increase of 6.2 percentage points, and then calculated additional relief based on increases in States’ average monthly unemployment rates.  The present unemployment rate in Massachusetts as of April was 8%, a 0.3% increase from the previous month, and a 3.2% increase from one year ago. Massachusetts currently ranks 28th in the nation for unemployment.
HHS is continuing to review spending plans and could announce and/or begin releasing funds for additional ARRA programs. Moreover, as of May 29th, there were 16 open ARRA  funding opportunity announcements on Grants.gov, totaling about $1.7 billion.

HHS reminds grantees that as a condition of receipt of funds, contractors that receive awards (or modifications to existing awards) funded, in whole or in part by the Recovery Act, must report information on a quarterly basis including, but not limited to:

    (a) The dollar amount of contractor invoices;
    (b) The supplies delivered and services performed;
    (c) An assessment of the completion status of the work;
    (d) An estimate of the number of jobs created and the number of jobs retained as a result of the Recovery Act funds;
    (e) Names and total compensation of each of the five most highly compensated officers for the calendar year in which the contract is awarded; and
    (f) Specific information on first-tier subcontractors.

State Funding

Increased funding for National Health Service Corp.
During her recent visit to Massachusetts, HHS Secretary Sebelius announced the availability of nearly $200 million from ARRA to support student loan repayments for primary care medical, dental and mental health clinicians who want to work at National Health Service Corps (NHSC) sites. Since its inception nearly 40 years ago, the NHSC has provided scholarships and loan repayments for more than 30,000 doctors, dentists and other health professionals who provide health care in the most geographically isolated and economically distressed regions of the country. The new funds are expected to double the number of Corps clinicians and make 3,300 awards to clinicians that serve in health centers, rural health clinics and other health care facilities that care for uninsured and underserved people.

The National Health Service Corps Loan Repayment Program provides $50,000 (or the outstanding balance of qualifying student loans if it is less than $50,000), tax free, to primary care medical, dental and mental health clinicians in exchange for two years of service at an approved site in a Health Professional Shortage Area. Upon completion of the service commitment, clinicians may be eligible to apply for additional support for extended service.

Qualifying health professionals include:

  • Physician
  • Primary Care Nurse Practitioner
  • Certified Nurse-Midwife
  • Primary Care Physician Assistant
  • Dentist
  • Dental Hygienist
  • Health Service Psychologist
  • Licensed Clinical Social Worker
  • Psychiatric Nurse Specialist
  • Marriage and Family Therapist
  • Licensed Professional Counselor

You can apply if you are already working at an approved site or seeking employment at a site that is either approved or meets site eligibility requirements and plans to become approved. Many types of health care facilities are approved NHSC sites. To see a list of opportunities available by state, go here.

Those interested in applying for loan repayments should visit this site.

Independent Living Recovery Funds
ARRA appropriates significant $140 million in new funding for the Independent Living (IL) programs authorized under Title VII of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. The IL programs support services to individuals with significant disabilities and older individuals who are blind to maximize their leadership, empowerment, independence, and productivity, and to promote the integration and full inclusion of individuals with disabilities into the mainstream of American society. In Massachusetts, Independent Living Centers (ILCs) are private, nonprofit, consumer-controlled, community-based organizations providing services and advocacy by and for persons with all types of disabilities. Their goal is twofold; to create opportunities to promote independence and to assist individuals with disabilities to achieve their maximum level of independent functioning within their families and/or communities.

The ARRA funds provide an unprecedented opportunity to implement innovative strategies to improve and expand IL services for individuals with significant disabilities and older individuals who are blind. Under the ARRA, the funds are provided under three authorities:

  • StateIL Services Program (State IL Grants): $18,200,000. Massachusetts will receive an additional $286,391 of this funding.
  • IL Services for Older Individuals Who Are Blind Program (OIB): $34,300,000. Massachusetts will receive $778,450 of this funding.
  • Centers for Independent Living Program (CIL): $87,500,000. Massachusetts CIL will receive $1,813,351 of this funding.

DOE awarded the ARRA funds available under the State IL Grants and OIB programs on April 1, 2009. These awards are in addition to the regular FY 2009 awards for these programs, and together, these awards will constitute a state’s total FY 2009 allocation for the State IL Grants and OIB programs. States are eligible to receive ARRA funds under these programs based on their approved State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) and OIB applications and the provision of the certification required by section 1607 of the ARRA. The assurances in a state’s SPIL and OIB application, as well as the requirements of the ARRA, will apply to the use of ARRA funds.

Information about each State’s formula allocation under the State IL Grants and OIB programs is available here. This website also provides information about the State Fiscal Stabilization Fund (SFSF) under the ARRA, which is different than IL funding.

Local/Municipalities

Community Health Centers Breakdown of IDS Formula Grants
Below is a list of all the Increased Demand for Services funding for each of the community health centers in Massachusetts.

It is our understanding that many community health centers in Massachusetts have also applied for one-time competitive Capital Improvement Program (CIP) grants to be made available from a pool of $850 million to support a 2-year project/budget period.  The due date for submission of CIP grant proposals was June 2, 2009.

County Grantee Program Amount
Barnstable Community Health Center of Cape Cod Inc. ARRA Increased Demand for Services $145,410.00
Duffy Health Center Inc. Increased Demand for Services $128,237.00
Outer Cape Health Services Inc. Increased Demand for Services $197,295.00
Berkshire Greater New Bedford Community Health Center Increased Demand for Services $336,507.00
Healthfirst Family Care Center Increased Demand for Services $207,831.00
Essex Greater Lawrence Family Health Center Inc. Increased Demand for Services $393,755.00
Lynn Community Health Center Inc. Increased Demand for Services $393,331.00
North Shore Community Health Inc. New Access Points $1,300,000.00
North Shore Community Health Inc. Increased Demand for Services $196,615.00
Franklin Community Health Center of Franklin County Increased Demand for Services $169,793.00
Hampden County Caring Health Center Increased Demand for Services $195,379.00
City of Springfield, MA Increased Demand for Services $144,811.00
Holyoke Health Center Inc. Increased Demand for Services $293,281.00
Hampshire Hilltown Community Health Center Inc. Increased Demand for Services $167,990.00
Middlesex Lowell Community Health Center Increased Demand for Services $274,972.00
Norfolk Manet Community Health Center Inc Increased Demand for Services $203,851.00
Plymouth Brockton Neighborhood Health Center Increased Demand for Services $303,248.00
Suffolk Boston Healthcare for the Homeless Inc. Increased Demand for Services $238,888.00
Codman Square Health Center Increased Demand for Services $100,000.00
Dorchester House Multi-Service Center Increased Demand for Services $100,000.00
East Boston Neighborhood Health Center Increased Demand for Services $663,663.00
Fenway Community Health Center Increased Demand for Services $185,065.00
Harbor Health Seervices Increased Demand for Services $332,826.00
Joseph M. Smith Community Health Center Increased Demand for Services $288,216.00
MA League of Community Health Centers Increased Demand for Services $134,935.00
Mattapan Community Health Center Increased Demand for Services $170,204.00
New England Hospital DBA Dimock CHC Increased Demand for Services $208,607.00
North End Community Health Committee Inc. Increased Demand for Services $175,159.00
Roxbury Comprehensive Community Health Center Increased Demand for Services $171,689.00
South Boston Community Health Center Increased Demand for Services $209,678.00
South Cove Community Health Center Inc. Increased Demand for Services $295,522.00
Whittier Street Health Committee Increased Demand for Services $232,253.00
Worcester Community Health Connections Inc. Increased Demand for Services $298,757.00
Community Healthlink Inc. Increased Demand for Services $126,381.00
Family Health Center of Worcester Inc. Increased Demand for Services $334,022.00
Great Brook Valley Health Center Increased Demand for Services $416,643.00
Total $9,734,814.00

Labor and Workforce Development

Municipalities/Localities

On May 27th,   Secretary Bump announced all regional allocations of the $67 million dollars in statewide job training and support services announced by Governor Patrick in April.  These figures are not dissimilar from what we have previously reported and reflect the announcements made by the Secretary over the last few weeks as they have visited various regions around of the state.

ARRA funding will go to the different workforce investment boards and will assist all of the 37 One-Stop Career Centers in Massachusetts. for the one-stop career centers across the state. The board and the centers serve both employers and job-seekers in communities across the state. These resources are a portion of the $67 million recently announced statewide, and will assist all of the 37 One-Stop Career Centers throughout Massachusetts.

It is understood that, although they provide a variety of services, One Stop Career Centers will prioritize job training for dislocated workers and help asses the needs, skills and options of the unemployed. This funding will also be used for literacy training, assistance with GED completion, and help with improving English proficiency.

As referenced in earlier newsletters, ARRA funding provides $21.2 million to serve dislocated workers and more than $10 million to help low-income adults find work. Dislocated worker funds support statewide programming for unemployed workers as well as programming in the Commonwealth’s 16 workforce regions.

Similarly, as we reported in previous newsletters the Governor plans to combine $6.67 million from the state’s YouthWorks summer jobs program with $3.1 million in public safety funds and $21.1 million for youth employment and educational programming provided under the federal recovery bill for a total of $30 million in funding for summer employment and additional services. He estimates that this money will support an estimated 10,000 low-income young people between the ages of 14-24.

Below are the regional allocations for the state’s 16 Workforce Investment Boards. To view the regional press releases, click on an individual board.

Workforce Investment Board ARRA Allocation
Berkshire County Regional Employment Board $1,021,851
Boston Private Industry Council $4,912,876
Bristol Regional Employment Board $4,618,204
Brockton Workforce Investment Board $2,153,268
Cape and Islands Workforce Investment Board $1,936,497
Central MA Workforce Investment Board $4,360,656
Franklin/Hampshire Regional Employment Board $1,790,367
Greater Lowell Workforce Investment Board $2,131,923
Greater New Bedford Workforce Investment Board $3,175,552
Hampden County Regional Employment Board $5,141,066
Merrimack Workforce Investment Board $3,427,935
Metro North Workforce Investment Board $3,618,757
Metro South/West Workforce Investment Board $2,559,938
North Central Workforce Investment Board $2,429,091
North Shore Workforce Investment Board $2,595,445
South Coastal Workforce Investment Board $2,954,628

Competitive Grants

As mentioned in past newsletters, ARRA includes $750 million for competitive grants for worker training and placement in high growth and emerging industry sectors. Within this amount, $500 million is designated for worker training in energy efficiency and renewable energy industries as described in the Green Jobs Act of 2007. Up till now, there has been no specific guidance on what how these funds will be spent.

However, on June 1st, the Employment and Training Administration (ETA) of the Department of Labor announced that it was currently formulating a series of grant competitions for these funds and provided more specifics on how they will be awarded. Although no grant applications have been announced we hope that this fairly detailed information will help guide Massachusetts nonprofits interested in applying for these funds when they are announced by the end of this month.

ETA intends for these funds to be used “to assist individuals impacted by the recession by providing training and placement into employment, including the transition of auto and auto-related workers to jobs in the green energy sector.” These funds are intended to support the training needs of workers and employers in high growth and emerging industries. The grants are also intended to offer an opportunity to demonstrate how partnerships between the public workforce system and other public and private systems, including labor-management partnerships, education institutions, community a faith based organizations, and research institutions can meet the workforce needs of the energy efficiency and renewable energy sectors and other industry sectors.

ETA describes successful organizations and partnerships as those that “ensure that supportive services are integrated with education and training programs so that individuals can have access to a comprehensive array of supportive options that will them in entering career pathways leading to economic self sufficiency.”

Overview of Potential Funding Opportunities

In order to implement this strategic vision, ETA is tentatively planning to issue a series of Solicitations for Grant Applications (SGAs). An overview of the potential solicitations anticipated for funding is provided below. Please be advised that the final funding opportunities may vary from those described.

A. State Labor Market Information Improvement Grants: This will be a competition among State Workforce Agencies (SWAs) or consortia of the SWAs of multiple States to collect, analyze, and disseminate labor market information, as wells as develop a labor exchange infrastructure to direct individuals to careers in the energy efficiency and renewable energy sectors. The activities conducted by successful applicants will be coordinated with and complement work conducted by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. ETA strongly encourages states to form consortia and jointly apply for these grants, and the SGA will reflect a preference for such approaches. Grantees will track workforce trends resulting directly or indirectly from Recovery Act investments, as well as related state, local, or private sector investments that create jobs in energy efficiency and renewable energy sectors after they finish training. This means identifying the existing and emerging needs of employers in these emerging industries, in terms of both skills and job openings, and making available employee placement tools to help match workers with those jobs.

B. Energy Training Partnership Grants: Two separate applicant pools will compete for grants under this solicitation: (1) eligible national labor-management organizations with    local networks; and (2) statewide or local strategic nonprofit partnerships consisting of labor-management organizations, labor, business, Workforces Investment Boards (WIBs), and other organizations. These grantees will deliver training that leads to employment in career in energy efficiency and renewable energy sectors. Grantees will utilize partnerships to design and distribute training approaches that lead to portable industry credentials and employment, including registered apprenticeship. These grants will focus on dislocated and incumbent workers. A portion of the funds under this SGA will be reserved for communities or regions undergoing auto industry related restructuring as discussed below.

C. Pathways Out of Poverty Grants: Two separate applicant pools will compete for grants under this solicitation: (1) eligible national community-based and faith-based organizations with local networks; and (2) local partnerships that include community-based organizations, education and training institutions, businesses, and labor organizations. Successful applicants will provide training and placement services to individuals seeking pathways out of poverty and into employment within energy efficient and renewable energy sectors. Targeted populations include low-income and under-skilled workers, unemployed youth and adults, high school dropouts, or other underserved populations, with priority given to areas of high poverty. Successful training programs for these populations will: (1) include sound recruitment and referral strategies for targeted populations; (2) integrate basic skills and work-readiness training with occupational skills training; (3) combine supportive services with training services to help participants overcome barriers to employment; and (4) provide services at times and locations that are easily accessible.

D. State Sector Training Grants: This will be a competition among SWIBs in partnership with their SWA, local WIBs and One Stop Career Center Systems, or regional consortia of Boards. Grant funds awarded under this SGA will be used to provide training and job placement activities aligned with a workforce sector strategy that will target energy efficiency and renewable energy sectors. The strategy will reflect state energy policies and how they impact the work of the local Workforce Investment system and One Stop Career Centers. Successful applicants will demonstrate: (1) strong partnerships to develop the energy efficiency and renewable energy workforce; (2) relationships with other state agencies receiving recovery Act funding to support strategic planning and implementation efforts; and (3) ability to implement a workforce development approach that targets the needs of a specific industry sector and provides an integrated system of education, training, and supportive services. A portion of the funds under this SGA will be reserves for communities or regions undergoing auto industry related restructuring as discussed below.

E. Green Capacity Building Grants: This will be a competition to build the capacity of current DOL grantees to prepare targeted populations for employment in the energy efficiency and renewable energy sectors. These awards will support organizations as they update existing training and job placement programs for the emerging green economy in order to facilitate the success of other projects under the Green Jobs Initiative. Key activities will include the purchase of equipment, staff professional development, curriculum development, and/or adaptation, partnership development, and where necessary, the hiring of additional staff.

As mentioned above, a portion of the funding under the Energy Training Partnership Grants and the State Sector Training Grants will be reserved to facilitate the transition of auto and auto-related workers to the green/energy efficient workforce. Grants will provide job training, counseling, and placement services to residents from auto communities of incumbent and dislocated workers affected by significant automotive-related restructuring. To qualify for these grants, the geographic area proposed to be served by the project must have within it at least one motor vehicle manufacturer or automotive part supplier and have experienced significant dislocation. Prospective grantees may also propose to serve workers from the area facilities who reside outside the defined area.

ETA anticipates that Solicitations for Grant Applications will be published in June 2009, with application closing dates starting late summer. SGA will be posted on www.grants.gov. Please click here for more details on this potential funding source.

Clean Energy and Environment

State News

Pathways Out of Poverty
On May 28th, Massachusetts announced “Pathways out of Poverty” Green Collar Job Training Grants. These five grants, totaling $1 million were distributed to help low and moderate-income workers obtain training in the growing clean energy sector. The grants were distributed to the following organizations:

  • JYFNetWorks in Boston (serving the Lowell area)
  • Quinsigamond Community College in Worcester
  • Regional Employment Board of Hampden County, Inc. in Springfield
  • Massasoit Community College in Brockton
  • Berkshire Community College in Pittsfield

These funds are intended for use by these organizations to partner with local clean energy companies, education institutions and community organizations so that they may better serve their targeted area. With this funding there may be opportunities for local non-profits and community organizations to partner with the grant recipients to further the goal of job training and placement. Please click here for more information.

Clean Vehicle Funding
The Patrick administration is currently seeking $6.5 million from the federal government for clean vehicle funding. If awarded, this funding would be distributed to both public and private entities for the purpose of purchasing new hybrid vehicles. The Clean Cities fund would pay for the cost disparity between a hybrid vehicle and their conventionally fueled counterparts. These funds could hypothetically be available by late summer. Please click here for more details.

Federal Funding

President Obama announced on May 27th over $467 million from the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act to fund Geothermal and Solar Energy projects. This funding, focused on investing in the clean energy sector is mostly being distributed through competitive grants and government allocations. More information can be seen here and a list of funding opportunities from the DOE can be seen here.

Energy Efficiency Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) Program
Previously mentioned in earlier newsletters, the Energy Efficiency Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) Program is available to State and local governments. However, the application due dates have changed. As of May 11th, the due date for all applicants (States and municipalities) is now June 25th, 2009 not May 25th, 2009, giving more time to state and local governments to apply for their block grants. While only state and local governments may apply for these block grants, there is opportunity for a variety of nonprofits to sub-contract or partner with governmental agencies in accomplishing the specific goals of the grant. Please see below for the breakdown of block grants by state and municipalities.

These formula grants are to be allocated in two ways: at the state level and at the city and counties level. Massachusetts communities with over 35,000 residents are eligible to apply for direct funding from the US Department of Energy (DOE). Those communities will receive a predetermined amount of funding based on the formula grants. Please see the table below. As a state, Massachusetts may also apply for direct funding from the US DOE. In addition, Massachusetts is eligible to receive, as a state, up to $14.7 million in funding. However, at least 60% of this funding (about $8.8 million) must be sub-granted to communities in Massachusetts who are not eligible for direct EECBGs.

These grants could be used any of the following activities:

  • Development of an Energy Efficiency and Conservation Strategy
  • Energy Efficiency and Conservation Programs for Buildings and Facilities
  • Energy Efficiency Retrofits
  • Development and Implementation of Transportation Programs: including development of infrastructure such as bike lanes and pathways and pedestrian walkways; synchronization of traffic signals; implementation of intelligent transportation system (ITS) strategies; idle-reduction technologies.
  • Training of building inspectors to promote building energy efficiency
  • Distributed generation technologies: including district heating and cooling; combined heat and power (CHP) systems; energy storage systems; absorption chillers; desiccant humidifiers; ground source heat pumps; microturbines
  • Energy Efficient Traffic Signals and Street Lighting
  • Renewable Energy Electricity Generating Technologies on Government Buildings: including PV, wind, fuel cells, biomass

Competitive Grants

Habitat Restoration in Coastal Areas
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is announcing the availability of $5 million in funding under ARRA for habitat restoration through the Coastal Program. They anticipate making 20 grants of $25,000.

ARRA funds will prioritize habitat restoration projects that address high priority wetland, upland, or riparian habitats in selected geographic areas. Projects must provide direct benefits to Federal Trust species (i.e., migratory birds, threatened and endangered species, inter-jurisdictional fish, certain marine mammals, and species of international concern. While coastal ecosystems comprise less than 10 percent of the Nation’s land area, they support far greater proportions of our living resources. Specifically, coastal areas (such as those in Massachusetts) support a much higher percentage of the Nation’s threatened and endangered species, fishery resources, migratory songbirds, and migrating and wintering waterfowl. It is a goal of the program to secure at least 50 percent of project costs from non-Service sources, but this goal applies to the national program as a whole, and does not have to be achieved on a project-by-project basis. Those interested in requesting assistance for a potential habitat restoration project must contact their local Coastal Program coordinator for information about funding and technical assistance availability. A listing of all Coastal Program coordinators is available here.

Deadline for applications is Sept 30, 2009.

Education

State Funding

To date, Massachusetts has received $236 million in education stimulus funds-representing a combination of funding for Title I, IDEA, Vocational Rehabilitation Grants and Independent Living Grants. On April 1st, Massachusetts received $82 million in Title I funding and more than $149 million in IDEA funding. This represents 50% of the Title I and IDEA funding Massachusetts is eligible for in total.

On June 1st, Massachusetts’s application for ARRA funds for state education was recently approved by the US Department of Education. The state was approved for $666 million, which they should begin receiving immediately. The state will be able to apply for another $328 million this fall as well. Click here for more details. Over the next two years, Massachusetts will receive an estimated $1.88 billion to support early education, K-12 education and higher education.

Competitive Grants

Teacher Quality Partnership (TQP) Grants Program
ARRA makes $ 143 million is available for a Teacher Quality Partnerships Grants. The Department of Education expects to approve 25- 35 grants with an average award of $1.5 million.  Through these grants, DOE hopes to: Improve student achievement; improve the quality of new and prospective teachers by improving the preparation of prospective teachers and enhancing professional development activities for new teachers; hold teacher preparation programs at institutions of higher education (IHEs) accountable for preparing highly qualified teachers; and recruit highly qualified individuals, including minorities and individuals from other occupations, into the teaching force.

The program seeks to achieve all of these goals by creating partnerships among IHEs, high-need school districts (local educational agencies (LEAs)) their high-need schools, and/or high-need early childhood education (ECE) program and nonprofits. These partnerships would create model teacher preparation programs at the pre-baccalaureate level through the implementation of specific reforms of the IHE’s existing teacher preparation programs, and/or model teaching residency programs for individuals with strong academic and/or professional backgrounds but without teaching experience.  TQP Grants may also support school leadership programs to train superintendents, principals, ECE program directors, and other school leaders in high-need or rural LEAs.

Deadline for Notice of Intent to Apply is June 26, 2009.

Applications for grants under the Teacher Quality Partnership must be submitted electronically using e-Application, accessible through the Department’s e-Grants Web site here. However, in an effort to have a better understanding of the number of entities that intend to apply for funding under this competition, DOE is encouraging each potential applicant to notify the Department by sending a short e-mail message indicating the applicant’s intent to submit an application for funding. The e-mail need not include information regarding the content of the proposed application, only the applicant’s intent to submit it. The Secretary requests that this e-mail notification be sent to Peggi Zelinko at TQPartnership@ed.gov. Applicants that fail to provide this e-mail notification may still apply for funding.

(1) The eligible partnership must include each of the following:

    (i) A high-need LEA.
    (ii) A high-need school or consortium of high-need schools served by the high need LEA, or, as applicable, a high-need ECE program.
    (iii) A partner institution.
    (iv) A school, department, or program of education within such partner institution, which may include an existing teacher professional development program with proven outcomes within a four-year IHE that provides intensive and sustained collaboration between faculty and LEAs
    (v) A school or department of arts and sciences within such partner institution; and

(2) May include any of the following:

    (i) The Governor of the State.
    (ii) The State educational agency.
    (iii) The State board of education.
    (iv) The State agency for higher education.
    (v) A business.
    (vi) A public or private nonprofit educational organization.
    (vii) An educational service agency.
    (viii) A teacher organization.
    (ix) A high-performing LEA, or a consortium of high-performing LEAs, that can serve as a resource to the partnership.
    (x) A charter school (xi) A school or department within the partner institution that focuses on psychology and human development.
    (xii) A school or department within the partner institution with comparable expertise in the disciplines of teaching, learning, and child and adolescent development.
    (xiii) An entity operating a program that provides alternative routes to State certification of teachers.

Click here for full announcement.

Higher Education

Competitive Grants

The Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE)

On June 3rd, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan announced a $7 million special competitive grant to establish innovative and sustainable community college programs that prepare displaced workers for second careers. This first-of-its-kind grant program will be used to develop national models that can be replicated across the country, especially in communities where autoworkers have lost their jobs.  The Secretary called upon institutions of higher learning, private and public nonprofit organizations, and other agencies to propose model programs for training adults to pursue family-sustaining second careers.

Funding could be used to provide services, such as tutoring, academic and career counseling, and help with the registration process. They also may be used to remove financial constraints for adults returning to school, including child care, transportation, and textbooks, however, DOE specifies that programs created with this funding must be sustainable beyond the three-year grant period.

Applications are due on Aug. 4.  DOE anticipates awarding approximately 28 grants by mid-September with projects beginning on or about Oct. 1. The estimated range of the grant awards is $300,000-$750,000 over a three-year period.
Please click here to see the press release and view more information.

NIST Recovery Act Measurement Science and Engineering Research Grants

Program: Providing the Technology Infrastructure to Address National Priorities.
ARRA makes $35 million available to the Commerce Department’s National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for grants and cooperative agreements for measurement science and engineering research in the following six focus areas deemed critical national importance: energy, environment and climate change, information technology/cybersecurity, biosciences/healthcare, manufacturing, and physical infrastructure. The program is “intended to advance the state of knowledge and practice in these areas of critical national importance, in support of NIST’s mission to promote U.S. innovation and industrial competitiveness by advancing measurement science, standards, and technology in ways that enhance economic security and improve our quality of life.”

NIST anticipates funding 20-60 proposals at the level of $500,000 to $1,500,000 per award for a project period of up to 3 years. All applications are due Monday, July 13, 2009.

NIST Research Construction Grants

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has announced the availability of approximately $120 million in competitive grants for the construction of new or expanded scientific research buildings at higher education institutions and nonprofit organizations. NIST expects to fund 8-12 projects. Possible construction projects could include laboratories, test facilities, measurement facilities, research computing facilities, and observatories.

Interested organizations must provide NIST with a Letter of Intent outlining the proposed project by 3 p.m. EDT, Thursday, June 25, 2009. Organizations that submit timely Letters of Intent may then submit full proposals, which must be received by 3 p.m. EDT, Monday, Aug. 10, 2009. Review, selection and grant award processing is expected to be completed by the end of February 2010.

Measurement Science and Engineering Fellowship Program.
The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is establishing a $20 million financial assistance program for awardees to develop and implement with NIST a measurement science and engineering fellowship program as part of NIST’s activities implementing ARRA. The fellowship program is intended to “promote training and practical experience in science and engineering, and to advance NIST’s mission to promote U.S. innovation and industrial competitiveness by advancing measurement science, standards, and technology in ways that enhance economic security and improve our quality of life.” NIST anticipates awarding 1-5 awards for a period of performance of up to 3years.  Senior Research Fellowships will be offered to qualified scientists and engineers working at U.S. private firms, U.S. non-profit organizations, U.S. universities and colleges, hospitals and other organizations in fields of science and engineering that contribute to NIST’s measurement science programs. All applications, paper and electronic, must be received by Monday, July 27, 2009.

Regional Sequestration Technology Training
National Energy Technology Laboratory has announced $6.97 million available under ARRA to fund Regional Sequestration Technology Training. Grant applications are sought from companies, trade groups, and other organizations that can develop regional sequestration technology training to facilitate transfer of knowledge and technologies required for site development, operations, and monitoring of commercial carbon capture and storage (CCS) projects. This training will focus on the applied engineering and science of CCS for site developers, geologists, engineers, and technicians.

It is believed that carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies offer great potential for reducing CO2 emissions and mitigating global climate change. It is expected that deploying these technologies will require a significantly expanded workforce trained in the various specialties that are currently under-represented in the United States. Education and training activities undertaken will develop a future generation of geologists and other scientists, and engineers that will provide the human capital and skills required for implementing and deploying CCS technologies. This regional CO2 sequestration technology training will advance the United States in its position as the leader in technology for addressing climate change and for developing near-zero emission technologies to significantly reduce CO2 emissions from power plants. It is expected that award floors will be $500,000 and award ceilings will be $995,000. Deadline is July 22nd.

Wind Energy Consortia between Institutions of Higher Learning and Industry
ARRA makes $24,000,000 available for two award to fund consortia between institutions of higher learning and industry that will perform focused research on critical wind energy challenges. The consortia must include at least one four-year institution of higher learning that has at least one engineering program that is accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). The funding will be focused on two complementary areas, but not separate topics: Topic Area 1: Partnerships for Wind Research and Turbine Reliability: Universities in regions of the country in a Power Class 3 at 50 meters or greater wind region with consistent wind resources throughout the year are encouraged to team with industry partners to establish facilities/equipment and a research agenda necessary to study major challenges facing today’s wind industry. Proposals must address one or more challenges described in the report “20 Percent Wind Energy by 2030” and shall include descriptions of how the wind hardware and software will be acquired. DOE highly encourages research in turbine reliability as a topic in any consortia proposal. Topic Area 2: Wind Energy Research Development: University R D to advance material design, performance measurements, analytical models, and leveraging partnerships with industry to improve power systems operations, maintenance or repair operations, wind turbine and/or component manufacturing, and interdisciplinary system integration. Fellowships, internships, etc. may be used to support the research agenda. Universities are encouraged to partner with the wind industry in defining their R D agenda, developing their curriculum, and intern partnerships. Deadline is Jul 29, 2009    Click here to view the Opportunity.

Housing and Community Development

Guidance on State Allocation of CDBG-R
As was mentioned in earlier volumes of the newsletter, as part of ARRA, HUD has extended funding for Community Development Block Grants, the so-called CDBG-R grants. The majority of the grantees identified by HUD, are individual municipalities meeting certain population and need requirements and are designated at entitlement communities. In Massachusetts there are 36 such entitlement communities. However, HUD also provides$ 9.1 million infunding to the Commonwealth (DHCD) to disperse, as they see fit, to communities that do not receive direct funding. In an effort to ensure a fair and equitable distribution, DHCD has an established competitive grant process that uses to award these funds.  Typically, DHCD accepts applications electronically through its website, but since the ARRA provides for additional funds that were not incorporated in the normal application process, information has not yet been made available on the application dates for these CDBG-R funds.

However, because we expect DHCD to award the new ARRA funding in a similar way,we thought it prudent to review the funding criteria they will likely use.

CDBG funds under DHCD control are divided into four programs: The Community Development Fund (CDF) I, CDF II, Mini-Entitlement Grants, the Economic Development Fund. Once applications are received by eligible (non-entitlement) communities, each is assigned a Community Wide Needs score from 0 to 35. Based upon this score and a statistical formula, municipalities will be given funds for CDF I, which is for high needs, or CDF II, which are for moderate needs communities. The Mini-Entitlement Grants are designed for communities that fit a more specific criterion: those that attain a certain Community Wide Needs Score (28), have a poverty rate above that of the statewide area, and have a population over 12,000.

The Economic Development Fund offers financing solutions for a myriad of economic and community development projects designed to meet the needs of businesses which retain or create low to moderate income jobs, support revitalization efforts and enhance the quality of life in the community. Projects which receive funding include assistance to non-profits and for-profits, loans, or grants.

In the past, the vast majority of CDBG money from the state is given to CDF I recipients, with the remaining three funds receiving only modest awards.

Children and Families

Competitive Grants

Community Services Block Grant Training and Technical Assistance Program- National Training for Financial Management and Administrative Governance

The Office of Community Services (OCS) within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) has announced that will be accepting application to fund one new grant for $250,000 to create an enhanced nationwide training and technical assistance strategy for community-level financial management and administrative governance among eligible entities in the Community Services Block Grant (CSBG) program.

This one year grant will support a national technical assistance strategy to help CSBG eligible entities address needs in three major focus areas: 1) Organizational Stabilization and Support for CSBG entities experiencing significant fiscal or organizational challenges; 2) Capacity Developmentto ensure ongoing high quality program management among eligible entities adapting to changing community needs; and 3) Promotion of Exemplary Practices by identifying and disseminating service approaches and models that have been successful in addressing specific community needs related to the reduction of poverty, the revitalization of low-income communities, and the empowerment of low-income families and individuals in rural and urban areas to become fully self-sufficient.

CSBG provides States, Community Action Agencies or other organizations designated by the States, funds to alleviate the causes and conditions of poverty in communities.  The funds provide a range of services and activities to assist the needs of low-income individuals including the homeless, migrants and the elderly. Grant amounts are determined by a formula based on each State’s population. Grantees receiving funds under the CSBG program are required to provide services and activities addressing employment, education, better use of available income, housing, nutrition, emergency services and/or health. Already, some Community Action Agencies in Massachusetts have partnered with other community based nonprofits to deliver ARRA funded CSBG services.

Eligible applicants for this grant are CSBG eligible entities, consisting of statewide or local organizations or associations, and non-profit organizations with demonstrated expertise in providing training to individuals and organizations on methods of effectively addressing the needs of low-income families and communities, and knowledge of and experience with the Community Services Network.  Due Date 06/26/2009. For more information see here.

Helpful websites:

Full list of federal grants available through the Recovery Act

Medicaid and Healthcare

Nutrition

Housing, Infrastructure, Economic Development

Unemployment Services:

Environment and Energy:

Save the dates:

  • November 13 – MNN / Associated Grant Makers Annual Conference – “Grantmakers and Grantees for the Common Good” | Sheraton Framingham

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